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stevenf

Will it work at 60 Degrees

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So I've managed to come up with two extra Mr B kits and I'm wondering if I set them up in my basement what will happen. Only problem is it stays exactly 60 degrees. Will my beer ferment at that temperature properly?

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not with the supplied yeast it is an ale yeast. At that temp you will need a lager yeast

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I have to disagree with haerbob. I ferment in my basement, and it stays around 60 degrees in the winter. It's been my experience that the Mr. Beer yeast works just fine at that temp.

I would recommend that you let the batches ferment for a full three weeks before bottling.

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+1 to FedoraDave's answer it will ferment just take it a little longer. go the whole 3 weeks in the LBK.

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Guest

All I'm gonna say is... says I, if u r gonna try to ferment at that temp, make sure u have a hydrometer to check the fermentation. That is on the very low side.

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Along those fermenting temp lines: does it ferment cleaner at the lower temps? Does it take longer as in 3-4 weeks?
[attachment=12091]Inquiringminds.jpg[/attachment]

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"JohnDubya" post=350121 said:

All I'm gonna say is... says I, if u r gonna try to ferment at that temp, make sure u have a hydrometer to check the fermentation. That is on the very low side.


agreed it could take 4 weeks, but it will ferment.

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Ive fermented many a brew this winter with an air temp of 60F. With the activity the keg will read 62-63ish. A very nice beer this will produce.

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I've been using 2 packs of DownUnda at those temps.

It works, but even with 2 packs the beer stays green longer then it would if I had used a pack of S-05 or Nottingham at those temps. Every beer I've made with it at those temps has been like this (both with one or two packs), where every beer I've made with the same refills with another ale yeast that likes the lower temps has cleaned up the acetaldehyde much quicker.

So, yes, I will agree that the DownUnda works at those temps, but it's not as happy as a clam, so just be willing to give it longer conditioning time.

Not a problem for me as my pipeline is big. But if your in a hurry, you may want to use a different yeast.

(then again everyone's acetaldehyde taste threshold is a bit different, so you might not find it tasting green as long as I do).

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"mashani" post=350221 said:

I've been using 2 packs of DownUnda at those temps.

Thumbs up to 2 packs of FromDownUnda! I have used this yeast from 62-68 without any issues whatsoever. I recommend hydrating the yeast prior to pitching, but I have had nothing but good starts with FromDownUnda.

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I brew in my basement and my temp ranges from 60-64 degrees. what i do is lay/somewhat wrap the LBK with 2-3 t-shirts. ALso, i have a hydrometer and dont use it. Unfortunately im not sure what im doing with it or know how to read the numbers and do the calculations.

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"DetroitBrew" post=357259 said:

I brew in my basement and my temp ranges from 60-64 degrees. what i do is lay/somewhat wrap the LBK with 2-3 t-shirts. ALso, i have a hydrometer and dont use it. Unfortunately im not sure what im doing with it or know how to read the numbers and do the calculations.

here's a video showing how to read a hydrometer

there are plenty of online calculators to help you use the numbers like Screwy Brewer's here

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I ferment between 60-65..all my beers have come out very drinkable..I dont always use the fromunda yeast. I have been experimenting with s23, danstar nottingham, and us05. I go the full 3 weeks and use a hydrometer. Some have taken longer to condition. Just my 2 cents.

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Like I stated before I prefer to ferment at the low end of the temp range. I never had good results using the fromunda yeast. The reason I suggested a lager yeast it will ferment clean at 60 where as an ale yeast may get stressed. As long as you get the results you want you are golden.

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"mashani" post=350221 said:

I've been using 2 packs of DownUnda at those temps.

It works, but even with 2 packs the beer stays green longer then it would if I had used a pack of S-05 or Nottingham at those temps. Every beer I've made with it at those temps has been like this (both with one or two packs), where every beer I've made with the same refills with another ale yeast that likes the lower temps has cleaned up the acetaldehyde much quicker.

So, yes, I will agree that the DownUnda works at those temps, but it's not as happy as a clam, so just be willing to give it longer conditioning time.

Not a problem for me as my pipeline is big. But if your in a hurry, you may want to use a different yeast.

(then again everyone's acetaldehyde taste threshold is a bit different, so you might not find it tasting green as long as I do).

+1. I have noticed longer conditioning times fermenting that low. I would recommend US05 or WY1007. They are colder fermenting. It will work though it just takes longer IMHO.

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"haerbob3" post=357323 said:

Like I stated before I prefer to ferment at the low end of the temp range. I never had good results using the fromunda yeast. The reason I suggested a lager yeast it will ferment clean at 60 where as an ale yeast may get stressed. As long as you get the results you want you are golden.

It's really all depends on the yeast. I don't know what yeast MRB uses for their fromunda, but it has a pretty high temp range as per the website (68-78). I don't think I would ever ferment that high unless I was trying to get something funky out of a belgian yeast or something.

WLP001/WY1056/US-05 is generally good down to 60. It's actually going to ferment as clean as possible for an ale yeast at those temps, if it does take a little longer.

For me, 60 is kind of high for a lager yeast. You're getting into hybrid/steam beer territory using lager yeasts at those kinds of temperature and inviting esters to the party at that point.

60 is the sweet spot for hybrid beers, and select yeast strains that thrive at that temp would be a good idea for this poster. Kolschs, Alts, and the aforementioned Steam/Common beer and their respective yeasts would be a good choice. I'm a fan of WY1007 -German Ale, used that recently for a great Dusseldorf Alt.

For Pure Ale yeasts, WY1728 - Scottish Ale yeast performs really well and ferments really clean around 60.

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I've started that low with the a single pack of Mr. Beer yeast (rehydrated) and it did fine. I did, however, bring it up to 64*F for a while and let it finish a couple days at 67*F before bottling.

Best option - spend a few bucks and get a packet of Nottingham. It's an ale yeast, but it does very well in the low 60's and ferments well all the way down to 55*F. Just be sure to keep Nottingham below 68*F.

Second best - pitch two packs of rehydrated Mr. Beer yeast.

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Thanks for sharing experience. I also have a cold basement. Currently brewing in the kitchen, but I'm one accident away from banishment below!

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