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Cleveland013

Should You Drink Your IPAs and Wheats young?

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I've got 2 batches conditioning.

My Skywalker Whiny Wheat and my Scruffy Looking Nerf Herder IPA.

I've seen several posts saying IPAs and Wheats are best when drank young that they lose their hops aroma/flavor or taste the older they get.

BUT by young is that right after the 4 weeks carb/conditioning OR is it less than 4 weeks, like at 2 or 3 weeks in?

Any advice would be great guys! :) Thanks! :cheers:

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Hmmm............ IPA's originally stored for a year, hopped in the barrel and then sent on a sailboat ride around Africa to India. They arrived sparkling & well hopped. Some have reported a loss of hop flavor and aroma in a month. My experience has led me to doing a hop tea at bottling and/or kegging. Not using O2 absorbing bottle caps. When I keg the IPA tastes just as good at the end as it did in the beginning
[attachment=11262]Thumbsup.jpg[/attachment]

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I'd have to say yes on both beer types. Now as for when they are condition ready depends on the conditioning temp, ABV, adjuncts. I'd say that most that are below 6% ABV and no adjuncts are good to try at 4 weeks.

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"Cleveland013" post=337134 said:

I've got 2 batches conditioning.

My Skywalker Whiny Wheat and my Scruffy Looking Nerf Herder IPA.

I've seen several posts saying IPAs and Wheats are best when drank young that they lose their hops aroma/flavor or taste the older they get.

BUT by young is that right after the 4 weeks carb/conditioning OR is it less than 4 weeks, like at 2 or 3 weeks in?

Any advice would be great guys! :) Thanks! :cheers:

Depends.... My all grain recipes are typically ready to drink when they are fully carbed; 2 weeks after bottling. Only way to know for sure is to keep sampling.

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I have had Hefeweizens ready to drink about 10 days after bottling. That was after fermenting for 14 days.
The last batch of Hefe I made was brewed Oct 27 and bottled Nov 14. The wife opened one last week and told me it wasn't that good. I tried it and it wasn't as good as it was about 4-6 weeks ago.
So, from experience I say wheats are better enjoyed young!

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IMHO...definitely on the wheat beers. A guy at a small brewery in town told me to bottle the wheats as soon as their done fermenting, and start drinking them as soon as they are carbed. As for the IPA's, I usually take a test at 3 weeks after bottling...If it's good, I throw a couple in the fridge and start drinkin'

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"haerbob3" post=337139 said:

Hmmm............ IPA's originally stored for a year, hopped in the barrel and then sent on a sailboat ride around Africa to India. They arrived sparkling & well hopped. Some have reported a loss of hop flavor and aroma in a month. My experience has led me to doing a hop tea at bottling and/or kegging. Not using O2 absorbing bottle caps. When I keg the IPA tastes just as good at the end as it did in the beginning
[attachment=11262]Thumbsup.jpg[/attachment]

True on the initial IPA intention but the Britts never had the hoppiness of an American IPA.

I've been wandering this myself. My Gila Monster Black IPA reaches it's 4 weeks in a bottle tomorrow. It's an IPA but it's also a high alcohol (7.5%) beer. So how long should I let this stuff mature?

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me thinks you are going have to do same tasting to decide where the beer is at its best. My guess would be 6 weeks. This way all the flavors have a chance to meld

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"haerbob3" post=337192 said:

me thinks you are going have to do same tasting to decide where the beer is at its best. My guess would be 6 weeks. This way all the flavors have a chance to meld

Thanks haerbob. I've got enough craft beer on hand to last me till then.

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taste one at 4 weeks, 5 weeks and 6 weeks this way you know where your preference is. I like the drier beers so my recommendations maybe slanted that way. I keg 99% of my beer now and the volume in the keg and the O2 free environment helps

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"Cleveland013" post=337134 said:

I've got 2 batches conditioning.

My Skywalker Whiny Wheat and my Scruffy Looking Nerf Herder IPA.

I've seen several posts saying IPAs and Wheats are best when drank young that they lose their hops aroma/flavor or taste the older they get.

BUT by young is that right after the 4 weeks carb/conditioning OR is it less than 4 weeks, like at 2 or 3 weeks in?

Any advice would be great guys! :) Thanks! :cheers:


Yes, yes, yes and yes. I like 'em young, especially the wheat's and IPA's when they're 6% ABV or less. There's nothing like them made with all fresh ingredients and served on tap after a week of force carbonating. Of course an aggressive fermentation with very little lag time is key in producing a great tasting beer in as little as three weeks.

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I've been told that wheats are generally done conditioning at 2 - 2.5 weeks and are good to go right away at that point.

A few of the posts here imply that they ferment faster, too. Is that correct? I just bottled a wheat today, but let it ferment the usual three weeks. Should I have taken an OG sample and bottled earlier if it was ready?

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You are fine, it's no biggie.

But yeah, usually wheats are lower in gravity, and they also tend to have a bit more unfermentables in them, and wheat yeast was not taught to behave and make clean American beer. So yeah, they generally get done pretty quickly.

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"asnider" post=337832 said:

I've been told that wheats are generally done conditioning at 2 - 2.5 weeks and are good to go right away at that point.

A few of the posts here imply that they ferment faster, too. Is that correct? I just bottled a wheat today, but let it ferment the usual three weeks. Should I have taken an OG sample and bottled earlier if it was ready?


I brew my 420 Special Wheat with a healthy pitch of WLP-001 American Ale yeast to give it a nice clean finish that let's the other flavorings come through clearly. An American Wheat makes for a nice lighter tasting and more refreshing beer than those wheats fermented with more traditional wheat yeasts, which some folks say are too yeasty.

When brewing a beer that's about 6% ABV or less that was fermented with a healthy pitch of yeast your final gravity readings should be stable after 10-14 days and ready to bottle or keg. For many beginners getting a healthy pitch of yeast and an aggressive fermentation is easy to do by just taking a temperature reading then pitching and fermenting within 65-75F for two weeks. Or course owning and using a hydrometer is always the best way to check the progress of your fermenting beer and it's one of the easiest tools a brewer can use.

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"Screwy Brewer" post=337865 said:

"asnider" post=337832 said:

Or course owning and using a hydrometer is always the best way to check the progress of your fermenting beer and it's one of the easiest tools a brewer can use.

I always take OG and FG readings, but I have been letting all of my beers ferment for 3 weeks by default, based on the advice of so many good folks on these forums.

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