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Sasha Brew

To bottle or not?

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Hiyo!

I'm brewing for the second time and not sure if my beer is done fermenting. Maybe someone can help, here's whats going on-My beer has been fermenting for 3 weeks, I added 1 can of blackberries and a half cup brown sugar to the irish stout mix. The air temperature has been a little warmer than recommended due to the rediculously hot weather here in the PNW. I tasted it today and it seems to be pretty good, but there are a few yeast colonies still floating. Should I give it a little more time before bottling or am I good to go? Thanks in advance.

Cheers

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yankeedag wrote:

and get a hydrometer for your next batch ;) Welcome to the BeerBorg

...took the words right out of my mouth, Yankee.

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I still don't have a hydrometer, but I want to bottle my beer tonight.

It's my whispering wheat + mellow amber + orange + honey + coriander recipe.

It has been fermenting for 2 and a half weeks. I work during the week so tonight or tomorrow is a good time to bottle it. I sampled the beer a few days ago and it tasted good.

Tonight I looked at my Mr Beer handbook and it says that it is done fermenting when there are no "floating yeast colonies" on top and it's not cloudy.

I looked with a flashlight and there are white floaty things on top still in random spots. I am not sure if it is cloudy, but a few days ago it was sort of cloudy, but not much.

The "floating yeast colonies" comment in the Mr Beer book threw me off.
I had that mishap in the beginning in which I killed my yeast and had to add more, so I wonder if the extra yeast is the reason for the floating white stuff. I don't think it is foam.

Do you think my beer is ready to bottle?

I could wait another week if necessary but I thought 2 and a half weeks would be enough for my recipe.

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I'd bottle it. But that's me. My beers clear up in the bottle. Some wait longer and get less trub, but the trub doesn't bother me and I want to drink it sooner... LOL.

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I'll bet it's done. The common wisdom is one week per fermentable, but I don't think I've had to brew anything over two and a half weeks, as per my hydrometer. Also, as many say, if it tastes like beer (doesn't taste sweet or cidary), it should be ready to bottle. Hydrometers are pretty cheap really.

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Bottle it. After six months of really paying attention, using the hydrometer, and making insanely big beers with way more fermentables than you have, I have reached the point where almost everything is in the bottle by day 17. You are good to go almost without doubt.

David

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SiriusDG wrote:

Bottle it. After six months of really paying attention, using the hydrometer, and making insanely big beers with way more fermentables than you have, I have reached the point where almost everything is in the bottle by day 17. You are good to go almost without doubt.

David

Exactly. We've discussed the limits of the One Week per Fermentable rule at length. I've found that most of my 5 gallon batches brew even faster for some reason. Have you had the same experience?

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Well, sadly, I am not brewing 5 gal batches. But it seems logical...isn't the growth curve for rapidly reproducing yeast rather exponential? So as the amount of stuff your dealing with increases, the rate at which things happen should increase even faster, relative to a linear time scale.

OOOWWWW!!!! My head just exploded...I need a beer for the pain...

David

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SiriusDG wrote:

Well, sadly, I am not brewing 5 gal batches. But it seems logical...isn't the growth curve for rapidly reproducing yeast rather exponential? So as the amount of stuff your dealing with increases, the rate at which things happen should increase even faster, relative to a linear time scale.

OOOWWWW!!!! My head just exploded...I need a beer for the pain...

David


Yeah. Okay. You sold me. Fine. Sure.
You're asking me? My head explodes doing multiplication tables.

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Tomorrow will be 3 weeks for my VL + UME + honey fermenting at 72-75 and there is still a lot of bubbles on top. Why is it taking so long?You'd think it would go faster at higher temps. Should I wait for the bubbles to go away?

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I would expect that to be done by now. How many bubbles? 1/2 inch thick layer? More or less?
Here is where a hydrometer really comes in handy.

How does it taste? How does it look in the taste glass...is it actively fizzing, or very flat?

David

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SiriusDG wrote:

I would expect that to be done by now. How many bubbles? 1/2 inch thick layer? More or less?
Here is where a hydrometer really comes in handy.

How does it taste? How does it look in the taste glass...is it actively fizzing, or very flat?

David

Bubbles are 1/2 inch diameter, covering about 2/3 of the surface. Taste test is flat, not fizzy or sweet. Never had bubbles last this long before.

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I agree. Sounds like you might have a thicker brew, with is just keeping some foam on top, but it sounds done. Good news is thicker brew = better foam and lacing in the glass.

David

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Bubbles are 1/2 inch diameter, covering about 2/3 of the surface. Taste test is flat, not fizzy or sweet. Never had bubbles last this long before.

I'd like to see that keg. Beer still in the keg is still an untamed beast. But 1/2 inch bubbles? Gorsh! Expect something great!

'Tis beer, and fit for all. 3 weeks is puh-lenty of time...

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norman1 wrote:

SiriusDG wrote:

I would expect that to be done by now. How many bubbles? 1/2 inch thick layer? More or less?
Here is where a hydrometer really comes in handy.

How does it taste? How does it look in the taste glass...is it actively fizzing, or very flat?

David

Bubbles are 1/2 inch diameter, covering about 2/3 of the surface. Taste test is flat, not fizzy or sweet. Never had bubbles last this long before.

I agree it time to bottle your Mr Bubble.

BTW what is the barometer doing in norman1 land?

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Sham Addams wrote:

norman1 wrote:

SiriusDG wrote:

I would expect that to be done by now. How many bubbles? 1/2 inch thick layer? More or less?
Here is where a hydrometer really comes in handy.

How does it taste? How does it look in the taste glass...is it actively fizzing, or very flat?

David

Bubbles are 1/2 inch diameter, covering about 2/3 of the surface. Taste test is flat, not fizzy or sweet. Never had bubbles last this long before.

I agree it time to bottle your Mr Bubble.

BTW what is the barometer doing in norman1 land?


30.00 and rising. Jeez, got enough to think about without taking the barometer into consideration. Bottled this morning. The last bottle looked like a chocolate milk shake.

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norman1 wrote:

Sham Addams wrote:

norman1 wrote:

SiriusDG wrote:

I would expect that to be done by now. How many bubbles? 1/2 inch thick layer? More or less?
Here is where a hydrometer really comes in handy.

How does it taste? How does it look in the taste glass...is it actively fizzing, or very flat?

David

Bubbles are 1/2 inch diameter, covering about 2/3 of the surface. Taste test is flat, not fizzy or sweet. Never had bubbles last this long before.

I agree it time to bottle your Mr Bubble.

BTW what is the barometer doing in norman1 land?


30.00 and rising. Jeez, got enough to think about without taking the barometer into consideration. Bottled this morning. The last bottle looked like a chocolate milk shake.

Sorry, I dont mean to add to you mental baggage. I have been pondering something for a while about the barometric pressure in relation to brewing. Anyway your beer will be scrumptious.

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