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Brew In A Bag Recipies / Tips

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I am starting the switch to All Grain. I have a 7.5 Gallon brew pot.

Naturally I am thinking of doing a BIAB for my first batch and my pot is too smal to do a 5 gallon batch.

I have been scouring the net looking for a decent library of BIAB recipes with little to no luck.

Curious to what peeps may suggest in terms of recipes and tips?

I have thought about halving some nice recipes I have found online but worry about accurate measurements. Not sure I can weigh out 0.13oz of hops lol

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I think you could do a BIAB 5gallon batch easy in a 7.5gallon pot.

What I would do is do the "Mash" part with grains and as much water as you can hold then rinse/sparge the grains to get the 5.5-6gallons water needed for boil.

If needed you could add a little water to top off the fermentor.

--- edit ---
I should add that I mean a "normal" beer which is 4.5-5% ABV using 8-10# grains

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Check through the rest of the threads in this section. Many have recipes for 2.5G BIAB batches.

losman26 posted his Gumball Head clone, I posted a simple pale ale recipe and there are many others.

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Any all-grain or partial mash recipe can be brewed using the BIAB method. There's no such thing as separate "BIAB" recipes. And as Trollby said - you can definitely do a 5 gallon batch in a 7.5 qt pot - you will just have to rinse/sparge to get the volume up.

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I have to totally agree with Trollby. You should be able to do a 5 gallon BIAB in a 7.5 gallon pot, if you would like to.

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there are some BIAB recipes @ Beersmith recipes I found them in one of the recipe paks.

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"Joechianti" post=373526 said:

I have to totally agree with Trollby. You should be able to do a 5 gallon BIAB in a 7.5 gallon pot, if you would like to.

I suppose that is my confusion. I initially thought the same but read in a few other forums you needed a bigger kettle.

I guess I'm confused on the whole rinse/sparge portion for BIAB. I thought the whole idea of BIAB was not having to involve this as you did everything in your pot???

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that is the no sparge method as with any form of brewing there is more than one way to dehusk barely :woohoo: :woohoo:

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"charlieb" post=373528 said:

"Joechianti" post=373526 said:

I have to totally agree with Trollby. You should be able to do a 5 gallon BIAB in a 7.5 gallon pot, if you would like to.

I suppose that is my confusion. I initially thought the same but read in a few other forums you needed a bigger kettle.

I guess I'm confused on the whole rinse/sparge portion for BIAB. I thought the whole idea of BIAB was not having to involve this as you did everything in your pot???

I look at it simply this way: you want to end up with 5 gallons of wort to go in your fermenter(s). Because of evaporation during the boil, you have to start out with maybe 6.5 to 7 gallons. As long as you don't boil at a crazy level, especially in the beginning, you can do it. Another trick you could use besides using less water in the boil and then topping off a little is to start with a little less and slowly add just to keep up with the evaporation loss.

You can do it.

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"haerbob3" post=373531 said:

that is the no sparge method as with any form of brewing there is more than one way to dehusk barely :woohoo: :woohoo:


"Barely dehusked"... sounds like a great name for a beer (or pr0n) :cheers:

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Just an FYI.....

When I sparge I get over 75% efficiency doing BIAB, without more like 70%.

Much better beers too.

I know it makes more steps and BIAB is suppose to be a "1 pot" method, I just like better efficiency

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"russki" post=373536 said:

"haerbob3" post=373531 said:

that is the no sparge method as with any form of brewing there is more than one way to dehusk barely :woohoo: :woohoo:


"Barely dehusked"... sounds like a great name for a beer (or pr0n) :cheers:

HOT D@MN!!
[attachment=13470]graphics-beer-737871_2013-05-20.gif[/attachment][attachment=13470]graphics-beer-737871_2013-05-20.gif[/attachment][attachment=13470]graphics-beer-737871_2013-05-20.gif[/attachment]

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"Trollby" post=373540 said:

Just an FYI.....

When I sparge I get over 75% efficiency doing BIAB, without more like 70%.

Much better beers too.

I know it makes more steps and BIAB is suppose to be a "1 pot" method, I just like better efficiency

But this could only be done with select recipes I suppose. For instance if my grain bill is 12lbs, there is no way to do that in a 7.5 gallon pot right?

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"charlieb" post=373542 said:

"Trollby" post=373540 said:

Just an FYI.....

When I sparge I get over 75% efficiency doing BIAB, without more like 70%.

Much better beers too.

I know it makes more steps and BIAB is suppose to be a "1 pot" method, I just like better efficiency

But this could only be done with select recipes I suppose. For instance if my grain bill is 12lbs, there is no way to do that in a 7.5 gallon pot right?


Why not? I've done up to 15 pounds of grain in my 7.5 gallon electric turkey fryer.

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"russki" post=373544 said:

"charlieb" post=373542 said:

"Trollby" post=373540 said:

Just an FYI.....

When I sparge I get over 75% efficiency doing BIAB, without more like 70%.

Much better beers too.

I know it makes more steps and BIAB is suppose to be a "1 pot" method, I just like better efficiency

But this could only be done with select recipes I suppose. For instance if my grain bill is 12lbs, there is no way to do that in a 7.5 gallon pot right?


Why not? I've done up to 15 pounds of grain in my 7.5 gallon electric turkey fryer.

Well that is what I have. A 7.5 turkey fryer. Wal-mart I suppose?

Anyways what about efficiency and all that sh@t? How are your batches coming out?

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"charlieb" post=373545 said:

"russki" post=373544 said:


Why not? I've done up to 15 pounds of grain in my 7.5 gallon electric turkey fryer.

Well that is what I have. A 7.5 turkey fryer. Wal-mart I suppose?

Anyways what about efficiency and all that sh@t? How are your batches coming out?


Here's a little pictorial I made way back when on my BIAB process - with up to 12 pounds of grain I routinely got 70-75% efficiency and really good beer.

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"russki" post=373547 said:

"charlieb" post=373545 said:

"russki" post=373544 said:


Why not? I've done up to 15 pounds of grain in my 7.5 gallon electric turkey fryer.

Well that is what I have. A 7.5 turkey fryer. Wal-mart I suppose?

Anyways what about efficiency and all that sh@t? How are your batches coming out?


Here's a little pictorial I made way back when on my BIAB process - with up to 12 pounds of grain I routinely got 70-75% efficiency and really good beer.

Holy crap you do this in an electric fryer? that is awesome!

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I have been wondering if we lost you Charlie; welcome back.

If you search this forum for "got a new brew toy" you will find a great little scale for hops.

When I got it they were on sale for around $10 w/ free shipping but that was a while ago.

It is a great little brewers assistant to have. (You can even use it measure diamonds when you're not brewing.) :laugh:

We have done some BIAB type batches with VERY small pots. We keep a second pot of water at 170F and use it to "sparge" which is really just placing the grain bag in a colander over the brew pot and rinsing it.

We also have to top off during the boil because of pot size.

It is hard to plug that into software because it is an unconventional method and our numbers are often off but we are making beer.

You just have to keep trying until you get a method down that works for your set up.

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"charlieb" post=373551 said:


There is a nice and simple recipe here that I'd like to try: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f66/centennial-blonde-simple-4-all-grain-5-10-gall-42841/


You have now been warned! Brewing this recipe will cause you to keep it in a bottle or on tap at all times.
It is that good.
I made 25 gallons of it last year and have already made 20 so far this year. It is a simple easy drinker that everyone likes.
BierMuncher has some great recipes.

The last time I brewed it was a 10 gallon batch in a 15 gallon pot using a 3 gallon sparge to get the pre boil volume.

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"charlieb" post=373551 said:

If that is the case Russki, could I do an entire BIAB with no sparge and just let 'er rip?

There is a nice and simple recipe here that I'd like to try: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f66/centennial-blonde-simple-4-all-grain-5-10-gall-42841/


I don't use that electric turkey fryer anymore since I've build my 15 gallon eBIAB rig (link in my signature if you're curious), but regardless of the grain bill, you still have to do a bit of sparging to get enough wort (6-6.5 gallons). The recipe you linked to is pretty good - I've got it on tap right now, and is easy to manage BIAB-style.

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"Brewbirds" post=373553 said:

I have been wondering if we lost you Charlie; welcome back.

If you search this forum for "got a new brew toy" you will find a great little scale for hops.

When I got it they were on sale for around $10 w/ free shipping but that was a while ago.

It is a great little brewers assistant to have. (You can even use it measure diamonds when you're not brewing.) :laugh:

We have done some BIAB type batches with VERY small pots. We keep a second pot of water at 170F and use it to "sparge" which is really just placing the grain bag in a colander over the brew pot and rinsing it.

We also have to top off during the boil because of pot size.

It is hard to plug that into software because it is an unconventional method and our numbers are often off but we are making beer.

You just have to keep trying until you get a method down that works for your set up.

Thanks Brewbirds!

I have a scale but clearly need something more precise :)

I suppose I will start with the simplest method for this. The recipe calls for 8.75lbs of grains. So I will mash with 3.5 gallons and sparge another 3 to give me 6.5.

Holler!

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"Inkleg" post=373554 said:

"charlieb" post=373551 said:


There is a nice and simple recipe here that I'd like to try: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f66/centennial-blonde-simple-4-all-grain-5-10-gall-42841/


You have now been warned! Brewing this recipe will cause you to keep it in a bottle or on tap at all times.
It is that good.
I made 25 gallons of it last year and have already made 20 so far this year. It is a simple easy drinker that everyone likes.
BierMuncher has some great recipes.

The last time I brewed it was a 10 gallon batch in a 15 gallon pot using a 3 gallon sparge to get the pre boil volume.

Lmao inkleg - this is the recipe I'm talking about :)

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"charlieb" post=373556 said:


I suppose I will start with the simplest method for this. The recipe calls for 8.75lbs of grains. So I will mash with 3.5 gallons and sparge another 3 to give me 6.5.

Holler!


What worked best for me was starting with 5 gallons of water, adding the grains, then sparging until I have enough volume. Don't forget that the grain will absorb some water. Also - don't be afraid to squeeze the bag - no reason to leave all that sugary wort in there. And no, you will not extract tannins.

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On it!

I'm dying to run down to the LHBS with all this brew talk.....

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"charlieb" post=373518 said:


I have been scouring the net looking for a decent library of BIAB recipes with little to no luck.

Here's a good BIAB resource. There are some good recipes as well: http://www.biabrewer.info/

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i've tried that centennial blonde, a la inkleg, it's so good i'm brewing it up sat as a ag bib. come on we'll jump on this train togeather

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"Jim Johnson" post=373563 said:

i've tried that centennial blonde, a la inkleg, it's so good i'm brewing it up sat as a ag bib. come on we'll jump on this train togeather

That's a deal brother :chug:

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"charlieb" post=373564 said:

"Jim Johnson" post=373563 said:

i've tried that centennial blonde, a la inkleg, it's so good i'm brewing it up sat as a ag bib. come on we'll jump on this train togeather

That's a deal brother :chug:

:banana: :banana: :banana: :banana:

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"christler" post=373600 said:

http://www.simplebiabcalculator.com/ here is a link that I use all the tome for biab. I also use a 7.5 gal turkey fritter. I normally do 2.5 or 4 and sometimes 3 gallon batches with my biab set up

That's awesome dude. Thanks!

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Let me get this sraight. If I get an all grain kit ,mash it in my boil pot (7.5) at the required temp and water volumn for the required time then remove the bag, place in a colonder and sparge until my desired full boil is reached and then go from there? Sorry for the long sentance

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"aces 2" post=373823 said:

Let me get this sraight. If I get an all grain kit ,mash it in my boil pot (7.5) at the required temp and water volumn for the required time then remove the bag, place in a colonder and sparge until my desired full boil is reached and then go from there? Sorry for the long sentance


Yep, that pretty much sums it up - as I said, 5 gallons of water seems to be a good starting point for this size pot. After pulling the grain bag, that will leave you with 3-4 gallons of "first runnings", and you make up the difference with sparge water. Just make sure your sparge water temperature is below 170F, so you do not extract tannins from the husks.

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HELLO all grain ! Thanks Russki for the advice. Time to move operations to the garage

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Not to sound like Columbo but I have "1 more question" Could I do the mash in a cooler to help hold temp better,then transfer the wort to the boil pot and do the sparge at that point? Thanks

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"aces 2" post=373853 said:

Not to sound like Columbo but I have "1 more question" Could I do the mash in a cooler to help hold temp better,then transfer the wort to the boil pot and do the sparge at that point? Thanks

yes

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"aces 2" post=373853 said:

Not to sound like Columbo but I have "1 more question" Could I do the mash in a cooler to help hold temp better,then transfer the wort to the boil pot and do the sparge at that point? Thanks


Or if your cooler is large enough to hold all of the water and the grain (as per the www.simplebiabcalculator.com), you can just do a no-sparge BIAB in that cooler.

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What I've always done with my BIAB is to use 1.25 qts per pound of grain and mash for 75 mins.
Then I usually do a dunk sparge, let the grain sit in 170F water for 10 mins , stirring it several times, then rinse the grain to my boil volume.
I also squeeze the bag to get every bit of the malty flavor out too! :chug:

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I brew exclusively BIAB in 2.5gal batches, and do mostly Old Ales and IIPA's. I have a 5 gal pot.

I use beersmith to get my volumes, but to do BIAB "truest" to form, you do not do a sparge at all. Basically, the amount of water you use is your final volume + boil-off + estimated losses to trub, chilling equip, etc (this is where beersmith would come in).

I raise my water to strike temp (about 7 degrees higher than mash for me) on my electric range (ceramic, no less!), preheat my oven to 190, dough in, kill the heat on the oven, cover the kettle and pop it in the oven for heat retention for 90 min. At then end of the mash, the pot goes back on the range, I raise the temp slowly (like I have a choice :laugh: ) to 168, kill the heat, and pull the grain bag. Then the pot goes outside to my propane burner (I use a Bayou Classic fish fryer burner I picked up for $50. For 2.5-5 gal volumes anything 60k BTU or higher should do you fine) and perform my boil there. Brew day is like anyone else's at that point.

If you want a recipe I just posted this if you want to do a 2.5 gal batch: Go Here

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"joejkd82" post=374465 said:

I brew exclusively BIAB in 2.5gal batches, and do mostly Old Ales and IIPA's. I have a 5 gal pot.

I use beersmith to get my volumes, but to do BIAB "truest" to form, you do not do a sparge at all. Basically, the amount of water you use is your final volume + boil-off + estimated losses to trub, chilling equip, etc (this is where beersmith would come in).

I raise my water to strike temp (about 7 degrees higher than mash for me) on my electric range (ceramic, no less!), preheat my oven to 190, dough in, kill the heat on the oven, cover the kettle and pop it in the oven for heat retention for 90 min. At then end of the mash, the pot goes back on the range, I raise the temp slowly (like I have a choice :laugh: ) to 168, kill the heat, and pull the grain bag. Then the pot goes outside to my propane burner (I use a Bayou Classic fish fryer burner I picked up for $50. For 2.5-5 gal volumes anything 60k BTU or higher should do you fine) and perform my boil there. Brew day is like anyone else's at that point.

Interesting.

Originally that is what I was going for. Everything in the "bag" no sparging.

I'm doing the centenial blonde everyone knows/talks about this weekend. I was debating on whether I would sparge or not with BIAB after posting this.

But right now I'm set not to. Everything in the bag and go..........

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"charlieb" post=374468 said:

"joejkd82" post=374465 said:

I brew exclusively BIAB in 2.5gal batches, and do mostly Old Ales and IIPA's. I have a 5 gal pot.

I use beersmith to get my volumes, but to do BIAB "truest" to form, you do not do a sparge at all. Basically, the amount of water you use is your final volume + boil-off + estimated losses to trub, chilling equip, etc (this is where beersmith would come in).

I raise my water to strike temp (about 7 degrees higher than mash for me) on my electric range (ceramic, no less!), preheat my oven to 190, dough in, kill the heat on the oven, cover the kettle and pop it in the oven for heat retention for 90 min. At then end of the mash, the pot goes back on the range, I raise the temp slowly (like I have a choice :laugh: ) to 168, kill the heat, and pull the grain bag. Then the pot goes outside to my propane burner (I use a Bayou Classic fish fryer burner I picked up for $50. For 2.5-5 gal volumes anything 60k BTU or higher should do you fine) and perform my boil there. Brew day is like anyone else's at that point.

Interesting.

Originally that is what I was going for. Everything in the "bag" no sparging.

I'm doing the centenial blonde everyone knows/talks about this weekend. I was debating on whether I would sparge or not with BIAB after posting this.

But right now I'm set not to. Everything in the bag and go..........

that's the way i'm doing it

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"Jim Johnson" post=374473 said:

"charlieb" post=374468 said:

"joejkd82" post=374465 said:

I brew exclusively BIAB in 2.5gal batches, and do mostly Old Ales and IIPA's. I have a 5 gal pot.

I use beersmith to get my volumes, but to do BIAB "truest" to form, you do not do a sparge at all. Basically, the amount of water you use is your final volume + boil-off + estimated losses to trub, chilling equip, etc (this is where beersmith would come in).

I raise my water to strike temp (about 7 degrees higher than mash for me) on my electric range (ceramic, no less!), preheat my oven to 190, dough in, kill the heat on the oven, cover the kettle and pop it in the oven for heat retention for 90 min. At then end of the mash, the pot goes back on the range, I raise the temp slowly (like I have a choice :laugh: ) to 168, kill the heat, and pull the grain bag. Then the pot goes outside to my propane burner (I use a Bayou Classic fish fryer burner I picked up for $50. For 2.5-5 gal volumes anything 60k BTU or higher should do you fine) and perform my boil there. Brew day is like anyone else's at that point.

Interesting.

Originally that is what I was going for. Everything in the "bag" no sparging.

I'm doing the centenial blonde everyone knows/talks about this weekend. I was debating on whether I would sparge or not with BIAB after posting this.

But right now I'm set not to. Everything in the bag and go..........

that's the way i'm doing it

Well Jim since we are compadre's this weekend I will let you know I will be doing one thing different this weekend. I will be using washed Wyeast 1056 instead of the nottingham from the recipe. Coincidentally this will also be my first attempt at using washed yeast.

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"charlieb" post=374475 said:

"Jim Johnson" post=374473 said:

"charlieb" post=374468 said:

"joejkd82" post=374465 said:

I brew exclusively BIAB in 2.5gal batches, and do mostly Old Ales and IIPA's. I have a 5 gal pot.

I use beersmith to get my volumes, but to do BIAB "truest" to form, you do not do a sparge at all. Basically, the amount of water you use is your final volume + boil-off + estimated losses to trub, chilling equip, etc (this is where beersmith would come in).

I raise my water to strike temp (about 7 degrees higher than mash for me) on my electric range (ceramic, no less!), preheat my oven to 190, dough in, kill the heat on the oven, cover the kettle and pop it in the oven for heat retention for 90 min. At then end of the mash, the pot goes back on the range, I raise the temp slowly (like I have a choice :laugh: ) to 168, kill the heat, and pull the grain bag. Then the pot goes outside to my propane burner (I use a Bayou Classic fish fryer burner I picked up for $50. For 2.5-5 gal volumes anything 60k BTU or higher should do you fine) and perform my boil there. Brew day is like anyone else's at that point.

Interesting.

Originally that is what I was going for. Everything in the "bag" no sparging.

I'm doing the centenial blonde everyone knows/talks about this weekend. I was debating on whether I would sparge or not with BIAB after posting this.

But right now I'm set not to. Everything in the bag and go..........

that's the way i'm doing it

Well Jim since we are compadre's this weekend I will let you know I will be doing one thing different this weekend. I will be using washed Wyeast 1056 instead of the nottingham from the recipe. Coincidentally this will also be my first attempt at using washed yeast.

washed yeast is my next batch. i saved 06 so i need a wheat.

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I don't think you'll be disappointed going no sparge. I routinely am in the 68-73% efficiency range. In fact my first ever AG batch was 68% efficiency brewing this way Just make sure you don't skip mash out, you need it to help get the sugars out since you won't be rinsing them.

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"charlieb" post=374475 said:

I will be using washed Wyeast 1056 instead of the nottingham from the recipe. Coincidentally this will also be my first attempt at using washed yeast.

Good luck with your first washed yeast. Soon it will become second nature.
I've made the Centennial with 05 and Notty. Both are good, but I prefer the notty.

JJ the Centennial that you enjoyed on the 4th on this month was brewed 3-30 and bottled 4-13. I was pouring what I kegged on 4-20. Thats how fast it goes from grain to glass.

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"Inkleg" post=374487 said:

"charlieb" post=374475 said:

I will be using washed Wyeast 1056 instead of the nottingham from the recipe. Coincidentally this will also be my first attempt at using washed yeast.

Good luck with your first washed yeast. Soon it will become second nature.
I've made the Centennial with 05 and Notty. Both are good, but I prefer the notty.

JJ the Centennial that you enjoyed on the 4th on this month was brewed 3-30 and bottled 4-13. I was pouring what I kegged on 4-20. Thats how fast it goes from grain to glass.

I have two batches, one using 05 and another using the Notty. I will harvest those.

Then I can compare the 1056 with them and see which I prefer.

Good times :gulp:

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"charlieb" post=374489 said:

"Inkleg" post=374487 said:

"charlieb" post=374475 said:

I will be using washed Wyeast 1056 instead of the nottingham from the recipe. Coincidentally this will also be my first attempt at using washed yeast.

Good luck with your first washed yeast. Soon it will become second nature.
I've made the Centennial with 05 and Notty. Both are good, but I prefer the notty.

JJ the Centennial that you enjoyed on the 4th on this month was brewed 3-30 and bottled 4-13. I was pouring what I kegged on 4-20. Thats how fast it goes from grain to glass.

I have two batches, one using 05 and another using the Notty. I will harvest those.

Then I can compare the 1056 with them and see which I prefer.

Good times :gulp:

i'm really limited by my lhbs and the next closest is atlanta. if i'm lucky a hour and a half (wouldn't count on it). in the small old fridge he has only one shelf in the door has yeast, dry only. i'm learning to wash so i can order the weihenstephaner weizen yeast, once. i love my wheats esp weizen and weissbier. :drinking:

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"Jim Johnson" post=374493 said:

"charlieb" post=374489 said:

"Inkleg" post=374487 said:

"charlieb" post=374475 said:

I will be using washed Wyeast 1056 instead of the nottingham from the recipe. Coincidentally this will also be my first attempt at using washed yeast.

Good luck with your first washed yeast. Soon it will become second nature.
I've made the Centennial with 05 and Notty. Both are good, but I prefer the notty.

JJ the Centennial that you enjoyed on the 4th on this month was brewed 3-30 and bottled 4-13. I was pouring what I kegged on 4-20. Thats how fast it goes from grain to glass.

I have two batches, one using 05 and another using the Notty. I will harvest those.

Then I can compare the 1056 with them and see which I prefer.

Good times :gulp:

i'm really limited by my lhbs and the next closest is atlanta. if i'm lucky a hour and a half (wouldn't count on it). in the small old fridge he has only one shelf in the door has yeast, dry only. i'm learning to wash so i can order the weihenstephaner weizen yeast, once. i love my wheats esp weizen and weissbier. :drinking:

Hey Jim check out Rite Brew . com

They work out to be the same price as going to my LHBS including shipping. Which is cheap.

They rock. They ship on time and everything comes as it should.

When I am lazy I order from them. They actually have more to choose from then my LHBS so it sometimes works out for me.

Side question, Are those your grandkids?

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"charlieb" post=374495 said:

"Jim Johnson" post=374493 said:

"charlieb" post=374489 said:

"Inkleg" post=374487 said:

"charlieb" post=374475 said:

I will be using washed Wyeast 1056 instead of the nottingham from the recipe. Coincidentally this will also be my first attempt at using washed yeast.

Good luck with your first washed yeast. Soon it will become second nature.
I've made the Centennial with 05 and Notty. Both are good, but I prefer the notty.

JJ the Centennial that you enjoyed on the 4th on this month was brewed 3-30 and bottled 4-13. I was pouring what I kegged on 4-20. Thats how fast it goes from grain to glass.

I have two batches, one using 05 and another using the Notty. I will harvest those.

Then I can compare the 1056 with them and see which I prefer.

Good times :gulp:

i'm really limited by my lhbs and the next closest is atlanta. if i'm lucky a hour and a half (wouldn't count on it). in the small old fridge he has only one shelf in the door has yeast, dry only. i'm learning to wash so i can order the weihenstephaner weizen yeast, once. i love my wheats esp weizen and weissbier. :drinking:

Hey Jim check out Rite Brew . com

They work out to be the same price as going to my LHBS including shipping. Which is cheap.

They rock. They ship on time and everything comes as it should.

When I am lazy I order from them. They actually have more to choose from then my LHBS so it sometimes works out for me.

Side question, Are those your grandkids?

thanks and yeah four grandsons the baby and the two biggest live in Ky, so we don't get to see them very often.

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Just brewed the Centennial...Looks like it will be a great one.
I switched it up just a bit for 5 gallons. Wanted a little more ABV. Went with and extra # of 2 row and 9.6 ozs of caramel malt, Vienna malt and carapils. Upped both Centennial hops additions at .33 oz instead of .25 to off set the additional grains. Also will be dry hopping .5 oz of centennial and maybe the cascades but not sure right now. Thanks for the link. I was looking for a solid tasty one to have for the summer!
http://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/centennial-blonde-75

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"dbark" post=375211 said:

Just brewed the Centennial...Looks like it will be a great one.
I switched it up just a bit for 5 gallons. Wanted a little more ABV. Went with and extra # of 2 row and 9.6 ozs of caramel malt, Vienna malt and carapils. Upped both Centennial hops additions at .33 oz instead of .25 to off set the additional grains. Also will be dry hopping .5 oz of centennial and maybe the cascades but not sure right now. Thanks for the link. I was looking for a solid tasty one to have for the summer!
http://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/centennial-blonde-75

I brewed mine on Saturday. Thought hard about making a few adjustments. But I have never followed a recipe exactly so I thought now was a good time to do so and not stray.

Next time I definitely will throw my own version into the mix.

If you dry hop I'd go with Cascade since it's great for that type of thing

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Just bottled this one yesterday. Hit 1.008 on FG using wyeast 1056. This is gonna be a good one just in time for the 4th. I also washed the 1056 and was my first time doing it. Very cool process. Wish I would've done it earlier in my brew "career" but had to start somewhere and the time was right. Brew on!

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I also used my first washed yeast on this one which is 1056.

My batch should be good in a couple of weeks. Not sure it makes it to the 4th :)

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i used my washed yeast with the last 2 batches. i'm gonna harvest the nottingham this time. if the centennial turns out half as good a the one inkleg turned me on to it'll become one of the "house beers". i also added 1 lb of 2 row just to help off set what i'll lose thru inefficiency. added 15 min to the mash time 75 min instead of 60 and lowered the amount of water by half from 1.5q per .5 lb to 1.5q per lb. i splarge and squeeze. beer smith says i'm shooting for a .048 i hit a .042

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I usually wrap a sleeping bag around my pot after raising the temp 7 degrees higher The temp seems to stay stable, almost too stable for that matter.

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Good idea, I use a blanket and it really works well. When the temps fall, I'll use the sleeping bag method.

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So I am trying to do this Centennial Blonde today as well and have run into a conundrum of sorts. Something happened to all my Centennial hops (could swear they were one of the 1 lb bags i had in freezer but apparently not).

As this is just an LBK sized batch it was only doing to be a total of .25 oz of Centennial (9.5AA) (.1/8 oz at 55 and 35 minutes). So - my question is regarding subbing out either :
Falconers Flight with 10.5 AA or some Columbus (but they are 15.5 and 17.0 on packs I have). I think the Falconers will be close flavor profile wise but since it is mostly for bitterness being at 55 and 35 should I take ANYTHING that is closer to the 9.5AA?

Thanks Borg
jeff

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I would go with Columbus since that is a listed substitue for Centenial.

Maybe just reduce the amount you would use?

You could plug this into beersmith and get a fairly good reading for how much.

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According to my charge, Amarillo, Cascade, Columbus, Summit are all substitutes for Centennial.

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Thanks Charlie - I was thinking along those lines also as it is such a light bodied beer and it is not supposed to be overwhelmingly bitter, that is what the IPAs are for :)

As the Columbus is about 60% more AA than the Centennial, I will just cut everything in half basically, well half plus a fraction whatever my scale will allow :) Cutting in half brings it to 19 or so bitterness in Qbrew - recipe calls for 21.5, so i figure my half plus a little "oops" will get me about where I need to be :)

Cheers all
jeff

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"Manowarfan1" post=380831 said:

Thanks Charlie - I was thinking along those lines also as it is such a light bodied beer and it is not supposed to be overwhelmingly bitter, that is what the IPAs are for :)

As the Columbus is about 60% more AA than the Centennial, I will just cut everything in half basically, well half plus a fraction whatever my scale will allow :) Cutting in half brings it to 19 or so bitterness in Qbrew - recipe calls for 21.5, so i figure my half plus a little "oops" will get me about where I need to be :)

Cheers all
jeff

I was using qBrew and thought people who kept pushing Beersmith were snobs lol.

But I saw a deal for it and picked it up. So glad I did. You can drag/adjust your desired bitterness and it will tell you how much hops to use.

Pretty awesome stuff.

I'm not saying go buy it, just wanted to share my very boring story :)

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Beersmith is prolly gonna be one of next beer related purchases. Gotta get some kind of fermentation unit going. It isnt even July out here in the new place yet and I am having to do the coolers with rotating frozen bottles of ice.

Gotta get a fridge and freezer, temp control etc - but all those are big purchases - maybe MrSmith gets put in on next order of ingredients :)

Oh - and I guess this one is now gonna have to be called Columbus Blonde - NOT as in that town where the Buckeyes play though (I think they may be one of the biggest obstacles to the Crimson Tide winning it all again this season).

Cheers
jeff

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Gotta do something to take my mind off the fact that using her pots pans and measuring stuff I accidentally have ended up with almost 14 quarts pre boil that has to get down to an LBK sized batch at the end of the boil - i am sensing a 30 minute boil before the hops even get added. I gotta get stuff done around here so i can get back to having a process like I did at my place.

Is it football season yet?

Cheers
jeff

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So I have two months to get garage emptied so that we can move everything from sun room into it - put down wood flooring, build a base for a granite bar top, clean and paint the aluminum siding (used to be the outside of the house before sunroom addition), get flat panels wired up then turn garage into mancave and brew room and run some hose from garage wall thru to sun room for taps, oh and get all the equipment that goes with it. Sure, no problem, I have time (no job) and it looks like I will pull some money from IRA to get buy until I am ready to go back to work. This could happen.

Anyone know if NFL Season Ticket is still exclusive to DirecTV? She doesnt have that and if I want to see the Broncos more than 5 or 6 times I am gonna need the season ticket. Also not sure what the college situation will be out here nowadays - even in Colorado I got to see Alabama every weekend but maybe one for tha past few years. I would imagine a lot of the local games will be ACC and or Big East (American Athletic?) in morning until SEC starts.

Not looking forward to the start times (and finish times) living out east now though - things start and finish so late. Grr. Oh well lots of things to keep me busy until at least we get to training camp for both college and pro :)

Columbus Blonde is boiling away and will hopefully turn out to be a nice back deck beer that we can have a few of without danger of being plastered :) I may have to try to make a sexier version and call it Tuscaloosa Blonde :laugh: or even Boulder Blonde in honor of the old home team (well besides Air Force which was ten minutes away) but their team has been in chaos the past couple of years.

Cheers
jeff

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Two months for all of that? Possible but you better start now.

NFL ticket is exclusive to Directv

You could always try Firstrowsports or XBMC.

You didn't hear it from me :)

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Using IRA means paying penalty and tax. Should be avoided if possible.

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Yeah short time left but it may not be so bad. I am not that handy - we will br bringing in handyman/experts for a lot of it and I will provide slave labor, learn, and keep the pace up. Garage is half empty - couple more runs to landfill should get it pretty close. Some stuff (juke box, pinball machine, maybe ping pong table) should go on craigslist and hoefully not need to be moved far or often. Once sun porch is emptied we will have someone come do the powerwash and use a sprayer most likely to paint (unless we end up taking down the siding and putting up drywall - not too excited about that just yet.maybe in the future) with carpet still in there, then after that is done just rip up carpet and go to town on the hardwood flooring which is already in the garage taking up space :) That will be a win/win as it will free up a lot of space in garage as well.

Once that is done I can start on garage in terms of organizing and placeing of a few things. I will be grabbing ideas from all the man cave and brew room stuff i have seen posted here :) Looks like if i end up with a 2.5 gallon batch, the Columbus Blonde will end up at or about 3.9-4.0% ABV, not to bad for a hot humid summer day in a couple of weeks if it tastes good.

Cheers
jeff

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2 months is super ambitious but if you get pros working on it it's certainly doable if they've got time open.

I'm clearing out my basement where my keezer currently is. No bar or anything going in but my house is 90 years old and the basement was stone/rubble that was concreted over. Basically it needs patching/waterproofing, so that means getting real familiar with some hydraulic cement, drylock, and interlocking floor tiles.

Be interested to hear how your Columbus blonde turns out. I've seen it listed that Columbus is a substitute for Centennial, but I think they taste nothing alike.

However, Columbus is probably my favorite hop

I've also seen that a more accurate proxy for Centennial is a roughly 60/40 cascade/Columbus blend. I believe the centennial blonde recipe has late cascade additions, so you should be good to go, though I think you'll end up with a bit more pine (yum!) with that 35min addition being there and this being a small beer.

Should be tasty brew.

Did you go BIAB? What did you mash at? I'm always looking at good ideas to make my BIAB process even easier or more efficient.

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"joejkd82" post=380922 said:

2 months is super ambitious but if you get pros working on it it's certainly doable if they've got time open.

I'm clearing out my basement where my keezer currently is. No bar or anything going in but my house is 90 years old and the basement was stone/rubble that was concreted over. Basically it needs patching/waterproofing, so that means getting real familiar with some hydraulic cement, drylock, and interlocking floor tiles.

Be interested to hear how your Columbus blonde turns out. I've seen it listed that Columbus is a substitute for Centennial, but I think they taste nothing alike.

However, Columbus is probably my favorite hop

I've also seen that a more accurate proxy for Centennial is a roughly 60/40 cascade/Columbus blend. I believe the centennial blonde recipe has late cascade additions, so you should be good to go, though I think you'll end up with a bit more pine (yum!) with that 35min addition being there and this being a small beer.

Should be tasty brew.

Did you go BIAB? What did you mash at? I'm always looking at good ideas to make my BIAB process even easier or more efficient.

Not that it matters Joe as this was my first official BIAB batch but I figured I'd chime in.

I mashed at 150-155 for 60.

Then set the bag in a colander and let it drain. No sparging.

I'm certain I would be more efficient by sparging and whatever. But I'm trying to simplify my process. I'm aiming for consistency over efficiency. I can adjust my grain bill or mash longer accordingly to make-up for lost efficiency on recipes. People may say that is stupid but oh well.

My efficiency was a bit low on this one so next time I will mash a bit longer and see how that works out.

Probably nothing new here for you but just in case :)

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"charlieb" post=380933 said:

I'm certain I would be more efficient by sparging and whatever. But I'm trying to simplify my process. I'm aiming for consistency over efficiency. I can adjust my grain bill or mash longer accordingly to make-up for lost efficiency on recipes. People may say that is stupid but oh well.

I have always added an extra pound of either base malt or carapils to all my BIAB recipes that I don't list in BeerSmith. So call me stupid also.

Sometimes I sparge, sometimes not, sometimes I mash out at 168, sometimes not, sometimes I remember to stir every 15 minutes, sometimes not. Not stirrng seems to be the most consistance if I miss my numbers, but the extra pound on grain is always in there.

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"charlieb" post=380933 said:

Then set the bag in a colander and let it drain. No sparging.

I'm certain I would be more efficient by sparging and whatever. But I'm trying to simplify my process. I'm aiming for consistency over efficiency. I can adjust my grain bill or mash longer accordingly to make-up for lost efficiency on recipes. People may say that is stupid but oh well.

My efficiency was a bit low on this one so next time I will mash a bit longer and see how that works out.

Probably nothing new here for you but just in case :)


Don't be afraid to squeeze the bag. There's a lot of sugary wort trapped in there. But generally, I also don't sweat it when it comes to efficiency. You just need to figure out what yours is and adjust your recipes accordingly.

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I actually squeezed the shit out of my bag lol. It was a little hot though......

Maybe that is why my OG was a bit higher than Beersmith spit out. Who knows

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"charlieb" post=381018 said:

I actually squeezed the shit out of my bag lol. It was a little hot though......

Either some beer brewing gloves or turkey frying gloves from the hardware store works wonders, I have both.
Squeeze like a mad man and no burnt hands.

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i pull mine out but i can't find a colander that'll hold 10 lbs of grain. where y'all gettin these monsters? i use the top ,the slotted part, of a broiler (see below). sqeeze, splarge & squeeze again. i just put a jersy work glove in a rubber(playtex) glove. still gets warm, but not uncomfrotably so.


[attachment=13913]broiler.jpg[/attachment]

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Jim, see if you have a restaurant supply store near you. Mines big enough to hold 20 lbs of wet grain.

Another way is to drill a sh*t load of holes in the bottom a 5 gallon bucket. Set it in another bucket, put grain sack in, let drain, squeeze and pour catch bucket wort back into your boil pot.

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I'm kinda liking the 5 gallon bucket idea. My colander works fine but me thinks I rather go the bucket route.

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On HBT some use a dunk sparge in cold or hot water. Seems to work well. I used a pour sparge both times, but I think volume control is easier with dunking.

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