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vitch61

2-2-2 Questions

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Does the last "2" in 2-2-2 mean in the refrigerator with these simple Mr. Beer refills? Does anyone here NOT cold condition in the fridge? The reason why I bring this up is that my best tasting beers are not the ones I've been cold conditioning. I just bring up a few beers in the morning to put in the fridge, and then drink same in the evening. Thanks in advance for your input.

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The final 2 is two weeks at room temperature. The beer flavors need to blend and mellow a little, and doing so at room temperature is recommended. Cold conditioning after this is not a bad thing, though. I'd rather drink a beer that's fermented 3 weeks, carbed and conditioned for at least four weeks at room temperature, then was cold conditioned for three days to a week.

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"FedoraDave" post=309296 said:

The final 2 is two weeks at room temperature. The beer flavors need to blend and mellow a little, and doing so at room temperature is recommended. Cold conditioning after this is not a bad thing, though. I'd rather drink a beer that's fermented 3 weeks, carbed and conditioned for at least four weeks at room temperature, then was cold conditioned for three days to a week.

+1

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it seems last years batch of new brewers is starting to use the 3-4 method of describing the fermenting and carbing/conditioning phase.

it is basically the same as 3-2-2, however, it is based on a football play. 3-4, 3 weeks in the fermentor and 4 weeks in the bottle at room temp then a day to a week in the fridge for "cold conditioning" or just cooling before drinking.

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Yeah, Brian, I kind of think of it as 3-4 myself, even though I refer to it as 3-2-2. In discussions, I use 3-2-2 because of the three more-or-less distinct phases, fermenting, carbing, and conditioning. But in my mind and in practice, it's the time spent in each vessel. Three in the fermenter, then bottle and set aside for at least four weeks.

Six of one, half-dozen of the other, I suppose.

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"FedoraDave" post=309355 said:

Three in the fermenter, then bottle and set aside for at least four weeks.

Six of one, half-dozen of the other, I suppose.

Ditto to the 'Hat'. 3-4 here, have produced the best/better results.

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Yeah, I use the 3-4 method....ever since I learned of it on this very forum.

We started calling it the "3-4" like the famous NFL Defensive Scheme pioneered by Dick LeBeau.

EDIT: IPA's and Wheat beers can be done on the 3-3 method. The Wheats don't need as much time to condition and IPA's are best when younger before the hops begin to fade.

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3-4 definitely makes sense to a new brewer but its nice to understand that 3-2-2 means that there are three different phases going on.

Took me a few days to understand it 100%, but I like the 3-4 convention honestly - just a bit simpler to describe.

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+1 on the 3-4.
Then when you start getting into higher gravity and use more adjuncts in can turn into 3- 26...
as it will take longer to condition out the added adjuncts and let the beer meld it's flavors. Some on here, me included have tested our patience 6 months to a year. I thought I read someone had a 2 year old on here...

But until you get the process down with standard brews, remember 3-4...

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Could go with 21-14-14 in days or 504-336-336 in hours, depending on how fixated you are on the patience-patience-patience... :P

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I try to do a 3-6-1 rotation; 3 weeks fermenting followed by 6 weeks carbonating and conditioning in the bottle and then finished up with 1 week in the refrigerator.

I know it's hard for a new brewer but with a little determination, a whole lot of patience and several trips to the local beer store you'll get that pipeline built up and never have to wait for great beer again.

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"Chuck N" post=309453 said:

I try to do a 3-6-1 rotation; 3 weeks fermenting followed by 6 weeks carbonating and conditioning in the bottle and then finished up with 1 week in the refrigerator.

I know it's hard for a new brewer but with a little determination, a whole lot of patience and several trips to the local beer store you'll get that pipeline built up and never have to wait for great beer again.

I'm with Chuck on this one. Substitute 8 or 10 for the 6 with a beer over 6% ABV. As much as six months (to five years*) for a beer over 8% ABV. You'll be glad you did, but it's never a bad idea to open one now and then to see how they progress.

*Thomas Hardy's barley wine is not put out to market until it has aged five years. Don't pass up the opportunity to try one if you ever have the chance. Brewing a beer like that is tricky though, best to master the basics first.

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I agree on the sample.... a new brewer should "see" waht a difference patience and extra conditioning make. This is primarily for higher gravity beers. Hoppy brews should be enjoyed at a young age as the hops disapate with age. remeber, there are exceptions to the rules...

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There's no doubt that most beers will benefit from extended conditioning time. Before I had a pipeline really built up, I would read bpgreen's posts on how he prefers to let his beers condition for four months, and I'd think "How can he even wait that long?!" But having managed to do it myself, I have to say he was right. After three or four months, most of my beers were greatly improved.

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"FedoraDave" post=309355 said:

Yeah, Brian, I kind of think of it as 3-4 myself, even though I refer to it as 3-2-2. In discussions, I use 3-2-2 because of the three more-or-less distinct phases, fermenting, carbing, and conditioning. But in my mind and in practice, it's the time spent in each vessel. Three in the fermenter, then bottle and set aside for at least four weeks.

Six of one, half-dozen of the other, I suppose.

+1

It's easier to think of it as 3-4. Either way, if you're doing 2-2-2, that last two is NOT in the fridge. It's still at room temperature.

That said, bottle conditioned beer is best served after at least 24 hours in the fridge to help solidify any trub that may have transferred into the bottle and for the sediment to fall out of suspension so that your beer pours clearer. 48 hours is better if you can wait that long.

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