Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
RaleighBrewer

Northwest Pale Ale + Patriot Lager?

Recommended Posts

It's about that time to get the next LBK going! I happen to have a can of the NPA and a can of the Patriot, so I was curious to know if anyone has tried combining these two? How did it turn out?

This will be my first time possibly combining two cans of HME. Since one is a craft and the other a standard, are there any suggestions or changes I need to make to my process or timeframes? For my previous brews, I have been fermenting for a minimum of 3 weeks and conditioning for at least another 2-3+ (before putting in the fridge) with really good success. Will that be about the same for this? Not sure if it matters, but I am also using a packet of Safbrew S-33 yeast.

Any/all feedback on this recipe is much appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going mad scientist, and in my opinion there is nothing wrong with that. I've put three HME's together and it turned out to be a damn good beer, to bad they don't make those HME's anymore. I say go for it and let us know the results. I'm sure others will have differing opinions or maybe the same. It's your beer my friend.

edit

Looking over some of the recipes Patriot has been used with American Ale and American Light HME's so go for it and let us know how it goes.

S-33 would be a fine yeast to use for this beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"RaleighBrewer" post=365868 said:

are there any suggestions or changes I need to make to my process or timeframes? For my previous brews, I have been fermenting for a minimum of 3 weeks and conditioning for at least another 2-3+ (before putting in the fridge) with really good success.

In this case, you have the Northwest at about 5% ABV and the Patriot at about 3%. So, you're talking at least an 8% ABV beer. I'd let it condition about 6-to-8 weeks before you even try the first one. It might take longer, but that's where I would start.

On the positive side, with the 17 IBUs in the Patriot and the 43 in the Northwest, you're at 60. In a 1.080 beer that should work well. In fact, unless your beer goes above 1.093...you should be fine. Above that and I would suspect it's more sweet than balanced.

According to the info...the S-33 would work well here:

Fermentis Safbrew S-33 Dry Ale Yeast

Safale S-33 is a popular general purpose yeast that displays both robust conservation properties and consistent performance. This yeast produces superb flavor profiles and is used for a varied range of top fermented special beers including Belgian wheats and Trappists. The yeast has excellent performance in beers up to 7.5% alcohol content, but can ferment up to 11.5%.

Flocculation: Medium
Attenuation: High
Ideal fermentation Temperature: 59-75 F (15-24 C)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate the feedback, especially the info about conditioning it for and extra period of time due to the higher ABV.

As a general follow-up question, do higher ABV beers require a longer fermentation period, or is that timing still about the same? (which is about 3 weeks usually) If it requires more than 3 weeks, my schedule gets a bit hectic, so I may not be able to bottle until week 4-5 - would there be any hard in letting it go that long?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"RaleighBrewer" post=366374 said:

I appreciate the feedback, especially the info about conditioning it for and extra period of time due to the higher ABV.

As a general follow-up question, do higher ABV beers require a longer fermentation period, or is that timing still about the same? (which is about 3 weeks usually) If it requires more than 3 weeks, my schedule gets a bit hectic, so I may not be able to bottle until week 4-5 - would there be any hard in letting it go that long?

No, the fermentation is the same. Many beers will ferment in about 2 weeks. We will always suggest 3 just to make sure that all the clean-up is done...so 3 weeks in the fermentation is good. No need to go beyond that. Obviously a hydrometer would help...but the 3 weeks is also a good mark for people who don't have the hydrometer. At that point (week 3) there should be no doubts period about it being fermented and all the clean up having taken place.

The big deal regarding the time comes on the conditioning. Some beers like wheats or IPA are usually best young. But usually higher ABV beer are high because of the amount of malt in there. In order to truly settle out and have everything condition well...you extend the conditioning time on higher ABV beers. I have hear of stouts and high ABV Barleywine beers taking upward of 6-months or longer. Again...USUALLY the longer a beer conditions the better. Not always, but most of the time. And I would definitely tend to think that would apply to what you have going on here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate the feedback on the fermentation time. I'm 1 week into the fermentation process today and things look good. I'm planning to bottle it about a day shy of 3 weeks, then certainly plan on conditioning this one for more of an entended period of time due to the higher ABV.

I agree that most of the time the longer it conditions, the better - usually my last ones to go in the fridge at the end of a batch taste the best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...