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Monsteroyd

Boiling wort on a turkey fryer in the basement

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Hey, I'm not saying I'm gonna do it, but what are the dangers of boiling the wort on a turkey fryer in the basement. Let's say with an open window next to it. Would it be any worse than using a gas stove to boil the water / wort.

Thanks in Advance
Monty

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It will be sitting next to a window and the last time i installed a gas stove there was only a gas and elec connection, no vent.

Monty

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Really bad idea to run a big propane burner in your basement. Carbon monoxide poisoning.

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"FedoraDave" post=377468 said:

I think that's a kind of sketchy idea. Carbon monoxide is not to be trifled with.


If ventilated properly (basement windows open), I think you'd be okay - most likely. I have seen it done in basements on youtube (Chris Knight is one example). But Dave's use of the word "sketchy" is spot-on, IMO.

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Do you have a hook up to gas outside the house? I'm sure bringing a 20 lb propane tank inside would be an issue. I believe that is not recommended.

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my gas stove is not vented but that fryer produces way more heat and monoxide than a stove. inside could be a deadly experiment. opening a window will not be enough even a fan won't move enough air to make it safe. beer's not worth the risk, brew outside.

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I have all 4 gas burners going full open on brew days, with a window fan in the basement window and it is no problem at all. Think of this who do you know opens the kitchen windows when boiling water or baking? At times for cross ventilation one window fan pulls outside air in while another window fan exhausts to the outside.

Like the others said though, no way I`m lighting a propane burner in my basement.

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Like the others said though, no way I`m lighting a propane burner in my basement.

I agree 100%

let me ask why you want to do this?
why not just go outside?

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"Hot Tuna" post=377584 said:

Like the others said though, no way I`m lighting a propane burner in my basement.

I agree 100%

let me ask why you want to do this?
why not just go outside?

With good ventilation it will be NO PROBLEM

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Guest

Don't do it! Would sure miss u here....

My experience with a turkey fryer this past winter, I had my fryer going for about 75 minutes, had the garage door half open to vent the bad gasses, or so I thought. After bout an hour, I started see'n what I will call as star flashes. I instantly knew what it was, my head started pounding bout the same time and started getting blurry vision. I opend the door all the way and went outside for a bit. Yup, I effed up, I know better, atleast now I do. The half open door was not good enough, there was no breaze pulling the gasses out of the garage. So, I will say again, Don't do it! Would sure miss u here....

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look dbrowning is right it will work with good ventilation. but if anything goes wrong with the ventilation it could get very ugly, faster than most people belive. carbon monoxide is heaver than air, colorless, oderless anybody looking down the stairs couldn't tell until it got dense enough to extinguish the flame then maybe they'll smell the gas... if your gonna err then err on the side of caution

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It's dangerous and foolhardy. Stupid too. It's also against fire code to store propane indoors for a reason. Do not do this.

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"dbrowning" post=377587 said:

"Hot Tuna" post=377584 said:

Like the others said though, no way I`m lighting a propane burner in my basement.

I agree 100%

let me ask why you want to do this?
why not just go outside?

With good ventilation it will be NO PROBLEM

Define "good ventilation". I'm firmly in the DON'T DO THIS camp.

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"FedoraDave" post=377634 said:

"dbrowning" post=377587 said:

"Hot Tuna" post=377584 said:

Like the others said though, no way I`m lighting a propane burner in my basement.

I agree 100%

let me ask why you want to do this?
why not just go outside?

With good ventilation it will be NO PROBLEM

Define "good ventilation". I'm firmly in the DON'T DO THIS camp.

i'm in the don't camp but i can answer that. those fans some F.D.s have to clear smoke from buildings would work quite well, if everything on the burner is adjusted and working properly it would even be overkill. if anything goes wrong...well it'll be the last screw up you'll ever make. to qualify, i am speaking of banjo cooker like the bayou classic not the smaller single rings. some i've seen pics of look like a regular stove ring in a metal box. the only issue there may be just bringing the tank in the house. (also not a good idea)

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It probably would be fine.
But only probably. You're rolling the dice. If they come up snake eyes, you risk not only your life, but that of everyone in the house. A few years back in Brookville, a guy decided to kill himself by sitting in his car in the garage, engine running. He wiped out his whole family.

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OK, OK, I said I wasn't doing it. This question came up during a discussion with a fellow worker, whose basic argument was that a gas stove is just a burner in the house with no flue (whether natural gas or propane) and that the danger from using a turkey fryer in the house was more about the boiling oil than the burner. So I thought I would ask the Borg for their collective wisdom. JohnW's story was the most convincing by the way. I also suspect that the burner on the turkey fryer is not up to specs to be used inside either (as JohnW's story proves)

Thanks for all the cautionary responses. I am NOT using it indoors, heck I'm not even at the point of doing unhopped extracts yet.

Monty

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JohnDubya did you just have the big door open and no others? I am asking because I have been brewing in my garage for over a year. I only raise the big door about 4 to 6 inches. Then I leave the little door on the other end of the garage wide open to get air flow through the entire garage. If you have just one door open often that won't create any air flow. The air needs somewhere to go or it won't come in.

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Well, I am in the "I wouldnt to it even in the dead of a yooper winter" camp. But, if I did, I would certainly get a carbon monoxide alarm. Probably the other major danger is that if the flame goes out, suddenly you basement is filled with propane that will go boom once it reaches Mr. Happyflame on the waterheater. Hate it when that happens.

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"Da Yooper" post=377711 said:

Probably the other major danger is that if the flame goes out, suddenly you basement is filled with propane that will go boom once it reaches Mr. Happyflame on the waterheater. Hate it when that happens.

:laugh:

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propane tanks indoors bad idea. We will not do this at work (cookers or heaters) in a enclosed patio (canvas sided tent when it rains) safety first in all things. Unless specifically designed indoor/outdoor use I would not chance it. Another issue is that a fan that can move sufficient air to insure proper ventilation may cause pilot lights to go out. My bother in law is a retired fire chief from a major city in this area advised me against using these types of burners in the basement when I started designing my brewery. His recommendation is to use properly wired electric hot water heating elements to boil & heat water & wort.

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Oh yeah I forgot about that heat stick article. I need to check it out and go that route if at all.

Monty

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