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jason29307

All grain with Mr. Beer

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Hello all, this is my first post.
I have been brewing for about 10 years now off and on. Mostly extract W/ grains, some all grain. I am sizing down to 2.5 gallons instead of 5 to experiment with different fruit, spices, honey, chilli's, etc...
I was wondering if any of you guys have any good all grain recipes using your Mr. Beer keg. This is my first Mr beer kit and brewed the light that came with the kit to get time and temps down. I am looking forward to doing experimental 2.5 gallon batches and if they turn out really good, do a 5 gallon batch.
Also, I am wanting to lager some as well. Have you guys ever put your Mr. beer keg in a fridge to lager for a few weeks then take out, bottle, carb, and back in the fridge for conditioning?
Please chime in with your recipes and tips.

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most guys do a 5 gallon and split between 2 LBK. You have been brewing awhile the same rules apply. You are not going to want sit on the cake that long with the lagering. The LBK is not good for secondary as its air lock is positive. The CO2 form the fermentation forms a bit of a seal. Once primary is over you lose the pressure and outside air seeps in


[attachment=11583]Welcome09_2013-02-24.gif[/attachment]

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You can easily scale any recipe down to 2.4 gallon. I either do AG like that or in 3 gallon better bottles almost exclusively. Just cut any recipe down by a factor of .48 (or .5 if you don't care to be that precise). I also do lagers all of the time... Two weeks in the lager fridge, 4 days or so out of the fridge for a d-rest, and a couple more weeks in the fridge, then bottle.

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Welcome aboard! What Swen posted: just use a five gallon recipe and use .48X ingredients for success!
Here's one of my favorite recipes:


[attachment=11584]image_2013-02-25-2.jpg[/attachment]

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"swenocha" post=342133 said:

You can easily scale any recipe down to 2.4 gallon. I either do AG like that or in 3 gallon better bottles almost exclusively. Just cut any recipe down by a factor of .48 (or .5 if you don't care to be that precise). I also do lagers all of the time... Two weeks in the lager fridge, 4 days or so out of the fridge for a d-rest, and a couple more weeks in the fridge, then bottle.

+1 to what Swen says. I exclusively do 2.4 gallon batches and use 5 gallons recipes and cut them by .5, mainly because I am lazy and it's easy. I have done one lager and used the same method as Swen and it came out great. I have 2 lbks and one slimline and everything works great for me. :cheers:

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"Rebel_B" post=342142 said:

Welcome aboard! What Swen posted: just use a five gallon recipe and use .48X ingredients for success!
Here's one of my favorite recipes:


[attachment=11584]image_2013-02-25-2.jpg[/attachment]


FYI that recipe sheet is hard to see. I can't make out the fine details.

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I brewed this almost 2 years ago, and fermented it in my LBK.

http://community.mrbeer.com/forum/20-advanced-recipes/157263-snpa-clone-biab#157263

Recipe Sierra Nevada Pale Ale Clone
Style American Pale Ale
Brewer packerduf
Batch 2.40 gal
All Grain

Recipe Gravity 1.055 OG
Estimated FG 1.014 FG
Recipe Bitterness 39 IBU
Recipe Color 8° SRM
Alcohol by Volume 5.3%
Alcohol by Weight 4.2%

5.20 lb American two-row Grain Mashed
0.31 lb Crystal 60L Grain Mashed

0.10 oz Magnum Pellet 60 minutes
0.38 oz Perle Pellet 60 minutes
0.50 oz Cascade Pellet 15 minutes
0.50 oz Cascade Pellet 0 minutes

0.50 unit Irish Moss Fining
0.50 unit Yeast Nutrient

1.00 unit White Labs WLP001 - California Ale Yeast™


[attachment=11618]SierraNevadaPaleAleClonelacing.JPG[/attachment]

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"dbark" post=343001 said:

"Rebel_B" post=342142 said:

Welcome aboard! What Swen posted: just use a five gallon recipe and use .48X ingredients for success!
Here's one of my favorite recipes:


[attachment=11584]image_2013-02-25-2.jpg[/attachment]


FYI that recipe sheet is hard to see. I can't make out the fine details.

Yeah, it's a .jpg from my phone, from BYO magazine January-February 2013... Updated from the previously published clone recipe.

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale clone (5 gallons/19 L, all-grain)

OG = 1.052 FG = 1.011 IBU = 38 SRM = 10 ABV = 5.4%

Ingredients

10 lb. 2 oz. (4.6 kg) 2-row pale malt 11 oz. (0.30 kg) caramel malt (60 °L)

4. 4 AAU Perle hops (90 mins)

(0. 5 oz./14 g of 8.8% alpha acids)

6. 0 AAU Cascade hops (45 mins)

(1. 0 oz./28 g of 6% alpha acids)

1. 5 oz. (43 g) Cascade hops (0 mins) Wyeast 1056 (American Ale), White Labs WLP001 (California Ale) or Fermentis US-05 yeast (1 qt./1 L yeast starter) 1 cup corn sugar (for priming)

Step by Step

Two or three days before brew day, make the yeast starter, aerating the wort thoroughly (preferably with oxygen) before pitching the yeast.

On brew day, mash in at 155 °F (68 °C) in 14 qts. (13 L) of water. Hold at this temperature for 60 minutes. Raise mash temperature to 170 °F (77 °C), hold for 5 minutes then recirculate. Run off wort and sparge with water hot enough to keep the grain bed around 170 °F (77 °C). Collect 6.5 gallons (25 L) of wort. (Check that final runnings do not drop below SG 1.010.) Boil wort for 90 minutes, adding hops at times indicated. Ferment at 68 °F (20 °C).

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale clone (5 gallons/19 L, partial mash)

OG = 1.052 FG = 1.011 IBU = 38 SRM = 10 ABV = 5.4%

Ingredients

3 lb. 5 oz. (1.5 kg) 2-row pale malt

1. 25 lbs (0.57 kg) light dried malt extract

3. 3 lbs. (1.5 kg) light liquid malt extract 11 oz. (0.30 kg) caramel malt (60 °L)

4. 4 AAU Perle hops (90 mins)

(0. 5 oz./14 g of 8.8% alpha acids)

6. 0 AAU Cascade hops (45 mins)

(1. 0 oz./28 g of 6% alpha acids)

1. 5 oz. (43 g) Cascade hops (0 mins) Wyeast 1056 (American Ale), White Labs WLP001 (California Ale) or Fermentis US-05 yeast

(1 qt./1 L yeast starter) 1 cup corn sugar (for priming)

Step by Step

Mash grains at 155 °F (68 °C) in 5.5 qts. (5. 2 L) of water. Hold at this temperature for 45 minutes. Collect 2.25 gallons (8. 5 L) of wort. Add water to make at least 3 gallons (11 L) of wort. Stir in dried malt extract and boil wort for 90 minutes, adding hops at times indicated. Add liquid malt extract in the final 15 minutes of the boil. Chill wort, transfer to fermenter and top up to 5 gallons (19 L). Aerate wort and pitch yeast. Ferment at 68 °F (20 °C).

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale clone (5 gallons/19 L, extract with grains)

OG = 1.052 FG = 1.011 IBU = 38 SRM = 10 ABV = 5.4%

Ingredients

1 lb. 5 oz. (0.60 kg) 2-row pale malt

1. 75 lbs (0.80 kg) light dried malt extract

4. 0 lbs. (0.79 kg) light liquid malt extract 11 oz. (1.8 kg) caramel malt (60 °L)

4. 4 AAU Perle hops (90 mins)

(0. 5 oz./14 g of 8.8% alpha acids)

6. 0 AAU Cascade hops (45 mins)

(1. 0 oz./28 g of 6% alpha acids)

1. 5 oz. (43 g) Cascade hops (0 mins) Wyeast 1056 (American Ale), White Labs WLP001 (California Ale) or Fermentis US-05 yeast (1 qt./1 L yeast starter) 1 cup corn sugar (for priming)

Step by Step

Place crushed grains in a steeping bag. Steep grains at 155 °F (68 °C) in 3.0 qts. (2. 9 L) of water. Remove bag and place in a colander over the brewpot. Rinse grains with 2 qts. (2 L) of 170 °F (77 °C) water. Add water to brewpot to make at least 3.0 gallons (11 L) of wort. Stir in dried malt extract and boil wort for 90 minutes, adding hops at times indicated. Keep some boiling water handy and do not let boil volume dip below 3 gallons (11 L). Add liquid malt extract in the final 15 minutes of the boil. Chill wort and transfer to fermenter. Top fermenter up to 5 gallons (19 L). Aerate wort and pitch yeast. Ferment at 68 °F (20 °C).

Tips for Success

For all of the five clone beer recipes, be sure to pitch an adequate amount of yeast. The yeast starter sizes on these pages should allow you to yield the correct amount of yeast cells for a healthy fermentation. Aerate the starter well, preferably with oxygen, before pitching your yeast to the starter wort. If you aerate by shaking the starter, multiply the size of each starter by 1.33.

For the dry hopped recipes, use whole hops if you can find them for dry hopping, and perhaps for the late kettle additions. Use only the freshest hops.

For the hoppy recipes, a little sulfate in your water will accentuate the hop character of the beer. You can add sulfate ions by adding calcium sulfate (gypsum) to your brewing water. All-grain brewers starting with RO or distilled water should add 2–4 tsp. Per 10 gallons (38 L) of brewing water. Extract brewers can add 1 tsp. Of gypsum to the boil.

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