Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
yankfan9

Trying out Mead Making

Recommended Posts

Would this be a good start to trying out making mead?

http://www.austinhomebrew.com/product_info.php?products_id=13680

http://www.austinhomebrew.com/product_info.php?products_id=13686

I don't really want to do 5 gal batches of this, just want to experiment with something new. Also, I've never had mead before.. Would it be kind of like sweat wine if I were to do this sweet mead recipe posted above? I like sweet white wine but dry wine is :sick: not the best..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

http://www.gotmead.com/index.php?option=com_news_portal&Itemid=381

Be prepared to condition a long time, as in years when doing a mead. It can be drinkable green, but the best mead is 10, 20 even 30 years old. I did some up 3 years back, it's still green. My son may get to drink the final product in a couple decades.

You can make it sweet, dry, what ever you want. There's lots of recipes for mead and others, just like for beer. Google can be your friend.

I've seen mead kits advertised on other sites but I have no experience with them. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

years!?!?!?!

fat chance in hell of me waiting that long. ive got a joam that will be 6 months this week. i think that's long enough thank you. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suggest reading MoreBeers "Guide to Mead Making". (Google morebeer guide to mead making, it will be one of the first few links).

If you follow the nutrient and ph adjustment regimen they lay out you can get mead that is good to drink much sooner then if you do not.

Their kits are bigger then you want to brew, but you can apply the same principles to the Austin Homebrew small batch kits, you just need to get the right kinds of nutrients on your own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've made a few meads, and as others have said - get ready to wait! Sweet meads are generally drinkable much sooner than dry meads, as sweetness covers up some of the "jet fuel" taste. Using a lower alcohol tolerant yeast will help too, but still count on at least a year until it tastes good.

I personally would not spend the money on mead "kits" - instead, get some good quality local honey (or even the 5-pound jugs of clover honey from Costco or Sam's Club if short on funds), some yeast nutrient from the LHBS, and wine/mead yeast. For sweet mead, aim for around 3-3.5 pounds of honey per gallon of water. I've had pretty good results with Cote Des Blancs, D-47, and WY Sweet Mead yeasts.

I don't like to add sulfates to my meads to stabilize, so I ferment to the yeast's alcohol tolerance (13-14%/abv).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"russki" post=379524 said:

I've made a few meads, and as others have said - get ready to wait! Sweet meads are generally drinkable much sooner than dry meads, as sweetness covers up some of the "jet fuel" taste. Using a lower alcohol tolerant yeast will help too, but still count on at least a year until it tastes good.

I personally would not spend the money on mead "kits" - instead, get some good quality local honey (or even the 5-pound jugs of clover honey from Costco or Sam's Club if short on funds), some yeast nutrient from the LHBS, and wine/mead yeast. For sweet mead, aim for around 3-3.5 pounds of honey per gallon of water. I've had pretty good results with Cote Des Blancs, D-47, and WY Sweet Mead yeasts.

I don't like to add sulfates to my meads to stabilize, so I ferment to the yeast's alcohol tolerance (13-14%/abv).

That's some good advice right there.

I was able to find some locally sourced honey at the farmers market and the guy would sell in massive quantities if I wanted.

If you don't want to make 5 gallon batches the 1 gallon equipment kit looks like a decent price.

And as to the time frame I have had varied results. I have had stuff ready in about 6 months and I had one batch that got really good around 3 years and the bottle I had at 3.5 years was still really good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thing I can tell you from when I made mead and maple wine.

For me at least, it was always better to simply pasteurize the must vs. boil the crap out of it like some mead makers do, and I did at first. I always ended up with a drinkable product sooner, and I always had better aromatics in the final product when I did this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"mashani" post=379587 said:

One other thing I can tell you from when I made mead and maple wine.

For me at least, it was always better to simply pasteurize the must vs. boil the crap out of it like some mead makers do, and I did at first. I always ended up with a drinkable product sooner, and I always had better aromatics in the final product when I did this.


+1. Do not boil the honey. Lately, I've not even been heating it - just mix with filtered water, pitch nutrient and yeast, and let'em rip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...