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Alapai K

Beer tastes like apple juice. What went wrong???

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I just cracked open a bottle of my first classic american light. Tastes a lot like apple juice. I let it frement in the Keg for 14 days, bottled at room temp for 14 days and fridge for 7 days. Not sure what happened. Please help!!!!

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You need more room temp conditioning time. Take them back out of the fridge, then give them at least another 2 weeks at room temp. As a newbie, I did the exact same thing, followed this advice given to me on these forums, and it was SOOOOO much better.

Patience young grasshopper!

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Regardless of what the Mr. Beer instructors say, it really needs to sit in the bottles at room temperature for a minimum of 4 weeks. You'd be surprised how much that cidery taste conditions out with extra conditioning.

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I have most of the bottles still conditioning at room temp. its been 3 weeks now so one more week then good? thanks for all the help. how long do you typicaly chill the beer before drinking?

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Borg folks often recommend a conditioning test on a first batch... try one bottle each week to taste how time improves beer. My first batch was also CAL, cidery taste disappeared after 8 weeks conditioning. Just had one at 11 weeks and it is much improved! Lest the yeasties do their thing for a while, and put more to work in a new batch of something interesting while you get a pipeline built up. They tell me a full pipeline makes the waiting easier!

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I agree with the above statements. The CAL came out cidery for a lot of us until we let it sit and condition. My notes say that mine was pretty good at 6 or 7 weeks in the bottles.

As for how long to chill, you can chill 24 hours and pour it into a glass carefully (avoid pouring the sediment from the bottom of the bottle). If you can chill 2 or 3 days the sediment will stay put much better and make it easier to pour without getting that stuff in your glass.

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Yup just needs more time.
To lower the conditioning time needed in the future do everything you can to ensure a healthy fermentation, and keep your adjunct (booster or sugar) to malt ratio under 1/3.

You can find tons of information here on how to ensure a healthy fermentation, but mainly it's:
Pitch enough yeast.
Control the fermentation temperature.

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I sold one of my CALs for this very reason. Not my favorite type of beer, and I've seen few positive reviews.

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Although this really isnt a "big" beer, you should also consider leaving it in the keg for 3 weeks before bottling if you do not have a hydrometer. I speak generically as have not yet tried the CAL yet.

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That's good advice though, Yooper. No hydro = 3 weeks. Then 4 weeks warm conditioning.

You can make great beer in 49 days.

You can make not so great beer in 14 days.

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"Alapai K" post=376848 said:

how long do you typicaly chill the beer before drinking?

24 - 48 hours.

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"whynot" post=376853 said:

Borg folks often recommend a conditioning test on a first batch... try one bottle each week to taste how time improves beer. My first batch was also CAL, cidery taste disappeared after 8 weeks conditioning. Just had one at 11 weeks and it is much improved! Lest the yeasties do their thing for a while, and put more to work in a new batch of something interesting while you get a pipeline built up. They tell me a full pipeline makes the waiting easier!

8 weeks for me too, it turned into a really nice brew once that cidery flavour dissapeared. Odly enough I find all my Mr. B yeasted brews get that taste and it takes a while for it to fade, although the hoppier brews hide it somewhat. Maybe my basement is too cool, 60-64F. I overheated one batch with a broken heater and the cider taste was much less noticeable.

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temp is perfect. A lot of the twang comes form the extract itself. There are more complex sugars in extract than in an all grain wort. These sugars need extra time to condition than the simple sugars that are fermented immediately.

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@haerbob3, current Mr. Beer extracts are not twangy at all compared to the old ones. Instead they are "Pride of Ringwoody" which is a different animal.

@Brewbs, the downunda yeast really doesn't like it in the lower 60s. Everything I've used it 65+ degrees has conditioned fast and been good to drink soon. Everything I've used it at 62 or

I'm absolutely certain it's the yeast/temps because I did a 4 gallon split batch with Nottingham and downunda @60, and the Nottingham was great at 3 weeks, and the DownUnda was apple city for 12 weeks.

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"mashani" post=377508 said:

@haerbob3, current Mr. Beer extracts are not twangy at all compared to the old ones. Instead they are "Pride of Ringwoody" which is a different animal.

@Brewbs, the downunda yeast really doesn't like it in the lower 60s. Everything I've used it 65+ degrees has conditioned fast and been good to drink soon. Everything I've used it at 62 or

I'm absolutely certain it's the yeast/temps because I did a 4 gallon split batch with Nottingham and downunda @60, and the Nottingham was great at 3 weeks, and the DownUnda was apple city for 12 weeks.


+1 to Mashani's reply. BAM!

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"Wings_Fan_In_KC" post=377595 said:

"mashani" post=377508 said:

@haerbob3, current Mr. Beer extracts are not twangy at all compared to the old ones. Instead they are "Pride of Ringwoody" which is a different animal.

@Brewbs, the downunda yeast really doesn't like it in the lower 60s. Everything I've used it 65+ degrees has conditioned fast and been good to drink soon. Everything I've used it at 62 or

I'm absolutely certain it's the yeast/temps because I did a 4 gallon split batch with Nottingham and downunda @60, and the Nottingham was great at 3 weeks, and the DownUnda was apple city for 12 weeks.


+1 to Mashani's reply. BAM!

If you 2 are right then I have to rethink my system.

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"mashani" post=377508 said:


@Brewbs, the downunda yeast really doesn't like it in the lower 60s. Everything I've used it 65+ degrees has conditioned fast and been good to drink soon. Everything I've used it at 62 or

I condition upstairs in a warmer closet, however I can say for a fact that no matter how much Coopers yeast and Mr. Beer yeast look alike I do not get the same results with the Coopers or US-05, only Mr. Beer yeast has this tendency. I wish I could find a good spot on the main floor of my house to try a batch, I thought for sure with the recent heat blast my basement would be closer to 70 but it hasn't budged since mid winter. Maybe I'll just put it up high on shelf in the basement and see how it turns out.

I recently made a batch of Patriot with extra LME and .5oz of Liberty and the cideriness is very evident after 4 weeks conditioning, I've accepted the fact that it will be a few more weeks.

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"mashani" post=377508 said:

@haerbob3, current Mr. Beer extracts are not twangy at all compared to the old ones. Instead they are "Pride of Ringwoody" which is a different animal.

In this case I was not referring to an "extract twang", believe it or not! What I was pointing out is that the longer fermentable sugar chains need more time to ferment and condition out. I do understand that MR B extracts are now done using cold vacuum evaporation to condense the extract, the same method employed by the wine industry The fact that the amount of reduction needed for packaging cause these sugar chains to be more prevalent, thus requiring more time.

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