Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
BlackDuck

White IPA - 2013 Spring Seasonal

Recommended Posts

Abqu said

But if you're going solely off of the MrB product page, with a target OG of 1.063 and a FG of 1.006, that's nearly 90% attenuation, which is pretty crazy.

I had an OG of 1.067 and using only half the T-58 yeast my FG was 1.01 or 7.4% ABV. I added 1 teaspoon of honey after 14 days and it fermented at room temperature the whole 3 weeks, which this time of the year is 69-71 degrees. Also as part of my standard practice for every beer I make I dip a toothpick in pure olive oil and then after it drains I swish it in my wort. I read about that here many months ago and now incorporate that as part of my SOP.

So I was pretty close to achieving what MrBeer claimed. I can't account for the wide range of results posted here by others.

I had my 3rd bottle after conditioning for 3 weeks and its better than at week 1 and 2. It is a very pleasant beer and I would buy it again if it were to become a standard offering but it would have to be priced at the $15-16 range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"mrblase" post=376871 said:

Abqu said

But if you're going solely off of the MrB product page, with a target OG of 1.063 and a FG of 1.006, that's nearly 90% attenuation, which is pretty crazy.

I had an OG of 1.067 and using only half the T-58 yeast my FG was 1.01 or 7.4% ABV. I added 1 teaspoon of honey after 14 days and it fermented at room temperature the whole 3 weeks, which this time of the year is 69-71 degrees. Also as part of my standard practice for every beer I make I dip a toothpick in pure olive oil and then after it drains I swish it in my wort. I read about that here many months ago and now incorporate that as part of my SOP.

So I was pretty close to achieving what MrBeer claimed. I can't account for the wide range of results posted here by others.

I had my 3rd bottle after conditioning for 3 weeks and its better than at week 1 and 2. It is a very pleasant beer and I would buy it again if it were to become a standard offering but it would have to be priced at the $15-16 range.


Just finished reading the olive oil discussion from a few months ago... Great info, and will use the method on my next can of white Ipa to compare results... Thanks for the tip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sunday night 11:00 pm took my FG reading after 3.5 days with Beano and 4.5 days after pitching nottingham... Came in @ 1.013 which is 5 points lower then 4 days ago. Also had dry hopped with another 1/2 oz Falconers flight over these 4 days. The results? This is now a totally different beer, in fact my hydro sample although as nasty as any green beer, fit the MB description of a "Belgian with melon and citrus hop flavors" and also had a believable 60 IBU. Originally I planned on using no priming sugar at bottling and allowing the beer to ferment out to 1.010 or so... But I like it @ 1.013 so used dextrose to prime. Will monitor bottle pressure closely so that I can time my cold crash before to much carbonation builds up. It will be interesting to see if the beer will condition "normally" with the yeast deactivated but the beano still operating very slowly in the cold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I drank my first few of the White IPA this past weekend. While I'm not usually to keen on the spice scene ... the spice seems to fit the profile of this beer very well ... delicious.

Mr B does it again!

Nice. :gulp:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I threw 1/2 filled trub bottle of my modded one in the fridge... 3 weeks in the bottle... we will see!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After having the LBK upstairs in a warmer room for approximately 24 hours, I took a hydro sample. It's still at 1.020. I don't think it's going any lower than that, so I guess I'll bottle it. I'm a bit disappointed that the numbers don't have up with what Mr Beer claims.

I'm wondering, for my second batch, if it might make sense to only pitch half of the yeast and then, after a week, pitch the second half of the package. 11g is way more than is necessary for an LBK anyway, so I'm thinking that if I let half a pack do the heavy lifting during the primary fermentation, adding the second half afterward might allow it to "finish up" whatever the first batch didn't get and come down to a lower FG. Does that sound like it would work? I'm still learning, so it that's a ridiculous idea, please let me know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just learning too... But I can tell you this much, the 1st batch I did with us-05 to Make an "American" wheat fermented @ 62-64 deg for 3 weeks with no fooling around at all and by bottling time got down to 1.014 while my t-58 batch started @ 62-64 1st week then @ 70-74 deg for the final two weeks stuck at 1.018! I am willing to bet that if I gave the us-05 the same temps and rousing 2x it could have gotten to 1.012 no problem. I pitched danstar nottingham @ week 3 to try to restart the t-58 batch but it didn't work, and this is even more aggressive IMO then what you are suggesting by repitching the T-58 after the action slows. Here is what I am going to try next... 1st I'm going to use the olive oil tip from Mrblase, 2nd I'm going to blend 1/2 pack t-58 with 1/2 pack us-05 to try to combine the Belgion flavors with the higher attenuation. If anyone has ever tried anything like blended 2 yeasts like this please give advice... Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO, if Nottingham did not restart the T-58 batch, then there isn't anything fermentable in there for the yeast to eat, or the wort is so nutrient lacking that it's just not happy. Nottingham ferments anything.

The olive oil will increase the number of happy daughter cells that grow, similar to oxygenating your wort. This will make more daughter cells which are hungry and will eat sugar. But a full pack of T-58 has plenty of cells and should have fermented fine too.

My suggestion would be to use Wyeast French Saison or Danstar Bella Saison. That yeast will eat all sorts of things that nothing else will. It also has a similar peppery flavor profile to the T-58. It should ferment this thing down below 1.008 no problem no matter what they did to it.

For the record my beer with T-58 finished at 1.014 or something like that, it was below the 1.02s some folks are reporting. 1.014 isn't crazy high considering the OG. Mr. Beers numbers for estimated FG are what's crazy, UNLESS you use Saison yeast.

RE: Mixing yeasts, it's fine as long as they yeasts don't make flavors that don't get along, but it's difficult to get a reproducible beer when you do it. You want to pitch the yeast you want dominant flavor wise first for sure... then maybe 3 days later pitch the other yeast. In this case, T-58 first and then S-05 or Notty later.

Only problem I see there is the right fermentation temps for T-58 after a week are way higher then you want to ferment with Notty. Even S-05 I'd not like in the 70s.

So really I would NOT suggest mixing those strains.

The answer if you want a lower FG IMHO is to use French Saison yeast. You will get a similar yet more complex flavor profile but a lot drier beer, and it will be smooth and silky feeling when you drink it even though it's dry. French saison yeast is weird like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone point me toward the olive oil tip being discussed? I tried doing a forum search but couldn't find it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you Packerduf for posting the link. Interesting article, and it seems to me to suggest that the use of olive oil is worth trying. The amount of olive oil is tiny in comparison with the amount of yeast, let alone the wort volume, so any effect on flavor would be the result of different yeast activity rather than the actual taste of the olive oil. It's too late for me to try that with my Spring Seasonal, but I will try it on my next batch of beer. It would certainly make sense to use a little olive oil when harvesting yeast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UPDATE: I drank my second one last night, after giving a few away to friends and family.

I'm going with "I'm not a huge Belgian fan" although I have had a few that I like. I think the combination of the lemon and the strong yest profile here has just made a beer that isn't my favorite - which is OK. Half the fun of both brewing and tasting beers is trying new things and staying open-minded.

I was thinking this would be more of a wheat beer, though. The darn thing is crystal clear.

Here is the really interesting thing:
As I suspected, this thing fermented more once I added the priming sugar. My FG when I bottled was 1.021 after 22 days in the LBK. I tried rousing the yeast and warming it up but that is where it finished.

I poured some of my beer into my hydrometer last night and let it go flat overnight so I could measure it this morning - - - - - 1.014. That confirmed what I thought after opening the first bottle and getting a VERY high level of carb (like a wheat).

So, food for thought for those that get stuck around 1.020. Try feeding it a bit of sugar to kick things off again (I don't recall if mashani recommended this or not but it wouldn't surprise me if he did).

20130604080722.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Kealia" post=377362 said:

Here is the really interesting thing:
As I suspected, this thing fermented more once I added the priming sugar. My FG when I bottled was 1.021 after 22 days in the LBK. I tried rousing the yeast and warming it up but that is where it finished.

I poured some of my beer into my hydrometer last night and let it go flat overnight so I could measure it this morning - - - - - 1.014. That confirmed what I thought after opening the first bottle and getting a VERY high level of carb (like a wheat).

I had a concern in the back of my head that this might happen, so I made the decision to bottle in plastic instead of glass for this batch. I figured that if I ended up with bottle bombs, it would be safer to have plastic bottles exploding than glass ones.

I'm looking forward to this one, but expecting high levels of carbonation due to the fact that it seems to be already partially carbed right out of the LBK (as others have already mentioned).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting Ron....I put about about 5 bottles in the fridge last night to drink later this week. I was one of the lucky ones to end at 1.022. I poured my first bottle a week or so ago and it wasn't overly carbed at all. We shall see later this week. Who knows....for the purpose of science, I just may open one tonight. Another thing that is a surprise to me is the clarity. I was expecting it to be slightly cloudy like a wheat based beer normally is, but these seem to be finishing crystal clear.

It's just odd to me that the results of this seem to be all over the place. Doesn't seem like a very consistent product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"BlackDuck" post=377378 said:

Another thing that is a surprise to me is the clarity. I was expecting it to be slightly cloudy like a wheat based beer normally is, but these seem to be finishing crystal clear.

That's exactly what I expected, too. This one is a bit of enigma.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Curiosity got the best of me and I sampled one at 2.5 weeks in the bottle. Carbonation was good - had about an inch of head in the glass which disappeared after about 2 or 3 minutes (I helped by drinking it). It was very clear....probably the clearest batch I've ever made. That's ok by me, I don't care too much about clarity anyways. The taste was surprisingly very good. I was expecting decent to good, but this was very good. Definitely definitely definitely NOT an IPA by any means (not sure what MrB was thinking on that one), but it is a very good Belgian-style (hybrid?) beer. I could pick up the citrus very well, and there was a very faint fruity/bubble gum-like undertone to it. I dry hopped cascades but I couldn't detect a hop presence at all. I expect it to get a little better in the next couple of weeks, but I think I can bet on it not having much hop presence at all. Not as expected, but overall I'm pleased with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"OikoEco" post=377457 said:

Curiosity got the best of me and I sampled one at 2.5 weeks in the bottle.

Since this essentially a wheat beer (albeit a bit of a unique one), that's probably not a problem. Wheats usually condition out quicker, don't they?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"asnider" post=377461 said:

"OikoEco" post=377457 said:

Curiosity got the best of me and I sampled one at 2.5 weeks in the bottle.

Since this essentially a wheat beer (albeit a bit of a unique one), that's probably not a problem. Wheats usually condition out quicker, don't they?

Yeah, but I was a little worried about the high OG (and ABV) and the possible effect it may have on conditioning time. In general, though, you are right - a low gravity wheat should be drinkable in about 2 weeks (IMHO, anyways). :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I'm drinking my trub bottle of my hopped up can of this. It's 3 weeks in the bottle.

If you do not recall, I did my own take on the hopped up Mr. Beer recipe version, where I added 1 full oz of Nelson Sauvin hops, 1/2 split between a flavoring addition, an aroma addition, and the other 1/2 a 20 minute hop stand. I had added a bit of DME for the hops to play in. I overfilled some to make up for the DME addition, I was not going for "stronger" beer, just amped up flavor/aromas.

I have no idea what this beer is supposed to taste like but I like how this turned out. It does taste a bit green, but ignoring that, what I have here is a bastard son of Fantome Blanche and Anchor Humming. And that's not a bad thing. I think the grapeyness of the Nelson is what's really pushing it into the Fantome territory, that beer has a funky grape skin / winey thing going on top of the typical wit beer flavors along with a lemony twist, and this has all that going on along with the spicy/funky fruit from the T-58 (I let mine get really warm after a week as I typically do with Belgiany things).

It does not taste too sweet. It finished around 1.014, and I carbed it to something like 3.6 volumes which adds perceived bitterness and makes all the fruity/spicy flavors stand out more too. All that nelson probably added close to 20 IBUs as well, even though it was a late addition.

I'd be happy to brew it again, but it also does make me think even more that this would make a good base for a wicked 4.something gallon batch of wheaty saison, and I think I'm going that route with my second can. Twice as much beer for not much more money, I'm not going to pass up that. I'll post up a recipe with my thoughts later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Rebel_B" post=373377 said:

Just brewed up my first one this evening, no mods; OG: 1.058


[attachment=13462]image_2013-05-19.jpg[/attachment]

Checked the gravity on this one, after 16 days in the fermenter: 1.018, super cloudy, slight banana aromas, tastes good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got my Imperial White IPA from 1.086 to 1.016!!!! 72-75* during ferm. 80%attenuation!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(6/6/13) I drank another one last night. It's been almost 2 weeks since I posted the first pour. And boy did this thing change in that time frame. As I've stated before, this is surprisingly clear, especially how cloudy it was to start with. As for an IPA....I don't think so, not even close.

If you recall, I said I was getting something that I couldn't figure out, and a lot of you suggested it was the Pride of Ringwood hops. I'm not sure if that's it or not, but I'm not getting that flavor much anymore. What I am getting now is a ton of banana, almost too much of it for me. It's pretty much hiding anything else that might be in this beer. It's so much so, that I probably can't drink two of these back to back.

I'm actually quite disappointed in this one. IMHO, it's not even close to how MB described this: "This White IPA is a flavorsome modification of a traditional IPA. An exciting fusion of complex citrus and melon hop flavors characteristics to an American IPA, balanced with coriander, orange peel, lemon and the velvety characters of wheat malt typical of a Belgian Witbier. Pale in color with a tightly packed white head, spicy notes and crisp finish." I'm getting no melon, very little citrus from the orange and lemon and no coriander flavor. And MB never mentions anything about banana, which I think is it's primary profile.

So, this is going to be a slowly consumed batch for me as this is definitely not a favorite of mine. But, since it will be around for a while, it will be interesting to see if and how it changes over a long conditioning time. I'll keep posting my thoughts as I drink these in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should not have gotten much banana from the T-58 unless you did active fermentation in the 70s, or unless the yeast got stressed out in some way (too cold, didn't pitch enough, it was half dead in the package, ?) T-58 is more of a clove/pepper/spice producer in the low-mid 60s.

I do not consider it a yeast to use when I want banana, I go with WLP500 for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really don't know what happened then. It fermented in the high 60's and I pitched the entire packet according to Fermentis directions. All I know is mine is full of banana. Oh well, I will drink them eventually!!!!

Edit...maybe the high FG has something to do with it????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with you Chris. I've given all but two bottles away at this point.
One I've kept in the fridge for the past 2 weeks and the other is still warm conditioning.

Other than those two, I won't be drinking any more of this one. There's not enough wheat presence for me and the yeast and lemon are in the forefront for me. I won't go on record saying that this is a bad beer, but I think it's just the style I don't care for.

I've given a few to co-workers who like belgians so I will see what they say about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@BlackDuck:

Did your krausen vanish after say 2 days? If it was in the upper 60s when you first saw krausen and then you went to bed or to work, it might have gone into the upper 70s for 4-6 hours, fermented like mad, krausen fell back down and temps dropped back down to the upper 60s over the next few hours. T-58 can spike your fermentation temps by up to 10 degrees when it gets into happy mode. It's best to keep it in the low 60s when it's starting to krausen, because it will hit 68-70 all by itself once it gets going and that doesn't take long.

That would make banana, and also getting the yeast anywhere above 70 tends to make some funky musty stone fruit like flavors. I do not have banana, or if I do it's buried under all the nelson sauvin I used - but I do have some of the funky stone fruit, but I did that on purpose by raising it into the lower 70s after my krausen fell to finish there. I didn't let it get over 70 until after my krausen fell, I put it on my cold shelf to start.

@Kealia:

Do you like Saisons Kealia? If I do the 2 LBK 4+ gallon split to make Saison with my other can (most likely), maybe I can put aside a 12ozer for you to try out. Everything about this beer screams "turn it into a Saison" to me. I think it will make a good one, even if it doesn't make a good "White IPA".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mashani...good thoughts on what might have happened. I don't remember exactly when the Krausen fell, but I think I remember that it seemed to ferment pretty darn quick. So the temp spikes may very well be the culprit here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[map][/map]

"Rebel_B" post=377678 said:

"Rebel_B" post=373377 said:

Just brewed up my first one this evening, no mods; OG: 1.058


image_2013-06-07.jpg[/attachment]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mashani, I do like some saisons/farmhouse ales so I guess I shouldn't generalize and say I don't like belgian beers. Maybe it's the lemon that I'm picking up that is turning me off. I tried a soriachi ace a while back and couldn't drink that so maybe I'm not attributing this face :sick: to the right thing :cheer:

I'd gladly do a swap with you down the road if you are so inclined, sir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"BlackDuck" post=378003 said:

I really don't know what happened then. It fermented in the high 60's and I pitched the entire packet according to Fermentis directions. All I know is mine is full of banana. Oh well, I will drink them eventually!!!!

Edit...maybe the high FG has something to do with it????

That almost makes me want to intentionally let the next batch ferment toward the high end of the range, since SWMBO loves banana flavours in her wheat beers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Kealia" post=378267 said:

mashani, I do like some saisons/farmhouse ales so I guess I shouldn't generalize and say I don't like belgian beers. Maybe it's the lemon that I'm picking up that is turning me off. I tried a soriachi ace a while back and couldn't drink that so maybe I'm not attributing this face :sick: to the right thing :cheer:

I'd gladly do a swap with you down the road if you are so inclined, sir.

Must be the lemon.

I like "A Sorachi Ace" (Brooklyn Brewery) quite much if that's the beer you are referring to. Bone dry and lemony...

Everyone's different :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"JPMSVT" post=376920 said:

Sunday night 11:00 pm took my FG reading after 3.5 days with Beano and 4.5 days after pitching nottingham... Came in @ 1.013 which is 5 points lower then 4 days ago. Also had dry hopped with another 1/2 oz Falconers flight over these 4 days. The results? This is now a totally different beer, in fact my hydro sample although as nasty as any green beer, fit the MB description of a "Belgian with melon and citrus hop flavors" and also had a believable 60 IBU. Originally I planned on using no priming sugar at bottling and allowing the beer to ferment out to 1.010 or so... But I like it @ 1.013 so used dextrose to prime. Will monitor bottle pressure closely so that I can time my cold crash before to much carbonation builds up. It will be interesting to see if the beer will condition "normally" with the yeast deactivated but the beano still operating very slowly in the cold.


Bottles have become firm and carb is where I want it within 4.5 days... Have begun cold crashing @ about 36 - 38 deg to deactivate yeast and prevent beer from drying out too much & cause over carbed bottle bombs... 1/2 oz Falconers flight for 15 min + 1/2 oz dry hopped helped this beer become the Ipa it was intended to be... Will update after a couple weeks conditioning and let you know if this experiment worked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just had my first taste tonight at 4 weeks in the bottle. I dry hopped with Citra, but otherwise brewed straight up. I like it but more as a Witbier. The dry hop did give some hop aroma, but the beer is no where near to being a White IPA. Widmer Brothers White IPA is my favorite of that style, and this one tastes nothing at all like that. I did note the coriander and orange flavors and the definitely like the wheat flavors.
It is surprisingly clear. It will be interesting to see how this ages.
Overall I like it, but it is not a home run like the previous Seasonals were.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally bottled up my first batch of the seasonal after the gravity finally dropped to 1.012... 6.0% ABV.


[attachment=13764]image_2013-06-10.jpg[/attachment]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I posted the recipe that I'm going to use to totally destroy / bastardize / demolish / mangle and/or mutilate my second can in the advanced recipe topic. If you have 2 LBKs, and you like hoppy saisons, and you don't like this beer as an IPA, it may be worth a read for ideas on how to frankenbier a second can and get twice as much beer. (I'm 99% sure it's going to make good beer).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Rebel_B" post=379033 said:

I finally bottled up my first batch of the seasonal after the gravity finally dropped to 1.012... 6.0% ABV.


[attachment=13764]image_2013-06-10.jpg[/attachment]

Hey look! Your hydrometer says you made beer!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"mashani" post=379039 said:

I posted the recipe that I'm going to use to totally destroy / bastardize / demolish / mangle and/or mutilate my second can in the advanced recipe topic. If you have 2 LBKs, and you like hoppy saisons, and you don't like this beer as an IPA, it may be worth a read for ideas on how to frankenbier a second can and get twice as much beer. (I'm 99% sure it's going to make good beer).

Not 100%? Well, I'd better let you try it first then. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"mashani" post=379039 said:

I posted the recipe that I'm going to use to totally destroy / bastardize / demolish / mangle and/or mutilate my second can in the advanced recipe topic. If you have 2 LBKs, and you like hoppy saisons, and you don't like this beer as an IPA, it may be worth a read for ideas on how to frankenbier a second can and get twice as much beer. (I'm 99% sure it's going to make good beer).

Hmmmm......sounds very interesting. I may even harvest the Belgium Saison yeast I currently have fermenting. Think that would work or is the differences between those 2 yeast strains too much?


Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@rickbray66

Both will work, but they will leave different results.

French saison is less finicky about fermenting things out. It just works as long as you get it into the 70s, where the Belgian stuff likes to get stuck and won't finish unless you get your temps into the 80s or even 90s.

French Saison does not make bubblegum, where the Belgian Saison does. It is less fruity in general, lets more of the more spicy flavor come through.

Both leave some tartness behind, but the French Saison it's more lemony, where the Belgian Saison it's just more of a "general tartness". I'm not saying that in a bad way, it's just different.

If you want to ferment the entire time between 80-100 degrees then Belgian Saison will still make good beer assuming you like bubblegummy saisons like Dupont. It's perhaps the only yeast I'd use with temps that high. I'd not go above 85 with the French, and only that high > 2 weeks into the fermentation, it's best to keep it in the 70s for most of it in my experience.

Both can ferment out to crazy 90%+ attenuation levels if they are kept happy.

French Saison leaves more mouthfeel at the same level of attenuation. I can not explain why in a scientific manner, but it does.

I personally like the flavor profile of French Saison better, but Belgian Saison makes good beer too. I used the Belgian in my sorachi ginger saison and it's quite yummy now that the ginger bitterness has mellowed out with age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've not tried the French Saison yeast yet, but I have made a few batches with the Belgium and found the very things you mentioned. My first saison has been the only batch that took longer than 4 weeks to complete fermentation. It stayed in the lower 70s and I guessed that was the factor. When I tried it again later in the summer and kept temp around 80, it finished in under 3 weeks.

Both batches were really tasty though.

Many thanks for the info. I'm leaning towards giving this a try.


Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if you don't want to go all out nuts like I did, just brewing it straight up and replacing the T-58 with Bella Saison or Wyeast French Saison should get you better attenuation and a similar but more complex flavor profile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just tasted my second bottle of this one and wow, what a change in 1 week. It seems more balanced now, I can definitely taste the spices, and the Citra dry hop is evident. Still not an IPA, but a pretty damn good summer wheat beer. I am glad I bought a second can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"docpd" post=379789 said:

I just tasted my second bottle of this one and wow, what a change in 1 week. It seems more balanced now, I can definitely taste the spices, and the Citra dry hop is evident. Still not an IPA, but a pretty damn good summer wheat beer. I am glad I bought a second can.

That sounds cool. I just bottled up my first batch last Sunday, and my hydrometer sample tasted pretty righteous; hoping it will turn out to be a tasty summer drinking ale, 'IPA' did NOT jump into my thoughts, but pretty good tasting on the sample.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear that this one hasn't panned out for everyone. I think from what I'm reading that Mash is on target... Grab some saison yeast for this one, gents...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"BDR" post=376816 said:

Just finished brewing mine straight up, 1.064 OG so we shall see how it goes :)

Just for kicks I pulled a sample out for the hydrometer, 1.013 after 11 days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sampled my first bottle yesterday and was pleased with the results. Some hop bitterness noted in the background, nice spice and citrus flavors & aromas up front. Very refreshing hot weather beer I think as summer rolls in.

Will brew the El Diablo Blanco IPA version of the spring seasonal later in the week. Glad I got a couple more cans of this stuff to experiment with the saison yeast too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first batch of Spring Seasonal went in the fridge Friday, in about two weeks I will be sampling it, I will know then what it is like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"onekyds" post=380327 said:

My first batch of Spring Seasonal went in the fridge Friday, in about two weeks I will be sampling it, I will know then what it is like.

Why two weeks in the fridge? You're not trying to carb and condition it in the fridge are you? That won't work. The yeast will go dormant and the beer will stay flat. You need to condition it at room temperature.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fermented it 3 weeks, and carbonated it 4, normally I keep my beer in the fridge 2 weeks before drinking it. I tried one out today, it is good, but not my favorite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"onekyds" post=380464 said:

I fermented it 3 weeks, and carbonated it 4, normally I keep my beer in the fridge 2 weeks before drinking it. I tried one out today, it is good, but not my favorite.

OK, cool. I just wanted to make sure that you making a mistake and getting bad beer as a result. :whistle:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm drinking a more fully conditioned bottle of my modded version where I added a bit of DME, and 1/2l oz of Nelson Sauvon between T-15 and T-5, and then another 1/2oz in a hopstand, and overfilled a bit to make up for the DME addition.

I like it. It's still like Fantome Blanche had a baby with Anchor Humming, but more towards the Anchor Humming side of things now. So a bit more IPA like and less weird Wit Bier like.

I poured the thing over an hour ago and it still has head, so I'm happy with that. I did carb it somewhat highly then a normal IPA, since it's a wit/Belgian mix, so that is likely helping.

So my basic suggestion for those who want this to be really IPA ish is to add a full ounce of high AA hops as a hopburst/hop stand. I think anything that would be good in an IPA will work fine.

Even though I like it I'm not sorry I bastardized my other can into 4.6 gallons of Saison... I'm sure that will be good too, and I get 2x the beer for not much more $$.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im diggin it. Not much of a helmet but some lacing and a subtle fruitiness. I think the Sorachi Ace I used in hopstand and dry hop; it was an excellent choice.

My wife took me out to a place last week for birthday that has 140+ beers on tap. I had a double white IPA in preparation for the seasonal being ready this week. I think it was called Dooseldorfs or some name like that and I liked it a lot. I think this relates to it with a crisper finish. I did use booster to prime it so that may have played a roll. I had an arrogant bastard that night since Id never had one be4. I found it bitter, intrusive and just plain awful. I dont know if thats an IPA but I didnt appreciate it and that will be my first and last of that.

So my point is, maybe an IPA falls into that category for IBUs from a particular hop. For instance 30 IBUs from magnum is a lot different than 30 IBUs of Fuggles.

Whatever the case, I like it and will do up my 2nd can in a similar fashion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it me ,or is this the seasonal that has taken the longest amount of time to sell out? I've never seen two seasonal brews overlap one other. In the past, seasonal brews were gone within a few weeks. This seasonal, just was not that good. The Dubbel from 2 years ago was great though. I still have one can of the "White IPA",and will either give it away or brew it unenthusiastically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Overlap? I didn't realize the summer seasonal was available already! I'll have to check it out and see if it is one I can justify paying the shipping for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll put it to you this way. I went to the LHBS,and bought some grains for a 5 gal BIAB- Rye-Citra-IPA. It cost me exactly $25 plus 6 for the yeast. This will be an incredible beer, for $31, no doubts, no questions. The white IPA was simply false advertising. I was enthusiastic buying this, because it's a whole new beer style, and I liked all the ones I tried previously. The IBUs seemed like they were at 15 Ibus instead of 60, like they claimed. My second can of this stuff will simply go to waste, or be given away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll take that can beer brother. Meet me at DeCicco's Armonk Friday 4:00PM. I'll add it to my Super Atomic Ridiculous Double Imperial Sour Rye Wheat IPA which I'm brewing this weekend. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried a three week bottle. Not ready. But I recently drank Saranac and Blue Point White IPAs and loved them. I'll be happy if it makes decent beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"JohnSand" post=380912 said:

I tried a three week bottle. Not ready. But I recently drank Saranac and Blue Point White IPAs and loved them. I'll be happy if it makes decent beer.

My first batch is due to hit the fridge on Monday. That'll be 4 weeks of conditioning time. I'm looking forward to finally tasting this for myself!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Beerlabelman" post=380911 said:

I'll take that can beer brother. Meet me at DeCicco's Armonk Friday 4:00PM. I'll add it to my Super Atomic Ridiculous Double Imperial Sour Rye Wheat IPA which I'm brewing this weekend. :cheers:


Wow, they're already open? This is one place I'll be hitting a lot. I can do next week, not this week though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha Ha - Good times are on tap - 20- 24 taps, not sure. 2 indoor Bocce Courts, fireplace, - all in a food store!
Text, e-mail & I'll meet you there & I still want that can of White IPA. :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds awesome. I just got a 20 gal pot and a nice plate chiller with 30 plates, that can chill down to whatever temp the tap the water is in 5 mins. I'm gonna test it out next week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am currently drinking my first pint of this seasonal. While I definitely wouldn't call it an IPA, and I'm a bit sad that it's not quite what I expected when I purchased the refill, it is a pretty good Belgian-style witbier. I'll probably do my second can El Diablo style to get a bit more of the hoppy goodness that I was hoping for, but I'm also tempted to use a saison yeast as mashani has suggested. I haven't decided which I'd prefer yet.

Either way, I'm hoping I can get the second can to attenuate down enough to get the 6.5% ABV that Mr. Beer has advertised for this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"asnider" post=382077 said:


Either way, I'm hoping I can get the second can to attenuate down enough to get the 6.5% ABV that Mr. Beer has advertised for this one.

A bunch of false advertising on this one. Not a Belgian White IPA, and nowhere close to the 6.5 ABV as advertised nor the 60+ IBUs. Something went wrong here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally drinking this. I left the spice packet out and brewed just the kit. It's got too much clove and banana, very much like a Belgian Pale/Golden which would be fine if it was advertised as such. Not impressed with this seasonal at all. The IPA label was really misleading.

On a better note I had yet another Winter Dark Ale tonight (running dangerously low despite making several batches) and it was a good sanity check of what a great seasonal Mr. Beer can produce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm down to my last bottle of this MB seasonal and I have to admit that I've been cheating a bit, 1/2 to 3/4 glass of the MB and then topped off with a dipa. Last couple times I used Lagunuitas Hop Stupid and it was very very good, lesson learned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After 6 weeks in the bottle this is turning into a damn good Belgian Witbier. Too bad it was advertised as a White IPA. Anyway, it is a good beer and I am glad I bought 2 cans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"docpd" post=382284 said:

After 6 weeks in the bottle this is turning into a damn good Belgian Witbier. Too bad it was advertised as a White IPA. Anyway, it is a good beer and I am glad I bought 2 cans.

It's true. It really is a good beer, it just isn't what was advertised.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cracked open my first bottle of this after a month in the bottles. Didn't have much head and what there was didn't last too long. Cracked open like a soda and is a bit more carbed like others have said. Used domino dots like usual but wish I had gone with a bit less now. As for the taste it's not too bad, actually better than I thought after my sampling at bottling. Definitely not what MB advertised it as, but a good witbier as others have said. Just wish the carbonation was a bit less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carb too high, if you used the normal amount of sugar you normally do, likely means that it wasn't really done fermenting... Maybe T-58 just doesn't like it much for some reason, although I've never had personal issues with T-58, but I tend to ramp up temps after 3 days and/or add sugar feedings in my Belgians. Mine got to 1.014ish range vs. the 1.020 some folks got. I didn't expect T-58 to ferment out much more then that, for this OG if it got to 1.012 it would have been surprising without sugar or mashing low IMHO.

That said, using 1 pack of Bella Saison (which is the same strain as Wyeast 3711 I am convinced) split between a 2 lbk batch in my modded saison version I went from 1.050 to about 1.003ish in less then 3 weeks fermenting at 72-76 degrees... so I'd say the can of stuff can ferment out quite well if the yeast likes it. That yeast is particularly beastly however, it tends to like to eat everything and then some.

So, I would really suggest anyone who wants to dry there second can out goes with Bella Saison or 3711 instead of T-58. That will get you much drier more bitter seeming beer, even if it doesn't get quite as low as I did above. The flavor profile is similar, just a bit more complex/intense. (I use T-58 as a 3711 sub and add more sugar to dry the beer out for my pseudo-saisons when I don't have true saison temps).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a variance in temp ranges is the key. All within the recommended ranges but not at a stable temp. I forget my FG but the abv is around 6.4ish. Ive spent the afternoon downing a few and its quite deliche. Im thinking I was one of the lucky ones with this seasonal. It got me off the fitness couch this afternoon to brew the summer seasonal. Gonna brew that up as is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm now drinking my first barch of 2013 Spring Seasonal with spice, my second batch is without the spice, which I plan to be drinking the last week this month. I like my regular beers the best, the Seasonal beers are not for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cracked open the first. After two weeks in the bottle, still slightly green, but I would still rate it as the best batch I've made yet. Great flavor and aroma. Hops are there, you can taste a little bite. Not an IPA level, but much higher than most any witbeer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have brewed countless batches of MB. Kegged the White IPA in a 3 gallon keg and the first glass was without a doubt the worst beer I have ever tasted. Tried a second glass and it promptly went down the drain with the entire batch to follow. 2 weeks in LBK. Secondary for 10 days in glass and 4 weeks in keg to carb. Plenty of carb and great head on it. Tasted like soap. I don't use soap in my kegs. Starsan in everything. After all these years this is my first failure. I have another can. Maybe try again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just drank my first "real" glass of Spring Seasonal. I'm quite happy with it. It's been in the bottles just under 2 months, and the only deviation from the standard instructions was 1/2 ounce of hops commando after a week or so of fermenting. One of the complaints people make seems to be that it's not really an IPA. I'm not an expert on the subject, but the beers that are called IPAs by their makers seem to be all over the place as far as bitterness is concerned. To my taste buds the Spring Seasonal doesn't seem to be nearly as bitter as Winter Dark Ale, but both are listed as 60 IBUs. The Spring Seasonal is more to my taste.

Anyway, I thought I'd throw in my 2 pfennigs worth about the finished product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had a couple at 2 weeks and another person, not my favorite but its not bad either and no complaints. Trying my best to keep my hands off them to let them condition out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm drinking my trub bottle right now and I am less than impressed. It's very malty. I was hoping that, just maybe, the trub bottle would be hoppier and more reminiscent of an IPA. Mostly, it's sweet and kind of awful. Thankfully, the normal bottles are a very good Belgian wit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll say it again, anyone who has a second can and wants it drier, pick up some Bella Saison or Wyeast French Saison. It will give you the intended kind of flavor profile, but drop it 10 or more points easily. That will let the bitterness come through more, make it less sweet. Use the T-58 in a Wheat beer or a Roggenbier or a Belgian blonde that you mash low or use 20% sugar in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm definitely going to take your advice on this one, Mashani. I've got a second can that I haven't brewed yet. My LHBS has a terrible yeast selection, so I may have to order online (alas, many online brewer supply stores don't ship to Canada).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can also add about 85-90IBU and it turns out good...of course I did also add some light DME (3/4#)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just put mine in to ferment(out of town a lot) my OG came in at around 1.055. I did boil 1/2 ounce of cascade hops for 10 minutes in the water before adding HME left it in the keg to hopefully kick up the bitterness and aroma a bit compared to some of the complaints. I am keeping it about 70 degrees for the first 3 days then may let it warm up a bit and see how it goes. Im hoping the extra hops gets over some of the issues others reported. Guess we will see

:gulp:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope it works well. I brewed mine straight up, and I don't like it much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"JohnSand" post=390121 said:

I hope it works well. I brewed mine straight up, and I don't like it much.

I'm not caring for this one much, either. Here's hoping the Summer seasonal works out better when I finally get to brewing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...