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Darth Trumpetus

Carbonating Time and Temp

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I have a Baby Got Boch that should be carbed and conditioned by now (5 weeks) but is still sweet with some sugar on the bottom of the bottle. Since I used the SA 34/70 for fermentation I kept the bottles at 48F for conditioning. Is that where I went wrong or does this yeast take more time to deal with the sugars? Should I store the bottles at a warmer temp?

I am using 1/2 liter bottles and used 1 tsp per bottle. Pretty sure I wasn't drinking when priming, so i got the sugar amount right. B)

Even though the brew is still too sweet, there is a very nice body and flavor to the brew.

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Is it fully carbonated to the level you were targeting?

If not, I'd let those bottles sit at 70*F or so for a few weeks. Even though you used a lager yeast, that's likely going to be needed to get it to finish.

If there's actual sugar (and not yeast trub) sitting in the bottom of each bottle, you might want to turn them over a few times to get it into solution. I suspect that you're seeing yeast trub.

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My first thought was that it was grub, but then the taste was very sweet - think sweetened tea.

I will put them in a warmer location and see what happens. Thanks for the advice.

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With an ABV of around 7%, this is going to take longer to condition. Add to that that you've had temps low and it's going to take longer. If it would take 8 - 12 weeks based on ABV, then figure 12-16 weeks based on temps. 5 weeks wouldn't work under any temps if it did indeed come out at 7%.

Hopefully you've got trub, not grub, in your bottles. Grub would be bad... :laugh:

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What was the estimated gravity and the final gravity of the beer when you bottled it? If the yeast didn't fully ferment the wort into beer the residual sweetness may be an indication the fermentation didn't fully attenuate.

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