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jivex5k

Danstar Windsor rocks!

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My god....I thought there was a something horribly wrong when my airlock stopped after a day....
I said to myself, relax, stay calm, it could be just awesome yeast.

Yeah, it is! It was done fermenting after 6 days, maybe even sooner but I didn't want to waste too much beer on hydro samples.

I guess the caveat is the low to medium attenuation it has, but when you want a brown ale with a nice full mouthfeel it's the perfect choice.

So here's to you, Danstar Windsor strain, you have stolen my heart.

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That is the yeast I intend to use in my Bourbon Barrel Porter. I want to keep plenty of malt character to counteract the harshness of the oak chips. I have used it before on occasion. It really leaves the character of the malts you use in tact.

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"jivex5k" post=377917 said:

My god....I thought there was a something horribly wrong when my airlock stopped after a day....
I said to myself, relax, stay calm, it could be just awesome yeast.

Yeah, it is! It was done fermenting after 6 days, maybe even sooner but I didn't want to waste too much beer on hydro samples.

I guess the caveat is the low to medium attenuation it has, but when you want a brown ale with a nice full mouthfeel it's the perfect choice.

So here's to you, Danstar Windsor strain, you have stolen my heart.


I just bottled a brown ale was first time I used windsor.
Basically fermented out in a week.
I left it another week before cold crashing and bottled this morning

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I used it for my Moosedrool clone that is 2 1/2 weeks into carbonating / conditioning.

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I recently picked up a Nottingham and a Windsor on-sale at the LHBS. I was planning on putting the Nottingham in an English bitter and the Windsor in a stout, have I got this right or should I consider reversing it?

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Sounds right to me, you'll get a nice thick stout from Windsor.

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Definitely windsor for the stout. Windsor does not attenuate as much as other yeasts. That is what leaves your malt more in tact and what makes your beer fuller bodied. You want your stout to be full bodied and your bitter should be somewhat more dry.

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"Brewbs" post=377961 said:

I recently picked up a Nottingham and a Windsor on-sale at the LHBS. I was planning on putting the Nottingham in an English bitter and the Windsor in a stout, have I got this right or should I consider reversing it?

Windsor is best for the stout. It takes off fast, ferments vigorously and very quickly, but does have a pretty darn low attenuation in the end. If you're taking gravity readings, don't be surprised if the FG for the stout (with lots of roasty unfermentables) stops at close to 1.020. It helps if you start it in the mid 60's, but then ramp it up to 68-70*F after the first 3-4 days.

As a side note, when doing the bitter with Nottingham, be extra mindful about keeping the ferment temp (measured on the fermenter, not air) below 68*F, especially during the first week. I like using Notty, but you have to keep it cooler than other ale yeasts.

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Windsor is supposed to have lower attenuation, like some other yeasts like London ESB, and similar yeasts that were selected specifically for this character. They are meant for malty beers, not for dry beers. Which is why they work great in Milds too, you get a 3% beer with body and flavor.

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Yup mine stopped at 1.020.
4.9% and one hell of a mouthfeel!

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