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CaptainBeer

Is it ok to ferment the LBK on end?

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New to these forums (but not internet forums in general) so I TRIED to search for my answer, I swear I did!

Is it ok to ferment with my LBK standing up on end? I have a food grade bucket at home I would like to put it in to use as a swamper, rather than buying another device.

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Short answer...no.

The lid of the fermenter has slots in it designed to allow air out during fermentation so there is no build up of CO2 inside the LBK. Those same slots will leak liquid if the LBK is turned upside down or on its end.

EDIT: Sorry, its not the lid itself that has the slots, its the LBK where the lid screws on, but the answer remains the same...do not ferment on its end.

Unless, of course, the batch is small enough that the liquid doesn't reach the lid, but that wouldn't be very much beer...maybe a gallon?

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Thank you both for your responses, it is much appreciated.

Second question, since I will be fermenting in a shallow plastic container (probably similar to a plastic storage bin, converted to a 'swamper'), won't my tap get contaminated by the water it is sitting in? Or is this something I should not be overly concerned about?

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Use a Q-Tip to sanitize the inside of the spigot, and then cover it with a plastic sandwich bag held on with a rubber band. Not a seal as watertight as a frog's ass, but it should do the job.

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OR waitforit: use a 48 quart Igloo cooler...fricking works awesomeness for my swampers and I have 4 of them!!!
[attachment=13587]IglooCooler34L.jpg[/attachment]

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center CaptainBeer. You will be assimilated. Resistance is Quite Futile: We have Beer.

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Thanks for the warm welcome all. I've brewed many times (at a micro brewery) but have never done it at home. Mostly, I lack the space for both brewing and storage for fermenting. Mr. Beer is a great compromise. Looking forward to my first attempt. (I'm doing a Santa Catalina IPA.)

I pulled the trigger and ordered a 48 Qt. Cooler as someone recommended. My place is HOT, so I know I'll need to work to keep my beer COOL. My place stays a consistent 75-80 9 months out of the year. I've been testing temps of standing water and it stays JUST below 76. (I use a thermometer with an alarm.)

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You need to get cooler than 76. You'll find people use soda or milk jugs full of water that they freeze and then put in the cooler with the LBK (no need for water) and rotate them every 12 - 24 hours. 76 means at peak fermentation you'll be over 80 and that's not going to work. Ideally, you want to be around 68 (or lower) so the peak is 76 or lower.

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So to clarify:

Does my liquid need to be 76 or cooler, or the air temp? The liquids elsewhere in my home stay below 76 very consistently when tested. (I have a jug of water where I'll be fermenting with a termometer in it for the last several days, it's never gone over 75.)

I think I get it now: it's going to heat itself up when it starts to ferment, correct? Making it harder to keep cool.

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Air temp is irrelevant, liquid matters.

Yes it ferments higher.

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once the fermentation kicks in, the temp of the wort can jump up as high as 10*F over ambient. So, you may have to regulate that with a few or singular frozen water bottle.

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I use the cooler as well. I place a cookie sheet in the bottom and put LBK on it in case of a volcano like fermentation. Throw a frozen water bottle in and put a piece of cardboard over it. keeps me at 60 to 62 and I change out the bottle once a day. Pretty simple really.

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Thanks again for all the great responses. This is one of the more helpful forums I've ever interacted with, to say the least!

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Yeah, we're all about the beer here, and we pretty much check our egos at the door.

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I'm kind of bummed. I won't be able to start the process until July. I'm out of town the 3rd and 4th weekend in June and 1st and 2nd weekend in July.

I do have another question though, which I believe i have the answer to already as well:
If I am understanding the Mr. Beer directions online correctly, it says once I bottle and add yeast I can immediately refrigerate the bottles. My understanding is that they should still be at the 68-74 temp to allow the yeast to 'eat' the sugar and turn to alcohol. If I am understanding the directions correctly I can either put the beer in the fridge or do it closer to room temp.

EDIT:
I re-read the directions, I completely misunderstood them the first time. I should definitely NOT put them in the fridge at that time.

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First, you bottle with sugar, not yeast. Second, you keep them at room temp for 4 weeks. Do not refrigerate.

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You are correct, I meant sugar. Is it safe to brew using a non-stick pot? Want to make sure I don't contaminate my batch, but don't want to run out and buy a new pot.

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Welcome aboard The Obsession CaptainBeer! If you're like the rest of us here you'll soon be awash in a sea of beer and setting sail on many great brewing adventures. There's lot's of information here and plenty of hands to help you get under way. You'll soon be producing some memorable beers and having a lot of fun too in the days ahead.

Navigate on over to our Advanced Brewing Techniques area of the forum and read over the

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417" target="_blank" title="http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417">'4 Things Every Brewer Should Know About Yeast'

sticky. Yeast is a living cell, keep them healthy and they'll ferment you up some awesome tasting beers.

Set your course and sail on over to our New Brewers and FAQs area of the forum and read over the 'Malt To Adjunct Ratios' sticky.

Remember for the best tasting beer you'll want no less than 80% of the alcohol to come from malts and no more than 20% of the alcohol to come from sugars or other adjuncts.

Give your beer at least 2-3 weeks to ferment and another 3-4 weeks to carbonate and condition before refrigerating. I know it's going to be hard to resist popping them open sooner, but like with anything homebrewing it'll be worth the wait.

When using any priming calculator enter the warmest temperature that your fermenting beer has endured between the time you pitched your yeast until bottling day. This has to do with the beer's residual level of Co2, or the ability for beer to absorb Co2 into solution during fermentation. For a typical Ale fermenting around 70F the residual Co2 will be around .83 volumes, which is then subtracted from whatever Co2 level you entered as your target.


Example 1: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 70F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 2: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 60F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 3: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 80F - Enter 80F for the temperature

Higher levels of Co2 will stay in solution when the beer is colder, as the beer warms up more Co2 will be released from solution. Hope that helps.

This is my glass of beer. There are many like it, but this one is mine. Without me my beer is useless. Without my beer, I am useless. ~ Screwy Brewer

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Went ahead and pulled the trigger last night. Made a batch of Santa Catalina Pale Ale. Seems to be keeping a pretty low temp so far (mid 60's) which is surprising because my house is HOT (rarely below 75).

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If you follow the Mr. Beer instructions, you end up with things around the low to mid 60s to start, as the refrigerated water brings it down. It takes a few days for the temps to climb up (or drop) for 2.13 gallons, plus the yeast has to kick in. Assuming you have a stick on thermometer against the liquid of the LBK, I suspect that come tomorrow morning you'll see low 70s.

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Yeah, I have a stick on thermometer (from another home brewing supply website). It crept up about 1-2 degrees last night. Glad to hear I'm within 'normal' range so far. Can't wait to check it tonight after work!

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FYI, if you can keep it below 70* whilst the yeasties are working you will have less of a chance of getting any off-flavors in the batch. We suggest a cooler with a couple of frozen water bottles in the cooler and change them out every 8-12 hours or as needed...a 48 quart igloo is what I use and 64 oz juice bottles work great as they are a thicker plastic than like a milk jug plastic. I have my coolers in my brew closet and they are running 62-64* now that high temp ferming is done...and the yeasties are just cleaning up after themselves.

Good luck and keep us informed

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T8r: about how soon should I try to (slowly) drop the temp? I have my brew in a cooler and a bunch of bottles frozen and ready to go!

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After 3 weeks, I have finally bottled the beer. I tried a sample and was very impressed. If it comes out half as good as the non-carbonated sample, I'll be thrilled. Waiting for some hops in the mail and I'm starting on my Czech Pils. I've got a ton of 22oz bottles from years ago, so I can keep bottling.

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