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rods2lug

muslin bag

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Should the muslin bag provided with some recipes be sanitized before they are put in the wort with ingredients in it?

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Given that this is this particular member's first post, I'm going to assume that he's working solely with Mr. Beer recipes, and thus not doing extended boils.

Taking that assumption, I'm going to suggest the same thing Mr. Beer suggests: When you sanitize your LBK, your can opener, your spoon, your whisk, and whatever else you're sanitizing, toss your hop sack in there, too.

I would also recommend that you set aside a cup or so of sanitizing solution instead of dumping the whole thing out. It can be a life-saver if you drop a spoon or suddenly realize you forgot to sanitize something. Just some friendly suggestions from someone who's been there.

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Dave's right. The OP is more than likely a nOOb and won;t be adding ingredients or doing hops boils.

If it goes into the wort AFTER the boil (or in this case after heating up the HME) then it needs to be sanitized.

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"rods2lug" post=371096 said:

Should the muslin bag provided with some recipes be sanitized before they are put in the wort with ingredients in it?


Welcome aboard The Obsession rods2lug! If you're like the rest of us here you'll soon be awash in a sea of beer and setting sail on many great brewing adventures. There's lot's of information here and plenty of hands to help you get under way. You'll soon be producing some memorable beers and having a lot of fun too in the days ahead.

Navigate on over to our Advanced Brewing Techniques area of the forum and read over the

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417" target="_blank" title="http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417">'4 Things Every Brewer Should Know About Yeast'

sticky. Yeast is a living cell, keep them healthy and they'll ferment you up some awesome tasting beers.

Set your course and sail on over to our New Brewers and FAQs area of the forum and read over the 'Malt To Adjunct Ratios' sticky.

Remember for the best tasting beer you'll want no less than 80% of the alcohol to come from malts and no more than 20% of the alcohol to come from sugars or other adjuncts.

Give your beer at least 2-3 weeks to ferment and another 3-4 weeks to carbonate and condition before refrigerating. I know it's going to be hard to resist popping them open sooner, but like with anything homebrewing it'll be worth the wait.

When using any priming calculator enter the warmest temperature that your fermenting beer has endured between the time you pitched your yeast until bottling day. This has to do with the beer's residual level of Co2, or the ability for beer to absorb Co2 into solution during fermentation. For a typical Ale fermenting around 70F the residual Co2 will be around .83 volumes, which is then subtracted from whatever Co2 level you entered as your target.


Example 1: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 70F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 2: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 60F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 3: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 80F - Enter 80F for the temperature

Higher levels of Co2 will stay in solution when the beer is colder, as the beer warms up more Co2 will be released from solution. Hope that helps.

This is my glass of beer. There are many like it, but this one is mine. Without me my beer is useless. Without my beer, I am useless. ~ Screwy Brewer

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Boiling will kill all of the lifeforms you don't want getting into your beer, sometimes I boil oak chips right in the muslin sack and after cooling pour the bag and the water right into the fermentor. Like the others have said soaking anything in StarSan will do the same thing, only a lot quicker and easier than boiling.

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Yes I am just using Mr. Beer recipes and am new to home brewing. Doing the Belgium Blanc since it sounds like it is similar to Blue Moon which is one of the few beers my wife likes. It came with hops, and need to add coriander seed and orange zest into the bag. This will be my 5th batch.

I save the sanitizer in a large pot until I am done getting everything into the keg. I just keep any utensils in the pot full of sanitizer instead of on an open plate. When I bottle I save the sanitizer and then sanitize the keg after I am done bottling and washing the keg out before storing it. Then before using the keg for the next batch I sanitize again per insrtuctions.

Thanks all for your input.

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My next batch (third) is a first attempt at a MrB recipe, so includes a hop steep (pellets). Since this is post boil addition I should sanitize the muslin bag. Got that much.

Haerbob suggested skipping the muslin bag altogether. Any side affects like floating pellets when I bottle if I do it that way? (Curious, I think I'll use the bag this first time).

On prior posts I've seen suggestions to weight the bag... is that a matter of a couple (sanitized) stainless steel washers?

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When not using a muslin sac you may get a floatie. Most of it settles out but sometimes not. Its good practice to weight the sac but not necessary when starting out. I use stainless steel 1 inch ball bearings. 2 take it to the bottom.

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