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T3kiz

Bottle Priming with Turbinado and White Cane Sugar

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Finished making my Chocolate Porter this afternoon and its now in the LBK as I await impatiently for it to ferment. I was thinking about bottle priming with both turbinado sugar and white cane sugar just to see the difference, if any, in the two. I'm on Screwy's site looking at the bottle priming calculator but I'm unsure as to what the "Desired CO2 Volumes" should be, default being 2.5. Anyone have an insight into what my "CO2 Volume" should be set at and if the use of turbinado sugar will have any effect on the priming?

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if you are expecting different flavors or carb levels you are going to be disappointed the amount of priming agent is to small to have any effect other than to produce CO2

Words of advice there HAT??

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Difference is negligible given the small amounts that are used.

There are many many many thread in this very forum on the subject.

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Ive read before that the use of different types of sugars wont affect flavor given the amount used, I was unsure if there would be any difference in the measurements by using the turbinado sugar. And wanted to compare the 2 myself just so i could say that I have compared the two and any (if they happen) discernible differences. After going to Screwy's calculator, seeing the CO2 volume, and having no idea what that meant, I thought I would ask. I did a thread search for turbinado, but nothing that was able to answer my questions regarding it.

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"haerbob3" post=348417 said:

if you are expecting different flavors or carb levels you are going to be disappointed the amount of priming agent is to small to have any effect other than to produce CO2

Words of advice there HAT??

You and Wings got it covered. I'll just point out that I did the math, and the amount of priming sugar per 12 ounces of beer is something ridiculously low, like 0.0625 ounces. It can't possibly affect the taste.

It might affect carb levels, but probably not to any significant degree. In using Screwy's carb calc, I've become aware of different measurements per sugar type, but again, it's not as if one would be 2 ounces and another 7 ounces.

NDR, in using the calculator, set the volume level for what you've got in the LBK (I think the default on the site is 5 gallons, so check first to make sure). Then set the temperature level for whatever temperature the LBK is at. It does make a difference. Then look at the carb range for the style of beer you've got in the chart underneath the calculator. I usually pick a number midway through the range, plug it into the calculator, choose the measurement for the sugar and the type of sugar, and set it in motion.

It's pretty easy. Off the top of my head, I'd say for an LBK batch of porter, you'd need about 1.5 ounces of cane sugar for the entire batch. If you're bottle priming, set the volume for whatever size bottle you need maybe 1/2 teaspoon per bottle.

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The differance between cane (white) and turbinado (rawish) is that turbinado has been processed less, containing more of the mollasses that white had removed. Go ahead with the experiment, as it is a learning hobby here.
IMHO, the Chocolate Porter will hide whatever flavor difference there is between the two, and it is very little. There will be no difference in carbination. Now, if you are a scientist and have all the proper equipment, whatever that may be, I'm sure you could prove the miniscual (sp) difference in carb and flavor. The difference is only on paper though.

As FD stated, you should be able to find the carb chart for beer styles on SB website.

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"mtsoxfan" post=348483 said:

The differance between cane (white) and turbinado (rawish) is that turbinado has been processed less, containing more of the mollasses that white had removed.

If that's the case, you gain nothing by using it vs. cane or corn sugar. Molasses flavor, after the sugar is eaten away, is nasty.

Look at priming sugar simply as food for the yeast so they can produce the CO2 to carbonate your beer - nothing more.

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Re: the molasses left behind, at 0.0625 ounces of sugar per 12 ounces of beer, you're

A - not going to notice it, and

B - taking time and money for no good reason, since the result isn't going to be discernible to your tongue.

Stick with cane sugar, or, if you really feel pressured to use a "real brewing ingredient", corn sugar.

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