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Justice

Christmas Present

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Hey everyone, my beautiful wife got my a MB premium kit for Christmas! Im super stoked and can't wait to start. I'm gonna run to the store and buy 2 gal of sping water because the tap water here in San Angelo could kill an elephant.
I have a quick question. The kit she got me came with the Aztec Mexican Cerveza and the Czeck Pilsner. For the fermentation phaze the directions say between 68-76 deg. Does that recomended tempurature change from batch to batch or type to type? I'm pretty sure I have fully understand the rest of the directions... although I will have to study up a bit on the conditioning part of the process to understand it. From what I have read so far it seems the beer is "beer" and drinkable and all but if I leave it in my fridge for another two weeks the flavors will be better? Is that even close?
Thanks for the help and I am super looking forward to my first batch! Cheers! :charlie: :lumberjack:

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That is the range of the yeast that comes with all Mr Beer kits unless they are specialized liquid yeasts. Most of us find that keeping our LBK at 68 to 72 gives best results if not in a fermentation chamber.

Remember, if the temp on the outside of the LBK is 70 then the temp inside while actively fermenting will be a few degrees higher than that.

I myself ferment at 65 by putting the LBK in the undercab wine chiller.

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"Justice" post=308371 said:

From what I have read so far it seems the beer is "beer" and drinkable and all but if I leave it in my fridge for another two weeks the flavors will be better? Is that even close?

Close, though you're best to let it condition at room temperature for about 4 weeks (2 weeks for carbonation and another 2 for conditioning) to get the best flavour. If you put it in the fridge, all yeast action will stop and not much will happen. The flavours may continue to meld a bit on the fridge, but conditioning at room temperature is best.

When it's done conditioning, leave the beer in the fridge for at least a day before drinking it. This will help to ensure that most of the sediment has dropped out and the beer pours clearer and you end up with less sediment in your glass (a bit of sediment is pretty much unavoidable with bottle conditioned beer, but by chilling the beer for a day or two you can help to reduce how much you'll get).

I'm pretty new, too, but this is what I've learned over the past few weeks from the super helpful folks on this forum.

Welcome aboard and happy brewing! :chug:

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"asnider" post=308375 said:

"Justice" post=308371 said:

From what I have read so far it seems the beer is "beer" and drinkable and all but if I leave it in my fridge for another two weeks the flavors will be better? Is that even close?

Close, though you're best to let it condition at room temperature for about 4 weeks (2 weeks for carbonation and another 2 for conditioning) to get the best flavour. If you put it in the fridge, all yeast action will stop and not much will happen. The flavours may continue to meld a bit on the fridge, but conditioning at room temperature is best.

When it's done conditioning, leave the beer in the fridge for at least a day before drinking it. This will help to ensure that most of the sediment has dropped out and the beer pours clearer and you end up with less sediment in your glass (a bit of sediment is pretty much unavoidable with bottle conditioned beer, but by chilling the beer for a day or two you can help to reduce how much you'll get).

I'm pretty new, too, but this is what I've learned over the past few weeks from the super helpful folks on this forum.

Welcome aboard and happy brewing! :chug:


+1 - I missed that part of the question!

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Nice thanks guys. So it'll ferment for two weeks in the provided keg then bottle it and set it out for about 4 weeks then refridgerate it. Looking forward to it... sounds like I will be looking forward for a while haha

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Welcome to the forum, Justice!

It looks as though your initial questions have been answered quite well. I'll only add the exhortation to click on the "Brewing 101" link on the sidebar. Read it and make sure you understand it (it's not difficult to grasp), and watch the videos.

And remember to be patient. At least two weeks fermenting, then bottle your beer, and wait another four weeks before chilling and drinking. That will give you the best odds for having a really good outcome.

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"Justice" post=308380 said:

Nice thanks guys. So it'll ferment for two weeks in the provided keg then bottle it and set it out for about 4 weeks then refridgerate it. Looking forward to it... sounds like I will be looking forward for a while haha

Patience is one of the most important ingredients to brewing good beer. But, if you're like most of us, you'll probably give in a try a bottle about a week after bottling. It's hard to resist when it's your first batch and getting an idea of what "green" beer tastes like isn't necessarily a bad thing. You'll be able to compare it to a bottle that you open farther down the road and see how much better it gets over time.

I'm just about to open the first test bottle from my first batch today. I bottled it 10 days ago, so I'm not expecting magic, but it is hard to resist and I want to see how it is coming along.

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A lot of us ferment for between 14 and 21 days.

The extra time allows the yeast to clean up after themselves and clarifies the beer somewhat.

You may also want to look into cold crashing which is putting your LBK in the fridge after the 14 or 21 days and allowing the "stuff" to fall out of suspension.

Then on bottle day, CAREFULLY pull it out and bottle it while it's still chilled. You don't want to stir it up.

Oh and put a couple of CD cases under the FRONT of the LBK while it is fermenting and cold crashing....that tips the keg up and allows the trub ("troob") sediment to settle back away from the spigot. It makes bottling with less trub in the bottles possible.

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"FedoraDave" post=308381 said:


And remember to be patient. At least two weeks fermenting, then bottle your beer, and wait another four weeks before chilling and drinking. That will give you the best odds for having a really good outcome.


Patience? I don't NEED no stinkin' patience! Oh wait... I meant I don't HAVE no stinkin' patience. My bad...

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Welcome to the borg, you came to the right place to learn how to brew great beer. If possible try to Keep your keg around 65 deg room temp. and you will be in the ballpark fermenting temp.
:chug: Good Luck and Happy Brewing :chug:

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So just a suggustion that I have seen on other forms (none beer related) the veteran members (or any really) put into one thread about stuff they have learned that aren't in the directions of the kits or whatever for beginners like myself. For instance:

"Oh and put a couple of CD cases under the FRONT of the LBK while it is fermenting and cold crashing....that tips the keg up and allows the trub ("troob") sediment to settle back away from the spigot. It makes bottling with less trub in the bottles possible. "

from Wings_fan_in_KC is a great tip that obviously isn't mentioned in the directions. A thread like this that is stickied to the top of the new brewers section or whatever it was called (lol) would be immensly helpful to new guys and maybe an acronyms list. I read up on the Brewer's glossary but alot of acronyms are still new to me. Just throwing out some suggestions for you master brewers out there

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Oh man, you got to open a gift early! I hope Santa didn't see.

Welcome to the Borg and the obsession!

:cheers:

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welcome to the borg Justice. also, to help with the waiting part, go get yourself some craft beers from the store, i personally like sam adams, but any kind with the pry off top will work. drink the free beer inside them and then rinse the bottles, when you get enough wash them in oxyclean free and if you can remove the labels and you got some bottles for bottling day. :cheers:

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My lovely wife got me the premium kit so it can with the PET bottles but I'm sure in the future ill be looking forward to glass bottles with the pry tops. Clarification for my brewbness: are beers with pry tops craft beers as a general rule of thumb?

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Guest System Admin

"Justice" post=308709 said:

My lovely wife got me the premium kit so it can with the PET bottles but I'm sure in the future ill be looking forward to glass bottles with the pry tops. Clarification for my brewbness: are beers with pry tops craft beers as a general rule of thumb?

Only pry tops, my friend, should be used. Drink up on them for bottle harvesting, the beer is free in essence. No twist tops.
:barman:

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welcome to brewing and to the community! new here too and everyone here is awesome. the 2 hardest things to learn that no one here can really teach you but yourself... patience and dont panic.

beer takes time and it's so hard to wait for things to fully mature. it's ok to break down and crack open one of your beers early to taste, but know it gets better. as for panic, lol... i'm still working on that!

best wishes to you!

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"Justice" post=308709 said:

My lovely wife got me the premium kit so it can with the PET bottles but I'm sure in the future ill be looking forward to glass bottles with the pry tops. Clarification for my brewbness: are beers with pry tops craft beers as a general rule of thumb?

A pry top does not make it a craft beer. It's more of WHO makes it. Sam addaams is good. Dogfish head. It really depends on your likings. Until you realize what a good beer can taste like, get the brown bottles.

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The PET bottles are fine. If you do glass, capping twist offs is iffy so find pry top empties and get a bench capper.

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Thanks Nong. good tip. Ill have to look specifically for Dogfish Head, I haven't tried that. I have tried a few different Sam Adams and loved em so Ill have to try more varieties of those also. In the process of brewing what is the difference in the steps or overall process that differentiates between craft and non-craft (commercial?)?

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dogfish head 60 min ipa is pretty good.

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"Justice" post=308899 said:

Thanks Nong. good tip. Ill have to look specifically for Dogfish Head, I haven't tried that. I have tried a few different Sam Adams and loved em so Ill have to try more varieties of those also. In the process of brewing what is the difference in the steps or overall process that differentiates between craft and non-craft (commercial?)?

It's not process, it's volume that separates the craft breweries from the non-craft (or the micros from the macros, to put it another way).

Up until recently, in the US, the commercial beer market was pretty much cornered by Budweiser, Miller, and Coors; the dreaded BMC you'll find referenced often here among the Borg. There were small, local breweries, such as Yeungling and Rolling Rock in Pennsylvania, and Shiner in Texas. I remember Genessee from my days living in Rochester, NY. For the most part, though, they had very limited distribution and were mostly local favorites. And they pretty much followed the template established by BMC after Prohibition; they made American Light Lagers. American beer drinkers thought that American Light Lager was the only beer there was, because there wasn't a whole lot on the market to compare it to. And, to be fair, the BMC breweries make a good American Light Lager, and they do it with remarkable consistency. That's not easy to do.

But along came the 1990s, and some young visionaries who happened to really like beer came along and decided to shake things up a little, and opened breweries that made other styles and didn't add filler grains such as corn and rice to their beer. And those beers gained a following and started a commercial beer revolution in the US. I don't have the numbers at my fingertips, but the number of independent micro-breweries in the 90s was in the hundreds. Now, the number is in the thousands. There is intense competition, both within the craft brewing community and against the macros, for market share.

Watch "Beer Wars" on Hulu. It's a real eye-opener, and it explains a lot.

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