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kc2hsu

Fermentation Temp - Whoops!

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I started a batch of the Patriot Lager which I am really excited about. My first batch of Mr.Beer (American Light) is almost done conditioning so I thought it would be good to get another brew started.

I typically ferment betwen 68-71 degrees. I just added the stick-on thermometer to the keg as well which is really handy.

Basically after a couple days of fermentation my fiancé and I woke up to find that it was 78 degrees in the bedroom (where I brew my beer). Of course waking up I didn't think about the fact I was sweating to death but I thought to myself, "holy crap! My brew!"

We got the temp back down but the yeast was definitely busy. I would say that it was at that temperature for 10hrs worst case.

I am going to follow-through with brewing the beer and follow the 2-2-2 process I have read about but should I be concerned at all?

By the way, I am new to the community as well as brewing. Very exciting hobby. Working in IT all day, excited about a hobby that doesn't involve electronics!

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I would think it would be fine. I think that over 100 kills the yeast but I could be wrong. I think most here would recommend 3 weeks in the fermenter and 3-4 in the bottle before hitting the fridge.

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Thanks radonc73.

I have been a bit confused as to the conditioning phase. Mr. Beer instructions say to put them in the fridge but I have read posts online that room temperature is best.

What do you think?

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welcom to the borg kc.
I usually ferment for 3wks (I also use a hydrometer), then condition in bottle for 3wks at room temp or so (depending on the style you are tryin to achieve) and then put in fridge for 2-3wks or so.

Now if your talking about getting good head retention... then ya a beer at room temp will give you a better head.

Hope that helped a little.

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"radonc73" post=306886 said:

I would think it would be fine. I think that over 100 kills the yeast but I could be wrong. I think most here would recommend 3 weeks in the fermenter and 3-4 in the bottle before hitting the fridge.

I had a batch of powerful patriot ale kick off and stay at 78 for two days it turned out to taste like hard hard cider.Not drinkable. Just my two cents. I know now to keep close eye on fermentation temps and carb/cond temps.

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Hello kc2hsu and welcome to the forum. Consistently with the temps. is important when brewing beer. I try to ferment on the low side of the yeast recommendations. Temp swings are not real good, but I'm sure you will have beer, just try to keep it more consistent next time throughout fermentation.
:chug: good luck and happy brewing :chug:

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I was thinking maybe 10 hours it would be OK, but I have never had this happen. I was thinking about the yeast dying off and not thinking flavor see I learn something everyday here.

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First off welcome aboard!

You should be fine. If you ferment at higher temps for days on end you might end up with some off flavors, but 10 hours shouldn't be a problem.

A lot of guys on here (including myself) ferment in the LBK (little brown keg) for 3 weeks then bottle and condition/carb at the same temps you fermented at at least 4 weeks. Then you can throw a bottle into the fridge for a few days and taste.

If you condition/carb in the fridge you won't get any carbonation. Fridge temps put the yeast to sleep as then need warmer temps to do their thing. ;)

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Cleveland,

For my last batch (American Light) I fermented 2 weeks at approx. 70 degrees, carbonated at room temperature (same temp as fermentation process) for two weeks and I fridge conditioned for two weeks.

I have tasted the beer here and there to see how it changes. It definitely needs more carbonation. Wasn't sure if I just rushed from Carbonation to Conditioning too quick. I guess in reality it's still a young beer.

I appreciate the input everyone. I will have to give the various steps more time to do their thing on the batch I am working on now.

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Guest System Admin

I don't think that MrB instructions say to put them in the firdge. You may be interpreting the term "lager" which MrB uses to mean "condition" as cold conditioning when it's not.

Room Temp conditioniing for at least 3 (Wheats & IPAs) to 4 (all other except high ABV beers) weeks.

High ABV beers require more time to condition.

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You may not have any problems from your temperature spike, but if you notice fruity or flowery flavors (esters)that are hard to pin down, or spicy, peppery, or even rubbery flavors (phenols), and/or your beer has a hot alcohol character, you will have a good idea of the reason. Yeast stress produces estery and phenolic flavors, and can be caused by temperature changes and fermenting too warm. Fusel alcohols (aka fusel oils), which cause the hot alcohol flavor, are a result of fermenting to hot, and can be a source of headaches as well. That said, there's no guarantee that you'll taste anything unusual at all. What's done is done; no sense worrying about it.

When bottle conditioning, my personal opinion is that the beer doesn't even properly carbonate until a month has passed. Giving it time allows the CO2 to dissolve thoroughly and will create a thick, lasting head of small bubbles, while a beer that is opened to soon will produce large bubbles and a head that disappears fairly quickly. The mouthfeel reflects that as well. A stronger beer often needs to condition longer. Which is not to say that I never open my beers early, I'm drinking a green beer that has only conditioned two weeks right now; but that's just because I'm impatient to see how a beer I haven't made before (Albert's Atomic Altbier with the new extracts) is progressing. Some acetylaldehide (a fermentation byproduct produced by the second ferment in the bottle gives a cidery taste that conditions out) for the yeast to still consume, but pretty decent otherwise! Think I'm gonna like this one.

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Welcome to the forum!
[attachment=10014]welcome2_2012-12-20.gif[/attachment]

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When bottle conditioning, my personal opinion is that the beer doesn't even properly carbonate until a month has passed. Giving it time allows the CO2 to dissolve thoroughly and will create a thick, lasting head of small bubbles, while a beer that is opened to soon will produce large bubbles and a head that disappears fairly quickly.

I do believe that this is the BEST way I've ever seen it (carb/conditioning time required)explained on this here forum.

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Welcome OP!

It's funny, I recently finished up on a batch of Classic American Light; I did 3 in the fermenter, and carbonated room temp for a week, then 4 weeks in the fridge. I opened a bottle up on week 2 of the fridge and there were some bubbles but an unsatisfying head nonetheless: you could still see the golden liquid looking down from above the glass.

I cracked a bottle open last night though and it had a really nice head, maybe about an inch and a half. Maybe I got lucky with only 1 week at room temp but it seemed to turn out nicely.

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=307085 said:

When bottle conditioning, my personal opinion is that the beer doesn't even properly carbonate until a month has passed. Giving it time allows the CO2 to dissolve thoroughly and will create a thick, lasting head of small bubbles, while a beer that is opened to soon will produce large bubbles and a head that disappears fairly quickly.

I do believe that this is the BEST way I've ever seen it (carb/conditioning time required)explained on this here forum.


+1

Although now that I mostly keg, I can control the amount of head fairly well with my picnic taps. I've always done natural carbonation with priming sugar with great results on head texture but I've got a keg on the set and forget method favored by Screwy that should be ready in 4-5 more days. I'm anxious to see how that turns out.

http://community.mrbeer.com/forum/18-advanced-brewing-techniques/294317-kegging-101-getting-foam-free-pours-everytime

PS - your beer will be OK.

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Well I had the temperature spike happen the other night, a whopping 79 degrees!!

I did some research on the heater I have been using to find that it had people complaining about melting power plugs and the same uncontrollable temp spike issue. I didn't have it as bad as others though, some reported 90 degree temps!

Needless to say, I went out and got a new one which is actually cheaper than the one I have had, more simplistic (no digital thermostat) & has great reviews.

Not sure what to expect from this brew since it's had a bit of a rollercoaster ride but I am going to definitely give it more time to do its thing. My first batch I had mentioned is not carbonated enough. I also found that some bottles of the homebrew were not too bad but just too flat while others just taste bad.

I appreciate everyone's welcome and input!

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