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twyjad

ABV

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How can I make my beer stronger? Add more sure, or will that cause to much carbonation.

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Welcome, you will find answers to all your questions here. The people on this form are the best. I do not recommend chasing ABV. But if you want you can add DME / LME. Mr beer sells a booster pack that works well or you can add honey. The down side is it will dry your beer out. And the conditioning time of the beer will increase. I would recommend if your looking for stronger beer buy kits with higher ABV ratings that way you know what your getting.

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The ingredients in the wort will not affect carbonation. Only the addition of sugars at bottling will affect carbonation. I would recommend (in order of preference) adding some malt extract (either liquid or dry... both available at any online or local LBS or thru Mr. Beer) to add more ABV. Booster will work if used in limited amounts. Honey and sugar will add to ABV as well, but the product will suffer.

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there is a Malt to adjunct ratio that we try to maintain to prevent cidery effects. if you have more than a 2:1 ratio (2 parts malt, 1 part adjuncts [read sugar]), the beer may develope a cidery taste and take a long time to "mellow" out. If you want a mind numbing ABV, go with more malt. Now, if you add more malt, you'll need to add more hops. and the cycle continues.
:borg:

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First like the others have said chasing ABV is a good way to have less than ideal beers.

Basically to increase the ABV you need to increase the sugars. LME/DME is your best option for doing so. But you have to be careful as you increase the malt in the beer you will have more residual sugars so the beer will seem sweeter. Which may then need to be countered with the addition of hops.

If you want to start getting into bigger beers I would recommend starting with recipes that other people have created. Take a look at them and see what they have done and try to figure out why they did it. You can then start messing with your own recipes.

If you want sour beers I am not the best to answer the question but the people I know that make sour beers only use glass. The bacteria and wild yeasts that are used in sour beers can hang around in plastic containers and affect later batches. Some people say it's OK if you mark the equipment as your sour equipment and only use it for sours. Others like to have a lot more control of the blend of souring compounds so they use glass and add their own infectious agents.

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using honey would be a waste of money nothing is really gained from it. Chase the flavor my friend and the ABV will come. Not having the ABV overpower the beer is a very delicate balancing act. Download QBrew and the MR DB and you will see how changing one thing effects everything else. Also use DME or LME to increase it. Also try and stay around 10% when adding anything else. How about a couple of shots of whiskey

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How can I make my beer stronger? Add more sure, or will that cause to much carbonation.

I would suggest you have it lift weights! As the others have indicated, chase flavor, not ABV. Since you did not indicate which brew you wanted to make, it is hard to make suggestions as to how to improve it or add to it. If what you want to do is simply get drunk - make your brew and drink boiler makers (i.e., down a shot of whiskey with the brew).

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Chase flavor, not ABV. Ya want a strong drink, buy a jug of whiskey. Higher ABV comes with experience, shooting for it as a beginner will only lead to dissapointment and bottles full of liquid horse shyte. YES, I'm speaking from personal experience.... :blush:

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No offense intended, especially since you're not the first new brewer to ask this question. But every time I see this brought up, I'm put in mind of the teenager who's just got his driver's license, and can barely parallel park properly, much less drive on an interstate with dozens of other vehicles, yet he thinks he's ready for Formula I racing.

Start slow.

Learn the process.

Read.

Grow into it.

You'll make higher ABV beers eventually, if that's what you want. But that's not all there is to brewing your own beer. In fact, that's the least thing about homebrewing.

The most important thing is making good beer. Whatever the alcohol content, good beer trumps everything.

If all you want is a buzz, there are faster, easier, and cheaper ways to do it.

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just brew the kits straight for the first few. do the reads i found http://howtobrew.com/ and the borg very useful in deciding where i wanted to go with my brewing. now the borg is helping me to get there.

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"twyjad" post=377197 said:

Good beer is my ultimate goal. What do u suggest?

After doing up 3-4 simple kits, look at MrBs recipes. Some of them take a few more steps to steep grains, hops, etc. Do up a few of those, then start experimenting on some of the kits with added DME, added hops, more grains, etc. Alot of us went this route, then started ordering the bigger 5 gallon kits from other suppliers, some of them simple (mostly malts) up to all grain. I guess what I'm trying to say, take baby steps, learn each process and grow with the hobby. Jumping in over your head without a good basic understanding will have u dissapointed/let down and that's where ppl stop brewing. Good luck.

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A very simple way to add ABV and flavor is take the standard can of hopped malt extract, and add a $3.50 liquid malt pack from Mr Beer. It will make the beer about 4.5-5% and be balanced. Easy Peasy.

Monty

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"twyjad" post=377226 said:

Is it more expensive to brew? Or buy already made in store?

It can be. I have started doing all grain, stepping away from recipe kits. While I can brew 5 gallons of awesome beer of 5 or 6% ABV for equal or close to the price of a MrB kit, the equipment is what gets you up there in $$. Yes, it is a little more expensive than buying commercial swill, but my beer is soo much better than most beer u can buy, and this is why we brew, for great tasting beer of our own. Most here start with the kits and buy a piece of bigger brewing equipment one at a time so it's not a huge hit all at once on the ol pocket.

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so far buying from the lhbs, and counting equipment i've bought. not paying myself(beer is my reward) i've still been only paying an average of $.80 a beer. using dme, hops and partial mashes to make beer, no kits(cheaper that way).

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"twyjad" post=377226 said:

Is it more expensive to brew? Or buy already made in store?

If you're just talking about ingredients, it can ultimately be less expensive to brew all-grain. If you're talking about equipment, that's an added cost at the start, which then gets amortized into the cost of each subsequent batch.

But I went to my LHBS this past weekend and spent around $40 buying ingredients for two LBK batches. The numbers aren't hard numbers, because I bought one small piece of equipment (around $4), I'll be splitting some of the grain up and saving the rest for other batches, and I had some grain at home that I didn't have to buy, but let's say I spent around $40 for two batches. That's four cases of beer, roughly calculated. That's around 80 cents a bottle. I wouldn't want to drink store-bought beer at 80 cents a bottle, especially when I know mine is going to taste better.

The main thing about this hobby is the process. If you want your beer good, and you're willing to wait, you'll get good beer. If you want your beer quick, there are much quicker ways to get beer, since it's sold all over the place. And some of it is darn good, when you can find a quality craft beer.

Hobbies take time and cost money. Homebrewing is no different.

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"twyjad" post=377226 said:

Is it more expensive to brew? Or buy already made in store?

Meh...while some of the other guys are spending about $0.80...I'm probably closer to $1.25-$1.30 per beer.

When I look at a beer I really enjoy...Svyturys Ekstra Draught...it sells for $9.49 per 4 pack. Roughly $2.37 per bottle.

Even if I put a little more love into my beer I still probably wouldn't spend more than $1.50 or so per beer.

==

If you talk about the average Budweiser it's roughly $16.50 per case where I live. Roughly 68 or 69 cents per bottle. Cost-wise, it's more expensive to brew...BUT...I'm brewing brewing from the heart and from my taste buds...not my walet. I really, really want to savor and enjoy my drinking indulgence.

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I brew what I want how I want it. That is something I cannot get at any store or brewpub. That is something you can not put a cost on!!

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I'm at $.59 per bottle for ingredients only, mostly Mr. Beer but the last two bulk extract, steeped grains and hops. Those two batches are in the same range, basically doing 5 gallons for $28 - $32 or $.53 - $.60 per bottle.

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