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KEY WEST DOUG

To stir or not after adding yeast?

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It all seems to be personal preference. A lot of folks here don't stir after pitching. I do, personally, since when I got my first kit, the instructions stated to do so. So it stuck and I do. Ultimately, if after 8 hours or more after pitching you see trub building and bubbles rising, you know the yeast is working and you're making beer.

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I stir only because im fidgety and a tinkerer(if thats a word)and its never effected my beer yet. :gulp:

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"Elsteve-o" post=335337 said:

I stir only because im fidgety and a tinkerer(if thats a word)... :gulp:

Lol~ :laugh:

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Hmm... I thought about this, the instructions didnt mention it. I may try this next batch. I'm afraid that the yeast will get caught in the krausen and get stuck to the sides.

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"GodSpeed005" post=335441 said:

Hmm... I thought about this, the instructions didnt mention it. I may try this next batch. I'm afraid that the yeast will get caught in the krausen and get stuck to the sides.

There is no Krausen for the yeast to get stuck in. The yeast makes the Krausen.

Stir or don't stir. You'll still get beer. I stir every batch. 13 so far.

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I've done both and had good results with both. I believe that a very vigorous aeration before is the key.

According to the Fermentis spec sheet for US-05:

"Alternatively, pitch the yeast directly in the fermentation vessel providing the temperature of the wort is above 20°C (68°F). Progressively sprinkle the dry yeast into the wort ensuring the yeast covers all the surface of wort available in order to avoid clumps. Leave for 30 minutes, then mix the wort using aeration or by wort addition"

I've followed that procedure and had excellent results. The last time I used this procedure, my lag time was less than 12 hours.


Rick

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My 2 batches I didn't stir, then last batch I just did stir. I thinks it one of those do it if you want to either way you still get beer.

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Ah maybe I misinterpreted the definition of krausen. I meant in the foam at the top after aerating the wort. In regards to another beginners post I made lol

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"GodSpeed005" post=335472 said:

Ah maybe I misinterpreted the definition of krausen. I meant in the foam at the top after aerating the wort. In regards to another beginners post I made lol

froth

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"KEY WEST DOUG" post=335318 said:

I've seen conflicting information - should you stir or not after adding the yeast? Or does it even matter?

I will usually stir before, but I don't think it really matters.

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Guest

I stir the poop out of it before before pitching, wait 5 or 10 minutes then stir again, mostly out of habbit. The directions for the older kits with 2 grams of yeast instead of the new kits with 5 gram packs, said to stir after 5 minutes. Just got to be a habbit. I have not noticed a problem stiring the new kits after pitching.

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"GodSpeed005" post=335472 said:

Ah maybe I misinterpreted the definition of krausen. I meant in the foam at the top after aerating the wort. In regards to another beginners post I made lol

Don't worry about RickBeer. He's the resident grammar police. Wants to make sure everyone says everything just the way he likes it…and is very quick to point out others mistakes with much gusto.
:whistle:

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"FrozenInTime" post=335511 said:

I stir the poop out of it before before pitching, wait 5 or 10 minutes then stir again, mostly out of habbit. The directions for the older kits with 2 grams of yeast instead of the new kits with 5 gram packs, said to stir after 5 minutes. Just got to be a habbit. I have not noticed a problem stiring the new kits after pitching.

There is no poop in my beer......unless its a version of Mashani's Catt Butt Duseldorf Altbier.

LOL

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Guest System Admin

LOL, I wondered after typing that how long it would take... 20 minutes.... your quick!

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Some observations:

1 - You will get beer whether you stir or not.

B - Some of us do it because we've always done it.

iii - Yeast works better in an oxygenated environment, and stirring introduces more oxygen into the wort.

Four - The instructions may have changed because the kits now include more than twice the yeast they used to.

V - RDWHAHB

I also rehydrate the yeast any time I use dry yeast. Is there an advantage to this? I don't know, but I do it anyway. It may not be helping my beer, but it's fer damsher not hurting it.

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I've been brewing since June 2011 and I stir every single batch...roughly 150-200 gallons worth

Dave's point:
iii - Yeast works better in an oxygenated environment, and stirring introduces more oxygen into the wort.
...was given to me when I first started and I err on the side that this is right.

Not saying it's the only way...just the reason I err on that side.

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I think stirring is in the instructions as a means of areating your wort. It says to wait 5 minutes or something like that then stir vigorously. And I am pretty sure the instructions mention something about areating the wort as being part of the reason of stirring. It has been 3 years since I read them but you might take another look at them.

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"FedoraDave" post=335545 said:


I also rehydrate the yeast any time I use dry yeast. Is there an advantage to this? I don't know, but I do it anyway. It may not be helping my beer, but it's fer damsher not hurting it.

I also rehydrate dry yeast before pitching. Everything I've read about the topic indicates that the process prepares the yeast cell membranes for contact with the sugar-rich environment of the wort. That causes a much higher percentage of them to survive the initial stages, giving you more (and healthier) cells to multiply.

Rehydrating, pitching in the mid-60's and attemperating the yeast slurry to the wort temp (to within 10*F) are all good practices to follow IMO.

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I also rehydrate dry yeast before pitching. Everything I've read about the topic indicates that the process prepares the yeast cell membranes for contact with the sugar-rich environment of the wort. That causes a much higher percentage of them to survive the initial stages, giving you more (and healthier) cells to multiply.

+100

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I guess I'm just overly concerned - it's just my nature. I'm running 5 kegs with new recipes almost every day. No problems so far, but I would hate to waste a good batch of beer!

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I don't stir/aerate until I've pitched my yeast, mainly because on rare occasions I don't rehydrate my dry yeast and want to make sure that it is in contact with the liquid wort and not lying on a froth. After pitching I use an electric whisk for several minutes, or use a sintered stone with O2 canister.

You can brew beer without aerating, BUT it will take longer to ferment, be more estery, and my not attenuate as fully. Aerating a lot can result in a quick fermentation, but it will also make temperature control more difficult because that yeast can generate a good deal of it's own heat, which can also result in estery flavors. A fast fermenting beer can easily rise to over 72* in a 62* room. The trick for many of us is to get that vigorous healthy fermentation while still keeping those rowdy lusty yeast on a short leash...er, or something. Cool. B)

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