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Wilson29

Straining before bottling?

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Before I start, yes I have used the search function on this topic. There is a lot of different info on the subject. I am trying to get a more clear beer in the bottles. My last batch I dry hopped and has tons of particles in my final product. This time I used a muslin sack, inside of a hop sack. I am wondering, should I buy a second LBK and transfer the beer through a paint strainer to get a clearer final product. Any suggestions are appreciated.

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Nope.

Straining right before bottling will introduce oxygen and that could make the beer taste like wet cardboard when it's sampled.

Strain when putting into the LBK before fermenting if you're going to strain.

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+1, ya don't want to oxyginate da nectar.

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Using a second lbk is a good idea to help reduce sediment and a good time to try batch priming. Its more equipment to clean but IMO easier to do. Cold crashing would also help.


No Straining after fermenting make good beer taste bad. :sick:

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So...if straining before bottling is out of the question, how is clear beer achieved? There is always sediment floating at the top of my LBK. It usually ends up in the last couple of bottles, and I hate wasting that much beer.

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"Nightman" post=358523 said:

Using a second lbk is a good idea to help reduce sediment and a good time to try batch priming. Its more equipment to clean but IMO easier to do. Cold crashing would also help.


No Straining after fermenting make good beer taste bad. :sick:

Now I'm confused. If I'm going to transfer to a second LBK, why can't I run it through a strainer? Is it the strainer that's adds oxygen? My ultimate goal is to keep all the stuff floating on top out of my bottles.

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"Wilson29" post=358533 said:

"Nightman" post=358523 said:

Using a second lbk is a good idea to help reduce sediment and a good time to try batch priming. Its more equipment to clean but IMO easier to do. Cold crashing would also help.


No Straining after fermenting make good beer taste bad. :sick:

Now I'm confused. If I'm going to transfer to a second LBK, why can't I run it through a strainer? Is it the strainer that's adds oxygen? My ultimate goal is to keep all the stuff floating on top out of my bottles.

if the strainer was inside then it would not add oxygen. going to a bottling bucket gives you 2 chanches to avoid trub once coming out of the primary most trub remains behind. what little is left is spread out over many bottles. if you cold crash it will help even more.

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"Wilson29" post=358533 said:

"Nightman" post=358523 said:

Using a second lbk is a good idea to help reduce sediment and a good time to try batch priming. Its more equipment to clean but IMO easier to do. Cold crashing would also help.


No Straining after fermenting make good beer taste bad. :sick:

Now I'm confused. If I'm going to transfer to a second LBK, why can't I run it through a strainer? Is it the strainer that's adds oxygen? My ultimate goal is to keep all the stuff floating on top out of my bottles.


Its how it runs through the strainer. Even when racking to a secondary or bottling bucket you want to be careful to not splash the beer. Its best to start it out slowly until the end of the hose is covered then you can open it full. At this point I prefer the bucket as I can use that motion to swirl the beer any sediment is then moved and collected in the middle and I siphon to the bottles from the side.

The consensus is cold crash for a few day prior to bottling day.

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Palmer says to skim the floating stuff. It does taste bad. I thought of it today, sanitized my spoon and all. But as the wort drained, much of the stuff stuck to the sides. I didn't want to chase it all over the fermenter through that modest opening, so I left it in, but labelled the funky bottles.

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Cold crashing as a few have suggested is one approach, but for clear beer, another is at the time of brewing. You can add Irish Moss or whirlfloc (Irish Moss in tablet form) toward the end of a hop boil, say 1/4 tsp for LBK-size for the last 15 minutes, simply adding it without a hop sack. My own experience is limited since my own preference is for dark beers, which have a side benefit because you couldn't see the difference anyway. But when I have used Irish Moss in lighter beers, it seems to work well. If others can correct my quantity, procedure, etc., I'd like to get the info since it has been hard to find good info.

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Just for S-N-Gs, I tried something gymrat did a thread on. I had a batch I went commando with 10 oz of hops in an IPA. It looked like split pea soup. Actually, did 2 things to it. I used gelatin to clear up the batch and put it in the chill box at 36 degrees for a 4 days. When I transfered this to a keg, I could not believe just how clear it was! I had to pinch myself to make sure I was not dreaming, I have never had a beer that clear! I have not drank this yet as it's a recent batch but I think it is going to be extremely clear. I usually don't care about my beers being clear, like I said I did this just to say I did it. I don't know if you want to go to this extreme, keep it on your bucket list to try someday. I did feel like I lost a lot of beer doing it this way, but that could have been chalked up to my learning experience. I don't think I would do it myself on an LBK sized batch do the the amount I lost. Just throwing this out there for s-n-gs.

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"Wilson29" post=358533 said:

"Nightman" post=358523 said:

Using a second lbk is a good idea to help reduce sediment and a good time to try batch priming. Its more equipment to clean but IMO easier to do. Cold crashing would also help.


No Straining after fermenting make good beer taste bad. :sick:

Now I'm confused. If I'm going to transfer to a second LBK, why can't I run it through a strainer? Is it the strainer that's adds oxygen? My ultimate goal is to keep all the stuff floating on top out of my bottles.

You would use a wand or tube to fill from one fermenter to the next.

I'll agree with those that say to cold crash before bottling, as to how many days I can not say. No more than three I'd say.

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For better clarity, try these things:

1) be careful handling your fermenter as you're getting ready to bottle. Sloshing it around will re-suspend trub into the brew and make it cloudy.

2) use Whirlfloc. 1/2 tablet in a 5-gallon batch. It's cheap and effective.

3) Let the wort settle 10-15 min before moving it into the fermenter and try to leave as much gunk behind in the kettle as you can

4) after fermentation is complete, cold crash 3-5 days at 35-38*F before bottling

5) if kegging, try gelatin finings.

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"BigFloyd" post=358617 said:

For better clarity, try these things:
5) if kegging, try gelatin finings.

Just curious, do u do this when U keg? I think someone said that in the gelatin thread. If so, how does that work out? Is it better to do it this way, or the way I tried it?

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