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kmccarthy27

IPA question

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So I made the following recipe:

Pilsen Light DME - 3lbs
Crystal 60L - .31lbs

US05 Yeast

Nugget Hops:
.5oz @ 60
.25oz @ 20, 10, 5
.5oz @ Flameout
No dry hop

SG: 1.061

Its been fermenting for 18 days now and I took a hydrometer measurement and its clocking in at 1.012. I am thinking the fermentation is done. In tasting the hydrometer sample, I am not getting any hoppy-ness taste I was expecting for an IPA. The only hoppy-ness I get was almost in the after taste.

Is that taste going to develop more when I bottle it? Should I bottle it?
Could the Crystal 60 flavors overtake the hops.

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Bottle it, nuttin u can do about it now. I would have gone a little heavier on the flavor boil. The flavors will develop some in the bottle, drink at 4 weeks or you will start losing the hopiness you have now.

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I'm no big IPA person, but it does seem to me like one ounce total for 3 plus lbs of malt would make for a fairly mild hops experience. That's about what I would put for a balanced brew. I'm not saying it won't be a delicious beer at all. I'm sure it will. I'm just not sure it will be a hop forward beer. You could plug the malt and hops into a software program to get an idea of what kind of IBU you might be looking at.

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"Joechianti" post=335605 said:

I'm no big IPA person, but it does seem to me like one ounce total for 3 plus lbs of malt would make for a fairly mild hops experience. That's about what I would put for a balanced brew. I'm not saying it won't be a delicious beer at all. I'm sure it will. I'm just not sure it will be a hop forward beer. You could plug the malt and hops into a software program to get an idea of what kind of IBU you might be looking at.

It was actually 1.75oz

.5oz @ 60
.25oz @ 20
.25oz @ 10
.25oz @ 5
.5oz @ Flameout

Nugget has a AA of around 13 which is why I thought it would be more hoppy

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"haerbob3" post=335607 said:

you can do a hop tea if you batch prime that will add a lot of hop flavor and aroma

Do you have directions on that?

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Hop tea will work well, you wont have to wait to dry hop it.

But I noticed you said it's been fermenting for 18 day, you could thow in a half oz of hops and leave them in for a week and then bottle.

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I tend to use quite a bit more hopping for an IPA, probably around seven ounces average (for five gallons). Using "C" hops with them will give you more of that American IPA character too.

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"jivex5k" post=335626 said:

Hop tea will work well, you wont have to wait to dry hop it.

But I noticed you said it's been fermenting for 18 day, you could thow in a half oz of hops and leave them in for a week and then bottle.

I fear dry hopping, the two times I did it I got infections (and all I did was toss in the hops?)

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"kmccarthy27" post=335661 said:

"jivex5k" post=335626 said:

Hop tea will work well, you wont have to wait to dry hop it.

But I noticed you said it's been fermenting for 18 day, you could thow in a half oz of hops and leave them in for a week and then bottle.

I fear dry hopping, the two times I did it I got infections (and all I did was toss in the hops?)

That's weird.
It can't be the hops themselves, they are anti bacterial by nature, unless you have them just lying around or something.

My only thought would be something either infected it before you dry hopped, or got into it when you opened the container to dry hop.

When I throw hops in for a dry hop I make sure to sanitize the lid itself before taking it off, and all around the lid area as well. And my hands, and the knife that cuts open the hop package, and the hop package itself before I open it.

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I use a french press. If you are going to use pellets in one put them in a hop bag you can clog the screen. 2 cups of water your priming sugar bring to boil add hops steep for an hour.

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"jivex5k" post=335663 said:

"kmccarthy27" post=335661 said:

"jivex5k" post=335626 said:

Hop tea will work well, you wont have to wait to dry hop it.

But I noticed you said it's been fermenting for 18 day, you could thow in a half oz of hops and leave them in for a week and then bottle.

I fear dry hopping, the two times I did it I got infections (and all I did was toss in the hops?)

That's weird.
It can't be the hops themselves, they are anti bacterial by nature, unless you have them just lying around or something.

My only thought would be something either infected it before you dry hopped, or got into it when you opened the container to dry hop.

When I throw hops in for a dry hop I make sure to sanitize the lid itself before taking it off, and all around the lid area as well. And my hands, and the knife that cuts open the hop package, and the hop package itself before I open it.

I think its more the taking the lid off, I have a very old house, and there is no telling if my basement is that safe to be able to do that. My plan is to do a test batch where I bring the LBK upstairs in my dining room to dry hop and see what happens.

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kmcarthy~

Based on what I read, all you are using is NUGGET.

According to the info on Nugget:
Nugget Pellet Hops (1 oz) [00503]
$1.99 $1.39

Click to View Images
USA
Nugget is a high alpha acid hop with a good aroma profile. Beer styles that typically use this hop include ales, stouts, and barleywines.

Possible Substitutions: Galena, Magnum, Columbus, and Target.


Technical Specifications:
Aroma: Herbal
Alpha Acids: Approx. 12.4%
Beta Acids: 4 - 6% w/w
Co-Humulone: 24 - 30% of alpha acids
Total Oil: 1.7 - 2.3 ml/100 grams
Storageability: 70 - 80% alpha acid remaing after 6 months storage at 20°C
Myrcene: 51 - 59% of whole oil
Humulene: 12 - 22% of whole oil
Caryophyllene: 7 - 10% of whole oil
Farnesene:

What I am reading says you should smell it before you taste it. Although the alpha is high...

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Bitterness in beer is measured in “International Bitterness Units” or IBU, with each style having a typical range of bitterness. This is a measurement of the concentration of bitter hop acids in the beer in parts-per-million. American Light Lager beers score around 10 IBU, while Imperial IPAs and their ilk can reach over 100. Some claim that there is a threshold between 70 and 100 IBU that above which you cannot taste any more bitterness, but we could find no definitive sources for these claims. There are many genetic factors that effect ones perception of bitterness however, and these can lead to large differences between how the same beer will taste for two different people.

There is one other aspect to IBUs that make them an imperfect measure of a beer’s taste. Bitterness is relative to the amount of malt in a beer. The more malt in a beer the sweeter the beer, and the sweeter the beer the more bittering acids are needed to balance that sweetness. This is why a Guinness Stout doesn’t taste as bitter as a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale even though they are both around 40IBU. The chart at the left shows several popular craft beers and their IBU ratings, and craft beers often include IBU information on their labels or websites.

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