Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
russki

Oaked Pear Cider Experiment - in progress (w/pics)

Recommended Posts

I've put my beer brewing on hold for now - it's hard to devote 6 hours to a brew day with a one month old... But I just can't stand the sight of empty fermenters. So I decided to experiment a bit - I've always wanted to make pear cider (or perry), and I came across a pretty good deal on a gallon jug of all natural pear juice concentrate. I'm still waiting for it to arrive, but here's my plan (for a 5.5 gallon batch):

- 1 gallon pear juice concentrate
- 4.5 gallons RO water
- 1# demerara sugar
- 2 tsp yeast nutrient
- 1 pack Nottingham yeast

From my research, OG should be around 1.070 or so. I plan to primary in a 6.5 gallon bucket for a few weeks, then rack into a 5-gallon carboy onto 2 oz of medium toast French oak cubes and leave until the desired level of oakiness is reached, then prime and bottle.

I will update when I actually make this - in the meantime, all comments are welcome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"SmokeDiver3zero" post=370518 said:

Is the gallon consentrate for 5 gallons?


Yes, it needs to be diluted 4:1 or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Concentrate people took their sweet time shipping it to me, but it had finally arrived on Friday, so I "brewed" this up yesterday. The spec sheet for the Pear Juice Concentrate listed it at 70 Brix - or roughly SG 1.400, so I decided to up the water to full 5 gallons for a slightly lower (still pretty high) OG.

Here are the ingredients (minus the yeast nutrient - forgot to put it in the picture):
- 1 gallon Pear Juice Concentrate
- 5 gallons RO-filtered water (using my RO filter)
- 1 pound turbinado sugar (couldn't find demerara that I wanted)
- 3 tsp yeast nutrient (decided to up it a bit to account for the high gravity must)
- 1 pack Danstar Nottingham dry ale yeast

I poured a couple gallons of water from the water jug into a clean sanitized bucket, then added the pear concentrate to the water jug and shook to combine and aerate. I then poured the sugar through a funnel into the now empty concentrate jug, along with the 3 tsp of yeast nutrient, added half a gallon of water from the bucket, and shook to dissolve completely. Once that was done, I just combined it all in the 6.5 gallon bucket, mixed with a sanitized spoon and took the gravity sample. I was lazy, so I just sprinkled the yeast on top, sealed the lid with airlock, and put it in the basement to ferment.

The color was much darker than anticipated - a very dark reddish amber. Very pretty. OG ended up at 1.076 or so - it was hard to tell with all the foam at the top.

The sample was super tasty - I ended up mixing most of it with a glass of ice tea!

Now I'm going to let it sit in the primary bucket for a couple of week or until the airlock activity slows down, then I will rack it off the yeast into a 5-gallon secondary carboy onto an ounce of medium toast French Oak cubes to age a while.

I'm hoping for a sweeter end product vs. apple cider - from what I've been reading, pear juice has more unfermentables than apple juice. Others have reported pear ciders finishing around 1.015-1.018 - that would be perfect. We shall see.

And now I wait...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Da Yooper" post=373496 said:

Where did you get the concentrate from?


It's from NaturesFlavors.com - they have all kinds of interesting flavorings and concentrates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So after 11 days, the airlock activity slowed down to pretty much nothing, which is a good point for a transfer to secondary. The yeast dropped almost completely clear, and the gravity was at 1.025. I sanitized an ounce of medium toast French oak cubes by boiling for 10 min, then racked pear cider on top of them into a 5-gallon PET carboy that I filled pretty much to the neck. I had enough left over to fill a 1/2 gallon growler as well. Both are sitting under airlocks.

At this point, it tasted great - very pronounced caramel sweetness with notes of cider tartness and just a touch of bitter. I hope it does not dry out too much in secondary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After 4 weeks in secondary with 1 oz of oak cubes, I took another sample - gravity is pretty much the same at 1.024-1.025; it's crystal clear, and is starting to pick up some oak.

Very tasty; not cloyingly sweet, with a nice caramel/molasses notes. Smells very pear-y. The color is a beautiful red:

[img size=500]http://img809.imageshack.us/img809/2942/u7u2.jpg

I will leave it on oak a while longer - another couple months at least. This should be a great winter drink.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...