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Screwy Brewer

What A Healthy Fermentation Actually Looks Like

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When you've pitched enough healthy yeast in about 12-16 hours you should begin to see activity in the LBK and the activity should keep increasing in intensity until the end of the primary fermentation.

At this point the yeast have consumed all the sugars in the wort and now start converting bad tasting precursors into good flavors.

They do this to build up their energy reserves before dropping out of suspension and going dormant. After two or three weeks you'll end up with some great tasting beer

[video type=youtube]MZhvWvewvM4
Aggressive Primary Fermentation With Little Lagtime

There's a whole lot more detail about what makes for a healthy fermentation like temperatures, yeast pitching rates and viability but in the simplest terms healthy yeast ferment better tasting beer.

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417" target="_blank" title="http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?
option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417">'4 Things Every Brewer Should Know About Yeast'

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"Screwy Brewer" post=347458
[video type=youtube said:

MZhvWvewvM4
Aggressive Primary Fermentation With Little Lagtime


If you were take the lid off that LBK this is what you'd hear:

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That is what my current batch did for 4 days..Did a raspberry wheat..using s23 @ 56-59 degrees..smells killer, lots of yeast farts.

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How long does it take to start being as active as the one in the video? I've brewed lots of batches and never actually caught it getting crazy like that. I usually see it once the krausen has formed but it never looks as active as that stuff.

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What you actually see and when is yeast specific as well as pitching rate specific. A lower flocculating yeast looks very different then one that flocculates and clumps up when you perve it at certain times. WLP005 is very flocculent, and it's a quick/aggressive fermenter when you pitch it at the right rates, which Screwy does for sure. So you get those really cool yeast balls flying around in there. If you were perving a low floc yeast at the same point in time, it's not going to look the same, it may be just as active, but a lot less easy to "see" because there won't be the big yeast clumps flying around - if you commando'd some hops, you might see hop bits flying around. Chico strains that some folks almost exclusively use depending on what they make sit somewhere in the middle of the spectrum in this regards, it's not a highly flocculent yeast like WLP005.

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So, from what you guys are saying, I would guess the gold packet of Mr. Beer yeast is not that flocculant. When I watch it, it makes a good krausen and I have to look very closely to see any little clumps moving. Is there a relation between flocculation and attentuation?

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"BrewThrough" post=347649 said:

So, from what you guys are saying, I would guess the gold packet of Mr. Beer yeast is not that flocculant. When I watch it, it makes a good krausen and I have to look very closely to see any little clumps moving. Is there a relation between flocculation and attentuation?


Good question, yes.

A highly flocculant yeast, one that settles to the bottom earlier, typically has less attenuation and ferments to a relatively higher final gravity.

A less flocculant yeast, one that tends to stay off the bottom longer, typically has greater attenuation and ferments to a relatively lower final gravity.

When decanting starter wort it's advisable to allow all the yeast to settle to the bottom first, so the less flocculant higher attenuating cells don't get discarded.

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