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bagwellhick

need help please

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i have just purchased a mr.beerand was wondering what would be close to a guinnes extra stout. this is for my wifes 97 year old grandfather. he likes his own home brew but it smells up the house so i thought i would try this. any help would be appreciated

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Mimicking Guinness is tough because there is really no way for a homebrewer to do the nitrogen carbonation.

However, just from a basic refill standpoint, you should try the Deluxe St. Patrick's Irish Stout refill:

http://www.mrbeer.com/product-exec/product_id/1122/nm/St_Patrick_s_Irish_Stout_Deluxe_Refill_

Make's a pretty good stout!

Welcome aboard and have fun!

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You are not going to make anything exactly like Guinness since they use their nitrogen process to produce the bubbles in its brew. You will only be able to make a carbonated brew. St. Patrick's stout (a HME = hopped malt extract) can be used with additional malts (DME = Dry malt extract or LME = Liquid malt extract) to make a good stout. The Winter Dark Ale also is a decent stout. And:


[attachment=10890]Welcome09_2013-02-04.gif[/attachment]

to the Borg!

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Guest System Admin

What they said.

I agree that the St Pat's Irish Stout Deluxe refill is your best bet for a MrBeer recipe.

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Welcome aboard The Obsession bagwellhick! If you're like the rest of us here you'll soon be awash in a sea of beer and setting sail on many great brewing adventures. There's lot's of information here and plenty of hands to help you get under way. You'll soon be producing some memorable beers and having a lot of fun too in the days ahead.

Navigate on over to our Advanced Brewing Techniques area of the forum and read over the

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417" target="_blank" title="http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417">'4 Things Every Brewer Should Know About Yeast'

sticky. Yeast is a living cell, keep them healthy and they'll ferment you up some awesome tasting beers.

Set your course and sail on over to our New Brewers and FAQs area of the forum and read over the 'Malt To Adjunct Ratios' sticky.

Remember for the best tasting beer you'll want no less than 80% of the alcohol to come from malts and no more than 20% of the alcohol to come from sugars or other adjuncts.

When using any priming calculator enter the warmest temperature that your fermenting beer has endured between the time you pitched your yeast until bottling day. The reason for this is residual Co2, or the ability for a liquid to absorb Co2 during fermentation. For a typical Ale fermenting around 70F the residual Co2 will be around .83 volumes, which is then subtracted from whatever Co2 level you entered as your target.


Batch Priming Using LBKs
Example 1: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 70F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 2: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 60F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 3: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 80F - Enter 80F for the temperature

Higher levels of Co2 will stay in solution when the liquid is colder while releasing Co2 from solution as the liquid warms. Hope that helps.

This is my glass of beer. There are many like it, but this one is mine. Without me my beer is useless. Without my beer, I am useless. ~ Screwy Brewer

Congratulations, hats off to your grandfather! Like the others said go with a St. Pat's Irish Stout it's the closest MB recipe out there.

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Besides the nitrogen thing, there's another component of Guiness Draft that is hard to replicate. I believe I read that it's a sour mash. They keep a little of each mash, let it sour, and put it in the next mash before the boil. Prolly a fine art, takes experimentation to get the amounts/methods down.

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Guest System Admin

I believe you to be absolutely correct, Tom.

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