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jsan2011

How long to leave your brew in the Mr. Beer

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I know everybody has their own opinion about how to leave their brew in the fermentor. What is the recommended time needed for your brew. Should I leave it for 7 or 14 days?

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Most, including me, recommend 3 weeks in the LBK, then 4 weeks in the bottle before the first taste test.

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I'm by no means an expert, will be bottling my third batch (winter Dark Ale) next Saturday. But from the advice I've read here and what I've done is leave it for three weeks although I cheek the SG at around two weeks. So far this has been good advice. These guys here have lots of experience.

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Unless you've got a Hydrometer, 21 days in the fermenter, then bottle, wait 4 weeks at room temp, then fridge and drink.

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"TNT" post=299141 said:

Most, including me, recommend 3 weeks in the LBK, then 4 weeks in the bottle before the first taste test.

Sage words, worth heeding. Not that I always follow them...

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I go 3 weeks in the LBK, even though I have/use a hydrometer.

I sample one after a month, then wait at least another to start drinking the others.

Just the way I "Do IT" .....


:chug:

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I also go three weeks in the fermenter, then four weeks at room temperature once bottled. Not only do I feel it benefits the beer, but it fits my brewing schedule. I have three batches going at all times, each brewed a week apart.

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Because of the way my work schedule is, I go 19 days in the fermenter, though I could push it to 24/25 if needed.

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I also ferment for 3 weeks, even with the hydrometer. It gives the brew more time to mellow out. Then at least 4 weeks carbing and conditioning (most brews usually get longer than that since my pipeline is full).

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Most, including me, recommend 3 weeks in the LBK, then 4 weeks in the bottle before the first taste test.

BAM! Right there, pals. 3 weeks in LBK and 4 weeks in bottles. I never deviate from this unless it's a wheat beer or an IPA.

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what makes the IPAs and wheat beers merit different brewing times? and how long in particular for a wheat beer? I intend to try a wheat beer in the future.

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The general feeling in this forum is that wheats normally don't need a full 4 weeks of carbo-conditioning. Several of the long time Ninkasi advised me that a wheat can be cracked in 2 -3 weeks....as soon as they are fully carbed up.

IPA's are often consumed "young" so the hops flavor and aromas don't fade away too much. We work so hard to infuse the brew with that aroma and flavor but they can fade over time and you don;t want to miss out on the full sensory experience.

I've had my WWW and ADIPA both at 3 weeks and they were excellent.

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I do all my Beers 3 weeks "EXCEPT" Lagers.

My Lagers work out to 4 weeks in the LBK (16-18 days @ 50*F, D-rest for 3 days 62*F, then 7 days @ 50*F then Bottle).

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I have a hydrometer and I like to go at least a few days in the fermenter after it is done reaching the final gravity. I only really have free time on the weekends so it usually goes 3 weeks unless it was a really fast brew and got to the final gravity in a couple of days.

After that it's a minimum of 2 weeks in the bottle at room temp and 48 hours in the fridge. That is for IPAs. The less hoppy and more complicated the malt bill the longer it stays at room temp.

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Right! True lagers that ferment colder and need a D-Rest might take more time. Those yeast tend to work a little slower I believe.

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So according to this thread, instead of 2-2-2 it is actually 3-4-0.5? For wheats and hoppy beers, it's 3-2-0.5? Finally, lagers are 2.5-0.5-1-4-0.5 (I know nothing about lagers but from Trollby's post it sounds like there is 5 stages)

Sorry, just trying to understand since the older FAQs said 2-2-2.

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"FedoraDave" post=299167 said:

I also go three weeks in the fermenter, then four weeks at room temperature once bottled. Not only do I feel it benefits the beer, but it fits my brewing schedule. I have three batches going at all times, each brewed a week apart.

Yup... I do the same thing all the time 3 weeks and then 4 in bottle

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The 2-2-2 was: 2 in fermentor - 2 for carb - 2 for condition.

And this works fine for the "Standard" refill or any beer with an ABV of 4 or less


I just find that I like 3 weeks in fermentor forclean up (Kind of a pre-condition phase)

Also I think most beers will be better with 6 weeks plus in bottle (Exception being Wheats and hoppy beers like IPA since they are good young)

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OK, I think this is where I was confused. I thought 2-2-2 meant 2 weeks in the LBK, 2 weeks in the bottle at room temp, and 2 weeks in the fridge. If the last 2-2 is 2 weeks carb and 2 weeks conditioning, how do you know where one ends and the other begins. Is there anything required on my part? If not, why not just call it 2-4 instead of 2-2-2 to make it less confusing?

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I personally do call it 2-4 in that regard. You can call it 2-4-2 if you want to do 2 weeks in the fridge then.

Although your beer is carbed in 2 weeks, it's rare that the yeast has cleaned up the undesirable flavors it makes while fermenting (edit: to be clear - in the bottle to carb) before 3 or 4 weeks in the bottle, and if you stick it in the fridge then it never will. So I'm an advocate for just saying 2-4 ... if you keg and force carb then things are different.

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I call it "3-4" like the famous defense and you are right, there is no "#" for the amount of time in the fridge. I chill on Tuesday if I'm drinking Friday/Saturday but I don;t count that time anywhere......it just is what it is.

I also agree that going 3 weeks in the LBK helps clear your beer by letting the yeast clean up after themselves. I also cold crash the LBK for a couple of days before bottling to help drop more "stuff" out of suspension and compact the trub layer. All tips I've learned right here in this ole forum.

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if you keg and force carb then things are different.

Whole 'nother ball game there Mashani!

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"jsan2011" post=300136 said:

Ok I'm brewing a wheat beer how long should I keep it in the fermenter and how long in the bottles?


3 weeks fermenter, and 4 weeks bottles.

Edit: What recipe are you brewing?

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3 weeks in LBK and then at least 3 in bottles.......I've drank both WWW and WMW at three weeks and enjoyed them. Wheats don't need the extra time to clear as they aren't going to be crystal clear due to the wheat base. Going 4 weeks in bottles won't hurt it either.

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As packerduf stated 3-4 is fine for Wheat beer, I find the lower ABV Wheat is ready in 3 weeks, but my Weisenbock (German Wheat) since high ABV needs 10weeks or so

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Damn good point about "big beers" - they do take a lot longer to condition out.

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"Trollby" post=300163 said:

As packerduf stated 3-4 is fine for Wheat beer, I find the lower ABV Wheat is ready in 3 weeks, but my Weisenbock (German Wheat) since high ABV needs 10weeks or so


"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=300179 said:

Damn good point about "big beers" - they do take a lot longer to condition out.


Good input, gents! This is precisely why, as an afterthought, I asked what recipe he was using. We could be much more specific with our advice, if he was a little more specific with his question.

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i personally leave the beer in the lbk for 3 weeks, even though i do have a hydrometer. the reason is simple, i dont perv the lbk and at the end of 3 weeks it is completely done. i still take an FG reading so i can get abv but that is it, i have a enough of a pipeline that i dont need to drink any of my home brew before 4 weeks.

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Ok I'm concerned... is it normal for my to stop selling like "yeast farts" when it was smelling like that a couple of days ago.


Is there something that could of caused that??

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After the active (roiling, foaming) fermentation is over, I never notice as much aroma coming out of the LBK.

RDWHAHB!!

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Everyone else pretty much summed it up. Without a hydrometer, I'd let it go a full 3 weeks. In general for most brews, 2 weeks is enough but it doesn't hurt to let it sit the extra 7 days. A hydrometer is a great investment and easy to use! ;)
[img size=300]http://www.fermentarium.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/coopers-european-lager-kit-hydrometer.jpg

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Patience is a virtue or “the numbers”.....2-2-2, 3-2-2 , 3-4, or my preferred 3-4-1

Different sources use different numbers, but in general what they all mean is that your beer won’t be ready to drink as fast as you might have been lead to believe by the Mr. Beer packaging. The first number in "the numbers" ,whether it is a 2 or 3, is to give enough time to make sure the beer is completely fermented. If you have a hydrometer you will be able to know for sure when the beer is done fermenting. Having said that, I have a hydrometer and still commonly let fermentation go 2-3 weeks regardless as long as I am not in a a hurry.

Mr Beer Fan’s: 2-2-2
My first introduction to “the numbers” was the 2-2-2 from the Mr. Beer Fans website. In this version 2-2-2 means 2 weeks fermenting at 65-75 degrees, 2 weeks carbonating in the bottles at 65-75 degrees, and 2 weeks cold conditioning at fridge temps.

The BORG’s: 2-2-2 or 3-2-2
The BORG’s numbers generally mean 2 or 3 weeks fermenting at 65-75 degrees, 2 weeks carbonating in the bottles at 65-75 degrees, and 2 weeks conditioning in the bottles at 65-75 degrees. Refrigeration isn’t usually mentioned with this version of 2-2-2. I have heard this referred to as 2-4 when bottle carbonation and conditioning are combined or 3 -4 if the fermentations phase is extended a week.

KokomoSam’s Amalgamation numbers: 3-4-1
I personally follow the 3-4-1 version. In this version 3-4-1 means 3 weeks fermenting at 65-75 degrees for Mr. Beer Fromunda yeast, 4 weeks carbonating and conditioning in the bottles at 65-75 degrees, and 1 week cold conditioning at fridge temps. The first three in 3-4-1 is increased from 2 to make sure that fermentation is complete without a hydrometer measurement. For the four in 3-4-1, let just say patience is usually rewarded. In my experience my beer tastes better the longer I have aged it.. I sometimes extended this to 6 weeks at room temperature for high ABV beers or beers with lots of fruit, spices or adjuncts. The final 1 is for a week of cold conditioning to let the beer settle and condition/lager a bit.

Again all of this is just guidelines and what it really means is it will take longer than two weeks to have drinkable beer. Check out this thread with some user's experiences...
See.... http://community.mrbeer.com/forum/8-new-brewers-and-faqs/248344-the-borg-is-right-2-weeks-in-bottle-ain-t-enough
See... http://community.mrbeer.com/forum/8-new-brewers-and-faqs/275472-wcpa-pleasantly-floored

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I like 3-4-1 as well, just always called it 3-4 and didn;t count the cold in da fridge time.

Cool.

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Ferment 21 days at 66 degrees

Carb and condition 40 days minimum at 58-60 degrees in a beer cellar.

Some of what I'm drinking now is pushing a 70-80 days in the cellar and it's tasting pretty good.

Once a good pipeline gets established, you can jump from brew to brew without hammering the supply of any one brew.

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