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Best Advice/Tip From An Advanced Home Brewer

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Calling All Old Timers & Advanced Home Brewers. What's the best advice/tip you can give a newbie? Cheers. :drinking:
Mine is to follow the instructions closely on your first brews so you get a good, solid process going. This will become your routine on future brews. :cheers:

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Always be open and willing to learn. Brew with your heart and just relax, don't worry, have a home brew.

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Guest

Patience and sanitation, keep open mind when the BORG speaks.

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I know I am not a "master" or semi-master of the art, but my advice would be read up, learn, and accept "failures" (which I call lessons learned) brews and learn. LEARNING is the KEY to this hobby/obsession/conquest. :drinking:

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Research and never stop learning. The more you know, the better you brew.

Also, sanitize like you have obsessive-compulsive disorder. Always better to be safe than sorry.

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1. Don't let your reach exceed your grasp In other words, take it slow at first and brew the recipes as-is. You'll learn the flavor profiles of the ingredients more quickly, and you'll be getting comfortable with the process. Don't go all Mad Scientist until you're familiar with what you're doing and what you're working with.

2. Research Whatever form it takes, don't fly solo. Join a homebrew club. Read and collect brewing books. Become active in online brewing communities. Read blogs. Join AHA and get Zymurgy magazine on a regular basis. A lot of the "learning" has been done for you; it's there for the picking.

3. Accept your mistakes You're not going to brew perfectly every time. You may think you have a great idea for a beer recipe, or maybe you just wonder how something would turn out. Maybe you'll forget a step in the process, or have an accident or maybe life will just get in the way and you'll have a crummy batch or maybe even have to dump a batch. It happens. Move on. Babe Ruth is one of the all-time strikeout leaders, y'know.

4. Accept yourself for where you are There's nothing wrong with being new to homebrewing. Everyone had to start somewhere. You're reading about people doing partial mashes and grinding their own grains and whatnot, and here you are opening cans and stirring. It doesn't make you any less of a brewer.

And most important:

5. Relax. Don't worry. Have a homebrew Yes, we throw that phrase around pretty casually, but you know what? The underlying philosophy behind it, as explained by its originator, Charlie Papazian, is sound advice. Stressing and fretting over your beer doesn't improve anything, and may actually be counter-productive. It's certainly not going to do you any good. Whether you believe stress can negatively impact the beer itself (I believe it can), it's certainly going to negatively impact you. The beer knows what to do on its own. If you did everything you could to prepare it properly, it's best left alone to do its thing, which is very liberating. Beer should be something for relaxation, so take it easy. Check on it, but don't Mother Hen it too much. RDWHAHB.

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The best advice I can give is similar to Dave's #2

LEARN

In every way you can, learn. If you're going to homebrew - whether it be for fun, for competition, or for personal consumption - invest in learning. And I mean that as a wholly inclusive idea.

When you drink you're Miller Lite...think about what you're tasting. What about it does/does not work for you. When you drink a Old Rasputin...what do you pick-up.

Be receptive to learning, enjoy it and have fun with it.

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stop rushing to drink your beer. To many noobs sample to early and end up not staying with the hobby. Everyday someone posts why is my beer so sh1tty. Come to find out they are drinking it after 21 days 2 weeks in the LBK 1 week carb.

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+1 to everything above. i'm not a master either just a noob, since last dec. (though several have answered you already). i want to emphasize, time is your friend. for the rest of the world patience is a virtue, but in homebrewing it is a requirement. or as Dave pointed out rdwhahb.

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NEVER and I mean NEVER dump out your beer!! 99 out of 100 times it can be saved. I know that every once in a blue moon there is that batch that is completely FUBAR, but that the exception not the rule. Ask for help and try everything, because a homebrew is a terrible thing to waste!

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"k9dude" post=372694 said:

NEVER and I mean NEVER dump out your beer!! 99 out of 100 times it can be saved. I know that every once in a blue moon there is that batch that is completely FUBAR, but that the exception not the rule. Ask for help and try everything, because a homebrew is a terrible thing to waste!

+10000

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Always send a beer to Kealia for good luck with your next batch.

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"Kealia" post=372717 said:

Always send a beer to Kealia for good luck with your next batch.


so that's been my problem?

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Stay on this forum until next year and sign up for the recipe collaboration in 2014.

I promise you will learn how to make great beer.

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"Brewbirds" post=372745 said:

Stay on this forum until next year and sign up for the recipe collaboration in 2014.

I promise you will learn how to make great beer.

Maybe not even that long. There's usually one in the fall as well as the one in the spring.

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"Joechianti" post=372748 said:

"Brewbirds" post=372745 said:

Stay on this forum until next year and sign up for the recipe collaboration in 2014.

I promise you will learn how to make great beer.

Maybe not even that long. There's usually ne in the fall as well as the one in the spring.


OOOOOH I didn't know that. I can't wait to do it again.

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I would have to say focus on the yeast you're pitching, even more than the grains and adjuncts in the recipes. The marketing seems to talk endlessly about the recipes while barely mentioning a line or two about the yeast that ultimately will make or break your perfect recipe.

I say it all the time my under 6% alcohol beers are more than ready to drink after 4 weeks, but I also go out of my way to pitch a healthy starter in order to get a very aggressive fermentation going. I've been oxygenating my wort with pure o2 for over a year now and my beer's have never tasted cleaner.

Don't let life get in your way, brew beer, be happy!

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Patience, Sanitization, & SWMBO...You make SWMBO happy then you will be a happy successful HomeBrewer. Did I mention SANITIZATION? PATIENCE? SWMBO?

Happy Hoppy Brewing & Salud .

T8r out

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"Brewbirds" post=372752 said:

"Joechianti" post=372748 said:

"Brewbirds" post=372745 said:

Stay on this forum until next year and sign up for the recipe collaboration in 2014.

I promise you will learn how to make great beer.

Maybe not even that long. There's usually ne in the fall as well as the one in the spring.


OOOOOH I didn't know that. I can't wait to do it again.

Yeah, stay tuned. Probably be announced around Labor Day. I'm glad it's so popular!

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Keep researching.....the more you learn about the entire process and the different types of grains, hops and yeast the better your beer will be. And many have said this also....be patient. You can't rush a good thing!!

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Keep detail notes on all the beers you brew. Even keep notes of how the flavor of the beer changes week by week.

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T8r gave me the Patience, Sanitization, SWMBO post when I joined. From other posts I know about sanitizing and patience, but could not for the life of me figure out that SWMBO thing. Then I Googled it, and it made sense. And yes, SWMBO. If I didn't heed that one, I wouldn't be brewing and Borging today!

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If you do what everyone above said then you will make beer. That's what I can tell ya.

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I'd also add "Brew what you like."

Many times I've seen questions from new brewers asking, "Will this taste good?" and they present their idea. Unfortunately, what tastes good to me may not taste good to someone else. Sometimes experimentation and experience are the only ways to find out just what it is you do want to brew, and whether or not you're going to like it.

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++1000 You need to get burned!! There is not a human alive that ever listened to:
"Don't touch that it is hot!! You'll burn yourself!!"
"Don't stick that there you'll get a ........................??"

Ducking and Runnin' :woohoo: :woohoo: :woohoo:

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Don't ever, ever carry hot strike water in a cheap plastic pail with a flimsy metal wire handle unless you want a scolded foot. And yes it hurt like hell too.

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For me whether its a 2Gal Mr Beer batch or a 5Gal mini-mash or extract brew, the key has been sanitize, patience, water quality and.......

SANITIZE.

These for me have been the difference makers..Everything else is fixable or works itself out on its own with time.

I too fell into the trap of wanting to drink my beer as quick as I could when I first started which lead to poor results. Be patient. Beer gets better with time. While waiting, keep brewing and build your pipeline so you are NOT waiting as long going forward to drink good beer.
Also take notes on all your batches when possible. The older you get, the more you forget....ehh..what was I just saying?
Most of all..
ENJOY YOURSELF! This should NEVER feel like work!
:cheers:

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Pay attention and use a timer. My Breakwater Pale was well underway today when I got distracted and when the timer sounded, I grabbed the wrong bowl of hops ( I pre-measure) and threw it in. Aaaaargh! Not a critical mistake, but changing the hops schedule changes the result. This is my first time with this recipe and I wanted to do it straight up. I'm freelancing now, adding some more minor twists and taking notes.

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Alb, I usually pre-measure my hops only for the next addition, so this type of thing doesn't happen. It's a little fussier, since you have to stay on top of your hops schedule and timer, but this way I know I'm adding the right hops in the right amount at the right time.

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I pre-measure my hops and additions. I place them in small glass bowls. I then stack them according to when they are added. AS the time comes up, I just grab the next top full bowl.

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"yankeedag" post=375077 said:

I pre-measure my hops and additions. I place them in small glass bowls. I then stack them according to when they are added. AS the time comes up, I just grab the next top full bowl.

I do kind of the same thing. I pre-measure everything, have all the ingredients laid out ahead of time, then we do a kind of verbal walk through (since we are co brewers/ one has the notes and one is in the kitchen).

I use different size/shaped tea balls for my hops so I know which one to grab for which addition as planned.

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"yankeedag" post=375077 said:

I pre-measure my hops and additions. I place them in small glass bowls. I then stack them according to when they are added. AS the time comes up, I just grab the next top full bowl.

^This^. I find laying this all out while the wort is coming up to boil makes the additions easy.

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"yankeedag" post=375077 said:

I pre-measure my hops and additions. I place them in small glass bowls. I then stack them according to when they are added. AS the time comes up, I just grab the next top full bowl.

I find the 3 oz plastic dixie cups work perfectly for hops additions.
I'll measure out the quantity I need and use a sharpie to write the time on the side. They also can be washed and reused!

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