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CC Shmucko

Too much carbonation

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My first batch was in the Keg for a few days before I realized it was about 62 degrees. I moved it to a good temp, and let it sit another 2 weeks. I then let it sit for 2 weeks at recommended temps and then moved it to a cooler room (probably low 60's). Then, after two more weeks I tried it and it was a bit cidery and very heady. I then put it back at the recommended temp and let it condition another week, and it now tastes great, but is still over-carbonated. Could the numerous temperature changes affect the carbonation?

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The amount of sugar, as stated above is the main culprit in over carbonation! You made great beer but the Mr Beer sugar specs are off some!
Just add a little less next time if you are bottle priming or make the adjustment in the calculator if you are batch priming!
BTW, welcome to the BORG! :borg:

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Welcome aboard The Obsession CC Shmucko! If you're like the rest of us here you'll soon be awash in a sea of beer and setting sail on many great brewing adventures. There's lot's of information here and plenty of hands to help you get under way. You'll soon be producing some memorable beers and having a lot of fun too in the days ahead.

Navigate on over to our Advanced Brewing Techniques area of the forum and read over the

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417" target="_blank" title="http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417">'4 Things Every Brewer Should Know About Yeast'

sticky. Yeast is a living cell, keep them healthy and they'll ferment you up some awesome tasting beers.

Set your course and sail on over to our New Brewers and FAQs area of the forum and read over the 'Malt To Adjunct Ratios' sticky.

Remember for the best tasting beer you'll want no less than 80% of the alcohol to come from malts and no more than 20% of the alcohol to come from sugars or other adjuncts.

Give your beer at least 2-3 weeks to ferment and another 3-4 weeks to carbonate and condition before refrigerating. I know it's going to be hard to resist popping them open sooner, but like with anything homebrewing it'll be worth the wait.

When using any priming calculator enter the warmest temperature that your fermenting beer has endured between the time you pitched your yeast until bottling day. This has to do with the beer's residual level of Co2, or the ability for beer to absorb Co2 into solution during fermentation. For a typical Ale fermenting around 70F the residual Co2 will be around .83 volumes, which is then subtracted from whatever Co2 level you entered as your target.

Example 1: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 70F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 2: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 60F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 3: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 80F - Enter 80F for the temperature

Higher levels of Co2 will stay in solution when the beer is colder, as the beer warms up more Co2 will be released from solution. Hope that helps.

This is my glass of beer. There are many like it, but this one is mine. Without me my beer is useless. Without my beer, I am useless. ~ Screwy Brewer

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"CC Shmucko" post=344152 said:

My first batch was in the Keg for a few days before I realized it was about 62 degrees. I moved it to a good temp, and let it sit another 2 weeks. I then let it sit for 2 weeks at recommended temps and then moved it to a cooler room (probably low 60's). Then, after two more weeks I tried it and it was a bit cidery and very heady. I then put it back at the recommended temp and let it condition another week, and it now tastes great, but is still over-carbonated. Could the numerous temperature changes affect the carbonation?

As mentioned, over-carbonation is likely a result of too much priming sugar. If, however, the beer is foaming out of the bottle, it might just be too young, but I don't think that that is what you are saying. I'm having a hard time following everything you listed. You said you realized it was 62, and then moved "to a good temp." I must point out that 62 is an excellent temp. Cooler is better (too cold inhibits the yeast, but there ain't nothin' wrong with low 60's), Higher temps in the 70's can produce off-flavors. Though I don't really see when bottling occurs, I'm implying that you did two weeks in the LBK, two weeks at a warmer temp in bottles, then two weeks in the low 60's, then another week at room temp. If so, all of that is OK. I don't think temp changes are an issue for you.

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"CC Shmucko" post=344152 said:

My first batch was in the Keg for a few days before I realized it was about 62 degrees. I moved it to a good temp, and let it sit another 2 weeks. I then let it sit for 2 weeks at recommended temps and then moved it to a cooler room (probably low 60's). Then, after two more weeks I tried it and it was a bit cidery and very heady. I then put it back at the recommended temp and let it condition another week, and it now tastes great, but is still over-carbonated. Could the numerous temperature changes affect the carbonation?

If the 62*F you started out with was the ambient air temp, run with that for the first 5-7 days next batch before moving it to a warmer place. With the heat being generated by the fermentation, that's where you want to be during that initial phase.

+1 on the amount of sugar recommended by the MB instructions resulting in fizzy beer.

Give it 4 weeks(at 70-72*F) after you bottle before you try one. Also, 2-3 days in the fridge after the 4 weeks will give a better result.

Finally, if you want to be able to fine-tune the level of carbonation and make it consistent for each bottle, there's only one way to do that well-------batch priming.

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