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charlieb

Briess LME and Boiling Hops Question

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Can we add a Briess LME without boiling in with the typical Mr. Beer HME?

Like you do with a deluxe recipe where you a Mr. Beer LME into the DME but with no boil.

Second question:

Since you can not boil the DME, can you boil hops with just water and then add in your HME like you typically would do following a Mr. Beer recipe?

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From what I've read boiling hops in water will produce a grassy taste. You can make a hop tea but that won't give you bitterness. Why not just add the LME to a gallon or so of hot water, bring it to a boil and add the hops for 15 minutes?

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That was my plan anyways.

But I was curious to how much flavor you get because typically you boil the hops when not using an HME as opposed to just steeping.

I just have so many questions :)

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actually, dme can be boiled. just watch that stuff will be boiling over. it is called the hot break. and if it does it is a pain in the ass to clean up. so do your boil in dme and when you are done, continue with the mr beer stuff and instructions. :cheers:

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Just to clarify, you can boil DME and/or LME. It's best not to boil the HME. So do the hop-boil with the DME/LME, and add the HME at flame-out.

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When I use Briess LME with a Mr Beer HME the process goes like this-
1- boil 3 quarts water then add 1-2 cups Briess LME
2- bring back to boil and add hops
3- after all hops have been boiled (Bittering, flavoring, finishing) remove from heat
4- stir in remaining Breiss LME and Mr Beer HME
5- cool wort to 65-68 degrees then follow Mr Beer instructions from that point

I follow this procedure each time I brew and all of my brews have come out pretty good so far.

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"Boe1971" post=301342 said:

When I use Briess LME with a Mr Beer HME the process goes like this-
1- boil 3 quarts water then add 1-2 cups Briess LME
2- bring back to boil and add hops
3- after all hops have been boiled (Bittering, flavoring, finishing) remove from heat
4- stir in remaining Breiss LME and Mr Beer HME
5- cool wort to 65-68 degrees then follow Mr Beer instructions from that point

I follow this procedure each time I brew and all of my brews have come out pretty good so far.

Why boil part of the DME and then the rest at flameout? Is there a benefit to flavor or is it just to avoid boil overs?

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"King of Memphis" post=301664 said:

"Boe1971" post=301342 said:

When I use Briess LME with a Mr Beer HME the process goes like this-
1- boil 3 quarts water then add 1-2 cups Briess LME
2- bring back to boil and add hops
3- after all hops have been boiled (Bittering, flavoring, finishing) remove from heat
4- stir in remaining Breiss LME and Mr Beer HME
5- cool wort to 65-68 degrees then follow Mr Beer instructions from that point

I follow this procedure each time I brew and all of my brews have come out pretty good so far.

Why boil part of the DME and then the rest at flameout? Is there a benefit to flavor or is it just to avoid boil overs?

What is the Late Extract Addition brewing method?

The Late Extract Addition process is very simple – the bulk of the fermentable sugars, generally malt extract, are added near the end of the boil, rather than at the beginning. Add 15-25% of your malt and/or fermentable sugars at the beginning of the boil. This will create a wort that has malt sugars and enzymes necessary for the boiling process, but creates an thinner wort for the majority of the boiling time. Add the remaining 75-85% of the malt extract during the last 15 minutes of the boil – enough time for the malt to be fully dissolved and sterilized by the boil.

There are several reasons to use the late extract brewing method. Several benefits come from reducing over-caramelization. One of these benefits is that the beer will turn out lighter, which can be difficult to do otherwise with extract beers. It can also reduce scorched malt flavors that can result from brewing high-gravity beers, or boiling the wort in a small brewpot, where the wort is more concentrated and susceptible to scorching.

Another result out of the late extract method is increased hop utilization. Using the late extract method, you will get a more bitter beer than you would if you were added 100% of the malt at the beginning of the boil. This may be a good or bad thing. The upside is that you get better efficiency in terms of bitterness extraction from your hops. The possible drawback is that you may create a beer that is more bitter than you’d like. Many brewers choose to use about 20% less bittering hops to compensate for the increased hop utilization. This saves you hops!

Give it a try on your next light beer and see if you like the results!

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Guest System Admin

That's good info right there. Main points are (1) to get hop utilization for boil and (2) to prevent darkening/scorching.

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I am making craft series NW Ale today. I would like to add a pale LME and hops. Can I put the hops in the keg after 10 days of conditioning and then filter out before bottling (giving them 4 days in the keg) or is it best to steep them with the HME and let them condition in the keg with the brew?

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MrB recipes call for hops to be tossed in at flameout with the HME and stay in the keg for the full time until it's bottled.

Most of us let the primary fermentation complete first (about 7 days) and then toss the hops in (commando or in a hop sack) for the remainder of the time (for me, that's 14 more days).

The general thought process is that the primary fermentation produces a lot of CO2 that can "scrub" away the hop oils and therefore the flavor and aroma they impart.

If you don't have any hop sacks, you can go commando and the pellets will break up and fall to the bottom of the LBK in the trub layyer. As long as you have the front propped up on CD cases or something else that tilts the LBK, the hops should settle far enough back to not interfere with bottling.

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Thank you that is what I will do. I have a hop sack so that will make things easier. I researched the borg and was getting nervous about the grassy taste that I found referenced.

Thanks again Wings Fan!! :banana:

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I'm not worried about any grassiness but if you are, you can always add your LME to a gallon of water and bring to a boil, then add 1/2 of your hops and boil for 10 minutes before flameout.

Then after the first 7 days, you can dry hop with the remainder of your hops. I typically use an ounce of hops for each 2.25 gallon batch but then subdivide it into long, medium and short boils. For an IPA or other hop forward beer, I usually use 1.5 ounces of hops total with .50 to .75 ounce held back for dry hopping.

You could use an ounce for dry hopping but I'm frugal with my hops!

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