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dbrowning

How can I make a beer a little darker

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Any steeping grain that affects the colour will also likely affect the taste, at least slightly.

Can I ask why you would want to change the colour of a beer for no reason? If your addition is not going to affect the final outcome, you might as well just use food coloring to get the desired visual effect.

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"manosteel9423" post=354635 said:

Any steeping grain that affects the colour will also likely affect the taste, at least slightly.

Can I ask why you would want to change the colour of a beer for no reason? If your addition is not going to affect the final outcome, you might as well just use food coloring to get the desired visual effect.

+1. I thought the same exact thing when I read the question. If you only want color with no effect on taste, I'd try one drop each of yellow, red and blue food coloring. Repeat until desired color is acheived.

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"manosteel9423" post=354635 said:

Any steeping grain that affects the colour will also likely affect the taste, at least slightly.

Can I ask why you would want to change the colour of a beer for no reason? If your addition is not going to affect the final outcome, you might as well just use food coloring to get the desired visual effect.

+1. Any addition of malts or grains is going to change the flavor. Steeping grains will affect it less than adding Dark LME or DME, but will still have an effect.

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"Jim Johnson" post=354633 said:

steep some dark grain. amount will depend on which grain you choose


+1 to this...you could use a very little amount of chocolate malt to get the color. Since your only using a little bit, it won't impart much (if any) flavor, just the color.

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I have to ask, why do you only want to change only the color? Is it really that important that its darker and not change the taste? Just trying to understand the reasoning.

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"Nightman" post=354641 said:

I have to ask, why do you only want to change only the color? Is it really that important that its darker and not change the taste? Just trying to understand the reasoning.

Pretty simple .... its what i WANT

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"dbrowning" post=354643 said:

"Nightman" post=354641 said:

I have to ask, why do you only want to change only the color? Is it really that important that its darker and not change the taste? Just trying to understand the reasoning.

Pretty simple .... its what i WANT


Works for me. :lol:

You might get away with steeping a small amount of a dark DME without changing the taste.

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I would steep some grain over using food coloring. But then I don't like unnatural things in my beer. You will never taste 2 oz of black roasted barley and it won't affect ABV. How much darker do you want your beer?

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with out knowing what your brewing/doing this is pretty hard. are using an hme only? or are you making a craft that comes with an lme/dme? an off reservation recipie? or are we talking about a finished beer? kinda like the green beers at St. Pat's Day? i find the idea interesting, but need more informatioin. hell if we figure out how to darken your beer, maybe i'll finally figure out why mine are always darker than they should be. :)

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"Gymrat" post=354646 said:

I would steep some grain over using food coloring. But then I don't like unnatural things in my beer. You will never taste 2 oz of black roasted barley and it won't affect ABV. How much darker do you want your beer?

+1

My food coloring comment was somewhat tongue in cheek...unless you are trying to make your beer green on St. Paddy's Day (and even then you should be drinking an Irish stout or red ale instead of some green-tinted light beer!), there is no place for food coloring in beer!

If your desire is strictly color, then steeping a very small amount of black malt will achieve that without imparting much flavor.

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Also if you are only wanting a slight color change you can boil unhopped malt extract for an extended period of time.

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"Gymrat" post=354652 said:

Also if you are only wanting a slight color change you can boil unhopped malt extract for an extended period of time.

define extended peroid.

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"Jim Johnson" post=354655 said:

"Gymrat" post=354652 said:

Also if you are only wanting a slight color change you can boil unhopped malt extract for an extended period of time.

define extended peroid.

It has been over a year since I brewed with extracts. But if memory serves me correctly a full hour is enough to cause extract to get darker. This is why the instructions usually have you add only half the extract at the beginning of your boil for hop utilization and the rest at the end to keep it from getting too dark.

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"Gymrat" post=354656 said:

"Jim Johnson" post=354655 said:

"Gymrat" post=354652 said:

Also if you are only wanting a slight color change you can boil unhopped malt extract for an extended period of time.

define extended peroid.

It has been over a year since I brewed with extracts. But if memory serves me correctly a full hour is enough to cause extract to get darker. This is why the instructions usually have you add only half the extract at the beginning of your boil for hop utilization and the rest at the end to keep it from getting too dark.

that's it! that's why mine always come out darker than they should. i've only made 3 MrB beers never hopped one up. jumped straight into an partial mash, kinda had to make my own instructions. thanks Gymrat. see dbrowning? told you i might. come on bro more info lets get yours figured out.

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Wear sunglasses... :laugh:

Only part tongue in cheek. I'm looking for taste. Whether mine is the proper color for that type of beer or not - I don't care. But, to each their own.

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Surprised no one has mentioned Maltoferm or Sinamar, as these are the products that are designed for this exact purpose... Though both likely have the potential of changing the flavor a smidge, they are developed to remove the bitter components, and they are so concentrated you are likely only adding very little to a Mr. B sized batch, so it's likely not noticeable.

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Since I keep some on hand for the same reason I'd go with Carafa Malt or a bit of Chocolate Malt to darken my beer a little without adding astringency or much aroma.

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OK Im making a blackbeerry wheat
Wheat DME
Steeping American Wheat and Carapils
Gonna add 1/4 - 1/2 black malt
that will get the color I want

Im not likely to even drink this myself and normally wouldnt care about color
But his one needs to be dark

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"dbrowning" post=354762 said:

OK Im making a blackbeerry wheat
Wheat DME
Steeping American Wheat and Carapils
Gonna add 1/4 - 1/2 black malt
that will get the color I want

Im not likely to even drink this myself and normally wouldnt care about color
But his one needs to be dark


1/4-1/2 what? Teaspoons? Tons? ;) 1 ounce in a 2 gallon batch will darken it by about 8 SRM.

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"dbrowning" post=354762 said:

OK Im making a blackbeerry wheat
Wheat DME
Steeping American Wheat and Carapils
Gonna add 1/4 - 1/2 black malt
that will get the color I want

Im not likely to even drink this myself and normally wouldnt care about color
But his one needs to be dark


I'd go with 1/8 ounce of Carafa II steeped for 30 minutes at 155F in a gallon of water.

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"russki" post=354768 said:

"dbrowning" post=354762 said:

OK Im making a blackbeerry wheat
Wheat DME
Steeping American Wheat and Carapils
Gonna add 1/4 - 1/2 black malt
that will get the color I want

Im not likely to even drink this myself and normally wouldnt care about color
But his one needs to be dark


1/4-1/2 what? Teaspoons? Tons? ;) 1 ounce in a 2 gallon batch will darken it by about 8 SRM.

A 1/2 # in 2.5 gal will darken it 31 SRM

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I echo was Screwy said. Carafa. I, II, or III. They get progressively darker and don't have the astringency that a lot of othe other Black Malts do.

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"Christ872" post=354793 said:

I echo was Screwy said. Carafa. I, II, or III. They get progressively darker and don't have the astringency that a lot of othe other Black Malts do.


Carafa II OR Black malt makes it almost black
Thats what I want
Dont think I can get Caraf III Local

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"PatBattle" post=354801 said:

I;ve use Synamar with no issues for a black ipa.

WHAT in cat hair is that?

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"PatBattle" post=354801 said:

I;ve use Synamar with no issues for a black ipa.


I only brew all grain but I call my Victory Yakima Glory replication a Cascadian Dark Ale with respect to my west coast brethren, or a Black India Ale for my east coast brewers.

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There's a link by swenocha related to Sinamar on page one of this thread.

"swenocha" post=354707 said:

Surprised no one has mentioned Maltoferm or Sinamar, as these are the products that are designed for this exact purpose... Though both likely have the potential of changing the flavor a smidge, they are developed to remove the bitter components, and they are so concentrated you are likely only adding very little to a Mr. B sized batch, so it's likely not noticeable.

And, Screwy, before you jump to conclusions... it is all natural and meets Reinheitsgebot. And it's been produced since 1902.

From Weyermann's website (link):

SINAMAR® is produced solely from our roasted malt CARAFA®, according to the strict German "Reinheitsgebot" (purity-law).

According to the links listed before by swenocha, this and maltoferm are used by most commercial breweries. Shiner uses maltoferm. Many others use Sinimar for their black IPAs, bocks, stouts, porters, scottish, dunkels, etc. You simply add an ounce or more to your brew at flame-out.

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"Screwy Brewer" post=354755 said:

Since I keep some on hand for the same reason I'd go with Carafa Malt or a bit of Chocolate Malt to darken my beer a little without adding astringency or much aroma.

Good to know, thanks.

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This turned out to be a very good thread. I didn't know that some grains could provide color without a noticeable change in flavor. And I sure didn't know about Maltoferm and Sinamar for coloring alone. Good info.

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PatBattle covered it pretty well, but to add... the maltoferm is essentially a really dark de-bittered DME, while the Sinamar is a small vial of liquid that I suppose is essentially a form of Carafa LME. As they mention in the link, a great many commercial breweries uses some of these to adjust the colors in a natural fashion.

(It was good to see you at the ENBF, PatBattle...)

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