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Knightmare

A must read for all new brewers!

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For all the new excited brewers that unwrapped a MrBeer kit this morning. Congrats and welcome to the wonderful world of brewing! Here are some necessary reads that will answer most of your questions. Feel free to ask about anything, but please read up on the links below.

http://community.mrbeer.com/brewing-101

http://community.mrbeer.com/brewer-s-glossary

http://community.mrbeer.com/frequently-asked-questions

http://community.mrbeer.com/forum/8-new-brewers-and-faqs/123726-simple-guide-line

http://community.mrbeer.com/forum/8-new-brewers-and-faqs/65050-new-brewers-please-read-malt-to-adjunct-ratios

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"stevecon" post=308701 said:

"FrozenInTime" post=308698 said:

Welcome to the forum gingerbrew!

+1 Welcome to the obsession.

+2 on the welcome, gingerbrew. Be sure to read up on all the stickies suggested. Loads of knowledge in this community. Take advantage and again welcome to the :borg:

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Welcome Ginger, listen to what these guys tell you. They are awesome!

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Welcome, Gingerbrew! Have fun with your new brew kit! :chug:

Great post, knightmare!

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:borg: welcome to the beerborg information center gingerbrew. You will be assimulated. Resistance is quite futile: we have beer.

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"Knightmare" post=308883 said:

Bump for the 1553 unregistered guest that are on the forum right now.


Looks like MB had some good Christmas sales.

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Hey! Welcome new brewers!!

Make sure you leave the beer in the LBK for 3 weeks and then carb and condition (in the bottles) at room temps for another 4 weeks....this is the generally accepted practice in this forum.

There are reasons to modify it sometimes for different beers (like you may only need 3 weeks carb/conditioning for Wheat and IPA style beers) but for the most part.......3 - 4 is the way to go.

Also, placing 2 CD jewel cases under the front of the little brown keg (LBK) during the fermentation and bottling processes to allow the trub ("troob") to settle back away from the spigot. Makes for less trub in the bottles when you're bottling your creations!

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THIS!

"Joechianti" post=309118 said:

And since I'm hoping a lot of our new brewers will be reading this thread, this is a great place for me to share what is probably the absolute number one thing I've learned here this past year, and I've learned an awful lot, so that's no small thing.

That thing is to resist the temptation to be a mad scientist and start experimenting right away. Do yourself a HUGE favor and just brew the Mr Beer recipes exactly the way they come. After experiencing them that way, then you can add, subtract, modify in any way you think will suit your taste. But as I was told, but did not listen, "how can you modify something to your taste if you don't even know what the original taste was in the first place"?

You may think that you will waste a lot of time brewing a beer that you probably won't enjoy, so if you just modify it right off, you're saving time. NO, NO, NO. That's what I did, and now I have to go back and start all over again learning the basics. Some of the brews I modified were very good, some were very bad, and most were okay. But can I duplicate all or part of any of those recipes and use that information in another recipe? NO!

If you're going to anything at all, in the very beginning, maybe just add a very little bit less water. That will make you a slighter richer beer, but should not change ANY of the flavor profiles at all.

This is how you will learn faster and become a great brewer faster. Greatness is seldom, if ever, achieved randomly.

That's my Christmas gift to all of you. Don't make the same mistake I did. Yes, you'll learn, anyway, but it will take longer and you'll regret it in the end. After a few straight up brews, and a bunch of reading and asking questions here, you'll be ready to add one trick here and one technique there, and you will be making wonderful beer before you know it.

In this game, patience is king.

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Hello everyone. Just like a lot of others I have seen here, my wife got me a Mr. Beer for Christmas. I am excited to start brewing. I browsed through the forum and have seen that there are a lot of people on here with lots of experience, and I have already headed much of your advice. I look forward to learning from some pros on here and making some good beer in the process!

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center JimH. You will be assimilated. Resistance is Quite Futile: We have beer.

As soon as you are ready, ask away.

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I Opened up my brew kit Christmas day, Many thanks to my wonderful wife!! I read the instructions and watched the DVD and went online then, started my very own run. I do have to say thanks to all that have very helpful information on what to and not to do. Only question i have is can i let it ferment too long in the keg? It says 3 weeks max but what if its done at 14 days and i let it go another week due to inexperience? Is it then ruined?

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center Derranged POJO. You will be assimilated. Resistance is Quite Futile: We have beer.

21 days in the LBK is a good thing. Two weeks if you have a Hydrometer. But I doubt your beer is ruined. ~Nong

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That depends on the individual beer D~pojo. I've had some that ranged as low as 1.030's up to 1.90's. It all depends on what fermentables are added.
With beer, a simple rule is Original Gravity divide by 4 and that should be your "shoot for" final gravity to bottle.

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Welcome aboard The Obsession All New Brewers! If you're like the rest of us here you'll soon be awash in a sea of beer and setting sail on many great brewing adventures. There's lot's of information here and plenty of hands to help you get under way. You'll soon be producing some memorable beers and having a lot of fun too in the days ahead.

Navigate on over to our Advanced Brewing Techniques area of the forum and read over the

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417" target="_blank" title="http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417">'4 Things Every Brewer Should Know About Yeast'

sticky. Yeast is a living cell, keep them healthy and they'll ferment you up some awesome tasting beers.

Set your course and sail on over to our New Brewers and FAQs area of the forum and read over the 'Malt To Adjunct Ratios' sticky.

Remember for the best tasting beer you'll want no less than 66% of the alcohol to come from malts and no more than 33% of the alcohol to come from sugars or other adjuncts.

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=309070 said:

Hey! Welcome new brewers!!

Make sure you leave the beer in the LBK for 3 weeks and then carb and condition (in the bottles) at room temps for another 4 weeks....this is the generally accepted practice in this forum.

There are reasons to modify it sometimes for different beers (like you may only need 3 weeks carb/conditioning for Wheat and IPA style beers) but for the most part.......3 - 4 is the way to go.

Also, placing 2 CD jewel cases under the front of the little brown keg (LBK) during the fermentation and bottling processes to allow the trub ("troob") to settle back away from the spigot. Makes for less trub in the bottles when you're bottling your creations!

SO, I just want to understand:

Despite the instructions saying 7-14 days, you're saying leave it in there for 21.

For the bottling portion, 2 wks room temp, 2 wks fridge conditioning?

& w. the Troob, I can only guess it's residual wort from the last test sample before actually pouring into bottles & it's just getting rid of that stuff so it doesn't mingle w. the bottle ready stuff. I just want to make sure I'm clear on that.....
I've got the American light in the LBK now & the pilsner is next after I bottle that. Does this pretty much apply across the board?

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21 days is the default if you don't use a hydrometer. Hydrometer readings allow you to "know" when the fermentation is complete.

Not using one you are flying blind so the best way to make sure your fermentation is done is to go 21 days.

Then 4 weeks in bottles at room temp (no "cold conditioning" here!!), so call it the "3-4" like the famed Dick LeBeau defensive scheme.

Trub is the sediment in the bottom of the LBK....you've probably seen the layer forming. When you bottle, it will get into the bottles....there's no way to totally prevent that. Putting the CD cases (or shims) under the front side by the spigot helps the "junk" settle back away from the bottling spigot.

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I've got another tip/trick for new brewers who may have just begun to use QBrew.
I'm not sure everyone understands this because, frankly, it's not the way it was explained to me when I asked the question in here. I knew the first part about adding the HME as Hops but I had no idea you have to adjust the AA% to get the IBU back to the original of the HME when you have added ingredients. Every one of my brews had added ingredients (DME and Steeping grains) so I need to adjust the IBU's on every one that I do.

If you use MrBeer HMEs, FIRST choose the HME from the list of HOPS, set it at 1 oz. for a 5 minute boil time and you should be all set for "straight up" batches.

One caveat when using QBrew with the HME's in this way, especially if you are making a modified recipe or some other form of BIG/High O.G. brew: When you select the Mr. Beer or other HME from the recipe list, it may not give you the full amount of IBU's that the HME will actually put into your batch of beer after you've added the other fermentables.

To get around this, add the HME as a hop first, before you add any malts, grains or other fermentables. Note the IBU value that QBrew calculates and write it down for reference.

Next, add in all of your fermentables. Now, go back to the hops tab and review the IBUs that QBrew is calculating for the HME.......and bump the AA% as necessary until you get the full amount of IBUs contained within the HME.

Finally, add in any other "real" hops that you might use for additional boil times or dry hopping, etc.

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=313140 said:

21 days is the default if you don't use a hydrometer. Hydrometer readings allow you to "know" when the fermentation is complete.

Not using one you are flying blind so the best way to make sure your fermentation is done is to go 21 days.

Then 4 weeks in bottles at room temp (no "cold conditioning" here!!), so call it the "3-4" like the famed Dick LeBeau defensive scheme.

Trub is the sediment in the bottom of the LBK....you've probably seen the layer forming. When you bottle, it will get into the bottles....there's no way to totally prevent that. Putting the CD cases (or shims) under the front side by the spigot helps the "junk" settle back away from the bottling spigot.


Is there anyway to sanitize a screen or something? I'm not sure I understand the CD case thing. Is the case under the spigot or inside the LBK at the back end of the spigot serving as a filter? I get the concept, I'm just trying to picture it, so bear w. me, lol.

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its under the front end of the lbk so as to make it have a slight tilt. Never ever put a cd in the lbk unless it is sanitized and holds hops :dry:

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Is there anyway to sanitize a screen or something? I'm not sure I understand the CD case thing. Is the case under the spigot or inside the LBK at the back end of the spigot serving as a filter?

It's outside the LBK under the front "foot".

Filtering or screening at that stage creates oxidation so it's not done.

You just have to be careful about how you are bottling and don;t stir the trub up.

The best way I have found to reduce trub in bottles is to cold crash the LBK three days before bottling day.

Stick it in the fridge and then pull it out, attach the spigot and bottle.

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Very well put Wings. To add to this concept, I also put the riser (cd case) under the spigot side of lbk while i am bottling and when the liquid drops down to the spigot after 14-15 .5 litre bottles, i move the riser to the back side of the lbk. After coldcrashing i get very little trub in my last (trub) bottle. If and when i do, it is always one of my best tasting bottles from that batch.

Great info n well put Wings again.

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=313142 said:

I've got another tip/trick for new brewers who may have just begun to use QBrew.
I'm not sure everyone understands this because, frankly, it's not the way it was explained to me when I asked the question in here. I knew the first part about adding the HME as Hops but I had no idea you have to adjust the AA% to get the IBU back to the original of the HME when you have added ingredients. Every one of my brews had added ingredients (DME and Steeping grains) so I need to adjust the IBU's on every one that I do.

If you use MrBeer HMEs, FIRST choose the HME from the list of HOPS, set it at 1 oz. for a 5 minute boil time and you should be all set for "straight up" batches.

One caveat when using QBrew with the HME's in this way, especially if you are making a modified recipe or some other form of BIG/High O.G. brew: When you select the Mr. Beer or other HME from the recipe list, it may not give you the full amount of IBU's that the HME will actually put into your batch of beer after you've added the other fermentables.

To get around this, add the HME as a hop first, before you add any malts, grains or other fermentables. Note the IBU value that QBrew calculates and write it down for reference.

Next, add in all of your fermentables. Now, go back to the hops tab and review the IBUs that QBrew is calculating for the HME.......and bump the AA% as necessary until you get the full amount of IBUs contained within the HME.

Finally, add in any other "real" hops that you might use for additional boil times or dry hopping, etc.

Definitely a useful tip, especially after our conversation in another thread yesterday. I think I'm going to have to re-enter my entire recipe, based on your helpful advice, to make sure that QBrew is spitting out the right numbers.

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Hi everyone. Wife just got me one of the kits for Christmas. Looking forward to take on another obsession. :charlie:

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center Bunqui. You will be assimilated. Resistance is Quite Futile: We have Beer.

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=313142 said:

I've got another tip/trick for new brewers who may have just begun to use QBrew.
I'm not sure everyone understands this because, frankly, it's not the way it was explained to me when I asked the question in here. I knew the first part about adding the HME as Hops but I had no idea you have to adjust the AA% to get the IBU back to the original of the HME when you have added ingredients. Every one of my brews had added ingredients (DME and Steeping grains) so I need to adjust the IBU's on every one that I do.

If you use MrBeer HMEs, FIRST choose the HME from the list of HOPS, set it at 1 oz. for a 5 minute boil time and you should be all set for "straight up" batches.

One caveat when using QBrew with the HME's in this way, especially if you are making a modified recipe or some other form of BIG/High O.G. brew: When you select the Mr. Beer or other HME from the recipe list, it may not give you the full amount of IBU's that the HME will actually put into your batch of beer after you've added the other fermentables.

To get around this, add the HME as a hop first, before you add any malts, grains or other fermentables. Note the IBU value that QBrew calculates and write it down for reference.

Next, add in all of your fermentables. Now, go back to the hops tab and review the IBUs that QBrew is calculating for the HME.......and bump the AA% as necessary until you get the full amount of IBUs contained within the HME.

Finally, add in any other "real" hops that you might use for additional boil times or dry hopping, etc.


Wings_Fan_In_KC good catch, not everyone is aware that qBrew will subtract IBUs as more malt and sugars are added which in effect reduces the bittering units of the hopped malt extracts. The IBU calculations at the top give the calculated bitterness of the entire recipe after all the ingredients have been added, including color and gravity.

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thanks for this....my first brew has been fermenting for 2 weeks and I'm dying to bottle it, but per your recommendation I'll let it sit for another week.

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Just wanted to introduce myself and thank everyone for all the great info. Just had elbow surgery so I should be able to get through every post on here before going back to work.

My first brew is on day 14 of fermenting and figured It wasn't going to be officially done until I was officially assimilated!

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First time here. I asked santa for a mr.beer. He didn't come thru. After Christmas the store I saw it in had one left. I jumped on it at 50% off. A lesson in patients I guess. I've yet to brew my first beer so I guess at this point my username is misleading. I have read alot. I'm sure I will learn alot here and at some point I hope to help those wearing the shoes I'm in now. Thank you all for having me.

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Just started my first batch of Patriot Lager. Very excited to taste the end result. Hands down my favorite Christmas gift in a long time.

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Being a new brewer... I have thousands of questions. However; I will save you from boredom. I do have one question and that is when is the right time to bottle? My beer has been fermenting now for about 2.5 weeks however still has a milky consistency. I'm still unable to shine a light through it. Does this mean I'm not ready to bottle? Any help would be appreciated....


Cheers!!!!

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Quick ? Tomorrow is day 21 fermenting. I had elbow surgery and can't use one arm yet. It's my 1st batch and don't want the wife messing it up. Lol. Will it hurt to leave it any longer in the LBK? Or should I bite the bullet and get her to help bottle?

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"Beer Me 34" post=320795 said:

Quick ? Tomorrow is day 21 fermenting. I had elbow surgery and can't use one arm yet. It's my 1st batch and don't want the wife messing it up. Lol. Will it hurt to leave it any longer in the LBK? Or should I bite the bullet and get her to help bottle?

You could leave it 4 weeks with no ill effects. I've heard 5 but I think that's pushing it.

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"MattC56" post=320734 said:

Being a new brewer... I have thousands of questions. However; I will save you from boredom. I do have one question and that is when is the right time to bottle? My beer has been fermenting now for about 2.5 weeks however still has a milky consistency. I'm still unable to shine a light through it. Does this mean I'm not ready to bottle? Any help would be appreciated....


Cheers!!!!

If you had read the links in this thread you would probably have stumbled upon what we call the "3-4" method.

3 weeks in the LBK
4 weeks in bottles conditioning at room temp (not in the fridge)

Then you put a few in the fridge for 2-3 days and drink 'em.

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"Beer Me 34" post=320795 said:

Quick ? Tomorrow is day 21 fermenting. I had elbow surgery and can't use one arm yet. It's my 1st batch and don't want the wife messing it up. Lol. Will it hurt to leave it any longer in the LBK? Or should I bite the bullet and get her to help bottle?

Sounds like a good bonding time to me. She bottles, u drink, that's a win win situation!

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New brewer here.

I brewed my first batch and it tastes a bit vinegary. I read that this could be from contaminants in the keg. I used the sanitizer as per instructions, including sanitizing all my tools. One thing I did notice is that there was still quite a bit of what may have been sanitizer undissolved in the bottom of the keg when I dumped it out (after running some of it through the spigot). Is this possibly where I went wrong? If so, is there a better way to ensure all the sanitizer dissolves, or is this powdery residue normal?

I have already learned quite a bit on here on time, as you guys indicate it takes a bit longer than the instructions indicate for all the steps in brewing/bottling/conditioning for best results. I have already purchases some more kits, and I'm looking forward to my next batches, using a longer fermenting/carbonation/conditioning timeline.

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The search on the forums is very rudimentary. Fortunately, the rulers of the world, Google, have a way around that.

If you want to search the forum, simply paste the following into a browser window (not including the quotes) -

"site:community.mrbeer.com/forum"

Then, hit the space bar after the word "forum" and type your search term, for example "when do I add LME"

That query brings up 4,520 results (right now, it will continue to grow), and they should be more relevant to your needs.

By the way, this works for any website.

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"RickBeer" post=321665 said:

The search on the forums is very rudimentary. Fortunately, the rulers of the world, Google, have a way around that.

If you want to search the forum, simply paste the following into a browser window (not including the quotes) -

"site:community.mrbeer.com/forum"

Then, hit the space bar after the word "forum" and type your search term, for example "when do I add LME"

That query brings up 4,520 results (right now, it will continue to grow), and they should be more relevant to your needs.

By the way, this works for any website.

Dude....that's awesome, I never knew that. You guys from Michigan aren't so bad!! :dry: :cheer: :laugh:

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"BlackDuck" post=321699 said:

Dude....that's awesome, I never knew that. You guys from Michigan aren't so bad!! :dry: :cheer: :laugh:

Glad to help despite it coming from a resident of OHIGHOH. :sick:

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=313140 said:

21 days is the default if you don't use a hydrometer. Hydrometer readings allow you to "know" when the fermentation is complete.

Not using one you are flying blind so the best way to make sure your fermentation is done is to go 21 days.

Then 4 weeks in bottles at room temp (no "cold conditioning" here!!), so call it the "3-4" like the famed Dick LeBeau defensive scheme.

Trub is the sediment in the bottom of the LBK....you've probably seen the layer forming. When you bottle, it will get into the bottles....there's no way to totally prevent that. Putting the CD cases (or shims) under the front side by the spigot helps the "junk" settle back away from the bottling spigot.

soo your saying to place a few CD cases under the front of the LBK to keep the bottom settiments from pouring into your bottles ? that sounds like a good idea. gonna bottle my beer tomorrow at the 21 day mark. :chug:

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"jorn lande" post=322043 said:


soo your saying to place a few CD cases under the front of the LBK to keep the bottom settiments from pouring into your bottles ? that sounds like a good idea. gonna bottle my beer tomorrow at the 21 day mark. :chug:

Yes, and no. You definitely want to do that on bottling day. However, you REALLY want to do it when you start the brewing process, so that all the trub settles to the back of the LBK from the get go. Then, keep them there while bottling. On your last bottle, open the lid and watch while you bottle and as the trub reaches the spigot stop.

Still use them when bottling this batch, it will help.

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"RickBeer" post=322048 said:

"jorn lande" post=322043 said:


soo your saying to place a few CD cases under the front of the LBK to keep the bottom settiments from pouring into your bottles ? that sounds like a good idea. gonna bottle my beer tomorrow at the 21 day mark. :chug:

Yes, and no. You definitely want to do that on bottling day. However, you REALLY want to do it when you start the brewing process, so that all the trub settles to the back of the LBK from the get go. Then, keep them there while bottling. On your last bottle, open the lid and watch while you bottle and as the trub reaches the spigot stop.

Still use them when bottling this batch, it will help.

will do rick beer, and i will certainly do this at the fermenting stage next batch. thanks.

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Got my first mrbeer kit for Christmas. First batch of Classic American light is into it's second week of fermentation. These forums are great!. I've learned a lot and plan to use the 3+4 schedule. Hopefully I'll catch up to my brother one of these days who has been into this for years now and is in the CO2 charged kegs in the garage fridge stage now.

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I'm one of the newbies who got their Mr Beer kit for Christmas. Joined the forum to learn and am taking my first tip from this post. The CD tip is perfect! Those are the little things that will help us all as we learn. Getting ready to start my first batch today. Thanks for the help.

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I suggest either:

1) A sticky at the top of this discussion forum define abbreviations (like LBK, HME); or
2) The Glossary be expanded to include abbreviations.

I could easily figure out from the context what LBK meant, but it took me a while to find out what the letters stood for.

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"11505rl" post=324299 said:

I suggest either:

1) A sticky at the top of this discussion forum define abbreviations (like LBK, HME); or
2) The Glossary be expanded to include abbreviations.

I could easily figure out from the context what LBK meant, but it took me a while to find out what the letters stood for.

Really? Great idea. Go to the first post of this thread, click on the links shown there and viola.....your wish has come true!

:pound:    DOH!    :pound:

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Hey all, just joined and have started my first batch. Mexican Cerveza, should be ready to bottle in a few days. Can't wait, I have asked for one of these kits for several years and finally got one on Christmas. It was the only thing I got. The info on this part of the forum has been great and really informative. Kudos to the MB who wrote it up. Now just one question, Where can I get the Mr. beer Book that I have read about?

Cheers,

Ray

P.S.

Can anyone direct me to some info on how to make Meade with the Beer kit?

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I got a book with my kit that was supposed to be worth $4.95.

You will learn more by reading the threads posted in here....trust me.

It's more of a pamphlet.

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I wonder if that would be the CD i got with mine. Haven't looked at that yet. Used the fold out paper quick start and info from the web site to get started. Guess I'll look at that sometime soon.

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By suggestions from Vet users here i let my beer ferment for 21 days in my Little Brown Keg , and then sugared the bottles and started conditioning the Beer at room temp in a dark closet, the beer is now 37 days old. 16 days conditioning now at room temp. Read here i should let it condition at room temp for 4 weeks, and THEN refrigerate it for "More Conditioning".

This sound right on track to you vets ? Want my Beer to be the best it can. :cheers:

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btw, grilled these 7 marinated Venison Tenderloin medallioms today, wish my beer was ready to go with them. :chow:

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"jorn lande" post=331774 said:

By suggestions from Vet users here i let my beer ferment for 21 days in my Little Brown Keg , and then sugared the bottles and started conditioning the Beer at room temp in a dark closet, the beer is now 37 days old. 16 days conditioning now at room temp. Read here i should let it condition at room temp for 4 weeks, and THEN refrigerate it for "More Conditioning".

This sound right on track to you vets ? Want my Beer to be the best it can. :cheers:

It's hard to go wrong using the 3 - 4 method.

That translates to 49 days total and you having only 12 days to go!!

After the 49 days are up you can chill it and drink it. No more conditioning after that but the longer they sit at room temp, the better they get.

On New Years Eve I had a bottle of a brew that I bottled in August. It was SUPERB.

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=331779 said:

"jorn lande" post=331774 said:

By suggestions from Vet users here i let my beer ferment for 21 days in my Little Brown Keg , and then sugared the bottles and started conditioning the Beer at room temp in a dark closet, the beer is now 37 days old. 16 days conditioning now at room temp. Read here i should let it condition at room temp for 4 weeks, and THEN refrigerate it for "More Conditioning".

This sound right on track to you vets ? Want my Beer to be the best it can. :cheers:

It's hard to go wrong using the 3 - 4 method.

That translates to 49 days total and you having only 12 days to go!!

After the 49 days are up you can chill it and drink it. No more conditioning after that but the longer they sit at room temp, the better they get.

On New Years Eve I had a bottle of a brew that I bottled in August. It was SUPERB.

awesome. can't wait to pop one open then. i appreciate all the help/replies here, this place rocks :cheers: .

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All of them.


Until you're not a nOOb anymore or have a hydrometer so you can be sure.

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Hello fellow brewers,

Received my first Mr. Brew at Christmas from my wife. Brewed up the American Light, fermented for 3 wks, conditioned for 2 wks. I only opened one bottle and it was a bit sugary, like sparkling brew. That was two weeks ago and I hope that some of that sweetness as conditioned out.

One question. has anyone activated the yeast packet prior to adding it to the wort? I think that my first batch did not activate fully.

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You mean rehydrated? A lot of us do that.

The basic MrBeer instructions say to just aerate the wort in the LBK and then sprinkle the yeast on top of the resultant foam.

Rehydrating is another step that needs to be carried out about 30 - 40 minutes before you are ready to pitch.

You boil a cup of water and then let it cool to 95-105F. Sprinkle yeast on top and gently stir to make sure all is wet then leave it for 15 minutes covered with sanitized foil. After 15 minutes you swirl it around and make sure it's all incorporated into the water and then cover it and wait another 15 minutes.

After that you can pitch.

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Okay I do have a Hydrometer, and will look for info on forum on how to use it. I have been checking my first batch regularly and see it changing. It will be 14 days next Tuesday. Haven't tasted it yet to see where it is at. Waiting for that 14th day, trying not to get to eager.

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Can one of the Admins create a list of acronyms for new brewers? Sometimes I'm not clear what LHBS and AG stands for...and I'm sure there are many others.

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21days and it's in the bottle now. Finally. Now I get to wait. I can see now I well need more than one going at a time. I think after the initial carbonation I will sample in stages. Unless it's really good. He he he.

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"Brewermike" post=334101 said:

21days and it's in the bottle now. Finally. Now I get to wait. I can see now I well need more than one going at a time. I think after the initial carbonation I will sample in stages. Unless it's really good. He he he.

Welcome to THE ADDICTION...

3 key words in homebrewing: Sanitization, Patience & SWMBO.

Your homebrew gets better by the week so that is why it is important to have at least 3 lbk's going so as to build up the pipeline and maintain the pipeline.

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Hi all. Received a kit for my b-day, got the flu, and now that I'm better I can't wait to dig in and start the addiction.
I'm reading and gathering all the information I can. The patience part will be difficult.

Bill

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Just started brewing. First batch is one week in the LBK. Very excited to start this adventure!

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"Mike Lucia" post=344102 said:

Just started brewing. First batch is one week in the LBK. Very excited to start this adventure!

Good! Read this entire thread from beginning to end including the links.

Read this too: How To Brew

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Today marks my second week into fermentation, so now I have wait another week to bottle. So you guys are saying, once the bottling is done I let it condition at room temp for another additional 4 weeks ?

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SalvadorianBrewer,

YES, 4 weeks at room temps (68-70*f) to properly carbonate and condition. This lets the cidery taste subside and the true beer flavors come through.

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Great forum! My wife gave me a Mr Beer kit for Christmas, as I see so many have too. She may regret getting me into this... I Thought I would just follow the instructions in the kit and see what I got. After brewing the American Light that came with the kit, I followed the recommended 2-2-2 rule, but tasting it at different stages to see how it was going. It had a darker color and distinct cidery-flavor after 2 weeks of fermenting and 2 weeks carbonating, but after two weeks conditioning it seems to have better flavor and lighter in color. Not great, but hey, it's my first attempt at home brewing.
I bought some more HME, figuring I could do better the second time around, and have the Canadian Blonde fermenting now. I will definitely let this one go three weeks fermenting before bottling. Maybe I haven't looked through the forum enough, but what is a good priming sugar? I used ordinary table sugar on the first batch, but thought it made it too sweet. What are my options for priming sugars and methods?
Thanks!
[attachment=11977]image.jpg[/attachment]

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Welcome! As you look through the forum more you'll learn:

a) It doesn't matter what sugar you use, it imparts no flavor to the brew.

B) Using ordinary table sugar is the way to go - other more expensive sugars are simply more expensive, they yield no different results.

www.screwybrewer.com to figure the right amount of sugar, Mr. Beer's levels are too highly carbonated for most.

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"Beermonkey" post=348239 said:

Great forum! My wife gave me a Mr Beer kit for Christmas, as I see so many have too. She may regret getting me into this... I Thought I would just follow the instructions in the kit and see what I got. After brewing the American Light that came with the kit, I followed the recommended 2-2-2 rule, but tasting it at different stages to see how it was going. It had a darker color and distinct cidery-flavor after 2 weeks of fermenting and 2 weeks carbonating, but after two weeks conditioning it seems to have better flavor and lighter in color. Not great, but hey, it's my first attempt at home brewing.
I bought some more HME, figuring I could do better the second time around, and have the Canadian Blonde fermenting now. I will definitely let this one go three weeks fermenting before bottling. Maybe I haven't looked through the forum enough, but what is a good priming sugar? I used ordinary table sugar on the first batch, but thought it made it too sweet. What are my options for priming sugars and methods?
Thanks!
[attachment=11977]image.jpg[/attachment]

[attachment=11979]HOMER_2013-03-09.jpg[/attachment]


Nothing wrong with using table sugar to prime with. The yeasties will eat it up and take care of any sweetness it puts into the beer. (It's what they eat to produce the CO2 for the carbonation.) Alot of guys use corn sugar. As you get more and more in to this obsession - and you WILL ;) - you can start batch priming. That's where you transfer your beer at bottling time into another vessel (I use another LBK) and add a predetermined amount of priming material (I use DME) as it's being transferred. Much easier than measuring into each bottle and much more consistent results.

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I wish I would have joined the community sooner. Being a such a noob, I couldn't figure out why the beer had a sugary taste to it after carbonating for two weeks. Have the third batch conditioning and the fourth and fifth fermenting, now that I have a better idea of what to expect. I have 3 kits and hope to get a consistent beer flow going.

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I'm a new brewer and totally addicted. (I'm at work now, browsing these forums!) I have 2 kits and 3 batches going.

Currently:
Classic American Light - 2 weeks fermented, almost 2 weeks carbonating
Cowgirl Honey Light - almost 3 weeks fermenting
Canadian Blonde - almost 2 weeks fermenting

I am trying to read everything so that I don't ask questions that are already covered in the forums. I'm so anxious that I snuck a taste of the Light already. It was pretty cidery (reminded me of Apple Wine that I drank in Frankfurt) but I'm learning from the FAQs that it's probably because I was sneaking an early taste. I'm hoping it mellows with conditioning. I've noticed that the Cowgirl Honey Light is still not very clear, even coming up on 3 weeks in the keg. I probably should have stuck to more basic recipes at first. Anyway, just rambling.

I notice sugar sitting at the bottom of the bottles. Should I have shaken the wort with the sugar immediately after bottling? The instructions indicate not to shake, to carefully add the wort on top of the sugar. If it shold have been shaken, is it too late now? I'm really trying to follow instructions as precisely as possible.

Thanks, guys. What a great community. No flaming the new guys, no haters. Just a really cool group.

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