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bni

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Hello,
My name is Paul. Been checking out the forum for a while. And finally decided to join.

First few batches came out great. Now trying my hand at more advanced recipes.
Doing a Guiness clone recipe from my local homebrew store tomorrow. Hopefully 2.5 gallons goes ok in the LBK.

Currently using 3 LBK's. Should keep the pipeline moving.

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Hello, Paul. And welcome to the forum and welcome to the obsession.

It sounds as though you might already be more than just a n00by brewer. If you're doing a Guinness clone that makes a five gallon batch (and my money says that's what it is) and you have two open LBKs then you can always split it between them. A lot of guys here do that.

Let us (ME especially :P ) know how it turns out.

Oh! And don't forget to include the recipe.

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Thanks Chuck,

It is a 2.5 gallon batch. I had the guy at my local store cut the recipe for me.
Yes I have brewed with a local friend of mine quite a few times. But he kegs everything. I have no room for that. But wanted to have some bottled for home.

I will definitely share the recipe. Probably won't have time until tomorrow after brewing.

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I am really into Porters, and Stouts.
In two weeks I will be doing a coconut porter recipe that is a favorite of mine.

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Welcome aboard The Obsession bni! If you're like the rest of us here you'll soon be awash in a sea of beer and setting sail on many great brewing adventures. There's lot's of information here and plenty of hands to help you get under way. You'll soon be producing some memorable beers and having a lot of fun too in the days ahead.

Navigate on over to our Advanced Brewing Techniques area of the forum and read over the

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417" target="_blank" title="http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417">'4 Things Every Brewer Should Know About Yeast'

sticky. Yeast is a living cell, keep them healthy and they'll ferment you up some awesome tasting beers.

Set your course and sail on over to our New Brewers and FAQs area of the forum and read over the 'Malt To Adjunct Ratios' sticky.

Remember for the best tasting beer you'll want no less than 66% of the alcohol to come from malts and no more than 33% of the alcohol to come from sugars or other adjuncts.

When using a priming calculator enter the warmest temperature that your fermenting beer has endured between the time you pitched your yeast until bottling day. The reason for this is residual Co2, or the ability for a liquid to absorb Co2 during fermentation. For a typical Ale fermenting around 70F the residual Co2 will be around .83 volumes, which is then subtracted from whatever Co2 level you entered as your target.


Example 1: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 70F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 2: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 60F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 3: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 80F - Enter 80F for the temperature

Higher levels of Co2 will stay in solution when the liquid is colder while releasing Co2 from solution as the liquid warms. Hope that helps.


This is my glass of beer. There are many like it, but this one is mine. Without me my beer is useless. Without my beer, I am useless. ~ Screwy Brewer

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center bni. You will be assimilated. Resistance is Quite Futile: WE have Beer.

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Guest

Should I post the Guiness half batch recipe here?
Or should I post it in another thread?

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