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bni

Ferment ??

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My 5 gallon batches were always a 2 week fermentation.
Why 3 weeks for the Mr. Beer fermenter?
What is the gain?

Just wondering.

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"bni" post=323203 said:

My 5 gallon batches were always a 2 week fermentation.
Why 3 weeks for the Mr. Beer fermenter?
What is the gain?

Just wondering.

There are a ton of posts about the Borg's recommended 3-2-2 (3 weeks fermenting, 2 weeks in bottles to carbonate and 2 weeks in bottles to condition) - all at room temps.

It comes down to a few things - the yeast gets time to clean up, and most/many Mr. Beer users don't have a hydrometer to test the beer and then retest it 2 days later to see if fermentation is done. At 2 weeks sometimes it isn't done, and it hasn't had time to clean up. My first batches, 2 weeks fermenting, were no where near as good as later batches.

Most importantly, there is a focus on success. People who cut short the time period often get beer that doesn't meet their expectations, and then they quit.

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Without a hydrometer, the 3 week method is a safe and conservative time frame. Even 5 gallon batches would benefit (or at least be okay) from a 3 week fermentation. That way you can be confident that fermentation is over and you wont get bottle bombs (among other things). Just to clarify, MrB instructions state that the beer is ready to bottle in 7 days. The 3 weeks is the recommendation from the Borg. The "better safe than sorry" philosophy. Sometimes I bottle after 14 days, sometimes I let it go the full 3 weeks....this is true for all of my batches (LBK and 5 gallon batches). HTH. Cheers!

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I'm a MrBeer guy and almost always go with 10 - 14 days fermenting. Most of the experienced brewers here recommend 3 weeks so the yeast can "clean" up after themselves. I figure after the yeast eat all the sugar and the FG is stable they can clean up after themselves in the bottle while conditioning. That way I can get that LBK back in action sooner. Just a rebel by nature I guess.

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"mrblase" post=323208 said:

I'm a MrBeer guy and almost always go with 10 - 14 days fermenting. Most of the experienced brewers here recommend 3 weeks so the yeast can "clean" up after themselves. I figure after the yeast eat all the sugar and the FG is stable they can clean up after themselves in the bottle while conditioning. That way I can get that LBK back in action sooner. Just a rebel by nature I guess.

I too have stuck with 2 weeks for fermentation and have been pretty happy with the results. Having 2 LBKs the 2 week schedule worked out well and let me bottle one and brew another batch every weekend which built my pipeline up quickly and allowed plenty of time for conditioning.

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"LouieMacGoo" post=323214 said:

"mrblase" post=323208 said:

I'm a MrBeer guy and almost always go with 10 - 14 days fermenting. Most of the experienced brewers here recommend 3 weeks so the yeast can "clean" up after themselves. I figure after the yeast eat all the sugar and the FG is stable they can clean up after themselves in the bottle while conditioning. That way I can get that LBK back in action sooner. Just a rebel by nature I guess.

I too have stuck with 2 weeks for fermentation and have been pretty happy with the results. Having 2 LBKs the 2 week schedule worked out well and let me bottle one and brew another batch every weekend which built my pipeline up quickly and allowed plenty of time for conditioning.

+1 to Louie and MrBlase!

I bottle as soon as the FG is stable and I have time to bottle. Like has been said, the 3 week timeline is more precautionary for newer brewers who may not have a hydrometer and who want to be certain that primary fermentation has completed.

I don't buy the whole "clean up" thing either. The yeast can "clean up" in the bottle just as easily as in the LBK. Get that beer in the bottles as soon as possible and get more been in the LBK is the way I prefer to do it! :banana:

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Most of the 5 gallon recipes I've seen suggest 3-4 weeks fermentation though many usually say 2 weeks primary and 1-2 weeks secondary and many no longer use a secondary.
I go 3 weeks on just about every batch except for the very light beers and other specialty beers. 2 weeks should be fine but your own personal taste should be the judge of how long you ferment, carb and condition.

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Before I had a hydrometer I always gave it 3 weeks.
Now I bottle when it's steady, need my fermenters open ASAP!

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"Beer-lord" post=323224 said:

Most of the 5 gallon recipes I've seen suggest 3-4 weeks fermentation though many usually say 2 weeks primary and 1-2 weeks secondary and many no longer use a secondary.
I go 3 weeks on just about every batch except for the very light beers and other specialty beers. 2 weeks should be fine but your own personal taste should be the judge of how long you ferment, carb and condition.


The 5 gal recipe I just bought says 2 weeks in primary and 1-2 secondary and if you're not usinga secondary to leave it in primary for an extra week.

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I too am new to brewing with Mr. Beer. I started my first batch on Jan. 4, with West Coast Pale Ale. Today will be day 17 of the fermentation process.

I have been reviewing the posts and frankly I don't know when I should bottle. Some say 2 weeks after being in the LBK others say 3 weeks if I don't have a hydrometer.

I plan on splitting the difference and bottle either tomorrow or Wednesday (day 18 or 19 of fermentation).

My batch has been fermenting in a cooler at about 71 degrees....am I OK?

Thanks.

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"Norseman" post=323269 said:

I too am new to brewing with Mr. Beer. I started my first batch on Jan. 4, with West Coast Pale Ale. Today will be day 17 of the fermentation process.

I have been reviewing the posts and frankly I don't know when I should bottle. Some say 2 weeks after being in the LBK others say 3 weeks if I don't have a hydrometer.

I plan on splitting the difference and bottle either tomorrow or Wednesday (day 18 or 19 of fermentation).

My batch has been fermenting in a cooler at about 71 degrees....am I OK?

Thanks.

You should be just fine. Take a small sample and see if it tastes like flat beer (i.e. not sweet).
Sweetness indicates that you still have sugars left to ferment but at that temp for that time I would be surprised if you aren't ready to bottle.

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The best way is to get a stable hydrometer reading for 2 or 3 days in a row, but with that said there are a ton of variables leading up to that point, mostly having to do with the cell count and viability of the yeast used to ferment your beer.

With a good pitch of yeast and the right conditions I'd expect the primary fermentation to be complete within a week, leaving another full week for the yeast to clean up a bit before moving your beer off of the yeast cake. But experience shows that new brewers often don't get the best fermentations so they're beer can benefit from an extended fermentation.

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"bni" post=323272 said:

Wasn't trying to stir the pot.
Just curious.

No Worries! It's a good debate and if someone learns something from the discussion and becomes a better brewer, that makes it all good!

:cheers:

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My beers are on a 3-week rotation. I have 2 LBKs and a 5-gallon carboy, so 3 weeks means I'm bottling and brewing every weekend. And I like the assurance that 3 weeks is definitely going to produce a fully fermented beer.

But beyond that, I do feel it "cleans up" the beer, in a way that bottle conditioning doesn't. Before I went 3-4, I was usually aware of "extract twang" in my Mr. Beer recipes, even after extended bottle time. In fairness, a lot of my procedures have changed over the past year or so, including using an auto-siphon to rack to the priming bucket, even with my LBK batches, as well as using extra Fromunda packets before the Cooper's change. So some of the improvements may be attributed to those things. But I do feel it's worth it to give it three weeks before bottling. It doesn't hurt it, and since my rotation is three weeks anyway, it still keeps the pipeline humming along nicely.

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I do my batches, 5 to 10 gallon, this way 1 week in the primary (don't even check the gravity) transfer to secondary till finished or 3 weeks (which ever comes last) With pilsners I transfer to a corny to lager, under pressure. Ales go into the corny, carb and drink

The fast I have reached FG 24 hrs the longest 3 1/2 months.

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"Beer-lord" post=323224 said:

Most of the 5 gallon recipes I've seen suggest 3-4 weeks fermentation though many usually say 2 weeks primary and 1-2 weeks secondary and many no longer use a secondary.
I go 3 weeks on just about every batch except for the very light beers and other specialty beers. 2 weeks should be fine but your own personal taste should be the judge of how long you ferment, carb and condition.


+1 on what beerloard said.
I do mostly 5 gal lately and have been using a secondary some. But if you aren't monitoring with a hydrometer, 3 weeks should be a safe zone. 2 weeks, yea but how you know if you don't take a reading?

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Thanks for all of the advice everyone. Since I'm so close to the end of the 3rd week in the LBK, I'm going to bottle on day 21; this Friday.

I plan to keep in bottle for 4 weeks at about 70 degrees before I put the first one in the fridge.

Thanks again. :drinking:

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"Norseman" post=324767 said:

Thanks for all of the advice everyone. Since I'm so close to the end of the 3rd week in the LBK, I'm going to bottle on day 21; this Friday.

I plan to keep in bottle for 4 weeks at about 70 degrees before I put the first one in the fridge.

Thanks again. :drinking:

Sounds like a plan.

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Thanks for all the input; I bottled my first batch of West Coast Pale Ale yesterday (Friday). A sample tasted like flat beer (which is good), and the batch is now carbanating/conditioning for 4 weeks before I refridgerate and try the first one.

I bottled in 12 oz bottles (been collecting) and the LBK provided enough for 22 bottles, I was hoping for 24 or a case. Is this common with LBK 8.5 gallon batches?

For my next batch I plan to make the American Porter. Does anyone have any recommendations for this type of beer; fermenting time, conditioning, addatives, etc.

Thanks to all of the knowledgeable people in this forum, I have learned a lot in the last few weeks.

Skoal! :drinking:

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"Norseman" post=326657 said:

Thanks for all the input; I bottled my first batch of West Coast Pale Ale yesterday (Friday). A sample tasted like flat beer (which is good), and the batch is now carbanating/conditioning for 4 weeks before I refridgerate and try the first one.

I bottled in 12 oz bottles (been collecting) and the LBK provided enough for 22 bottles, I was hoping for 24 or a case. Is this common with LBK 8.5 gallon batches?

For my next batch I plan to make the American Porter. Does anyone have any recommendations for this type of beer; fermenting time, conditioning, addatives, etc.

Thanks to all of the knowledgeable people in this forum, I have learned a lot in the last few weeks.

Skoal! :drinking:

8.5 Qts not gallons

8.5 qts = 272 oz.

272 / 12 = 22.667 Bottles

So you'll always get about 22, 12 ounce bottles.. In a perfect bottling day..

~worm

p.s. Welcome to the forum!

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