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charlieb

Splitting 5 Gallon Wort into Two LBKs and Stirring

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I finally have fully committed to All Grain. My last necessary item was a wort chiller which I used this weekend.

I live in hot ass Florida. So temperature control is a big issue.

I am making 5 gallon batches and splitting between two LBKs. The LBK is severely convenient for me because I have them in coolers and I can easily regulate temps.

Anyways I am wondering about the wort before splitting and pitching yeast.

Specifically all the "stuff" floating around which by the time my wort chills falls to the bottom of the brew pot.

I am assuming I would want to stir the living sh@t out of the wort before splitting to the LBKs to keep the consistency the same between the two yes?

If I leave it settled at the bottom then one keg will have all the 'extra' stuff and the other will not. Guessing that affects gravity as well as the final flavor/ABV?

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let it settle and leave behind, I normally only have a nice sample to taste from this :)

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"Trollby" post=380599 said:

let it settle and leave behind, I normally only have a nice sample to taste from this :)

Really? Hmmmm.....

This last batch I mixed it up and then split into the kegs. Guessing my Hydro reading is now wrong. Crap!

On that note, that means some of the settled shit will be in one keg and not another.

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just don't rack that last little bit to either keg.

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"azmark" post=380602 said:

just don't rack that last little bit to either keg.

But how can you avoid that? If it's at the bottom where the spout is that is what comes out first.

Should I just drain it down the sink?

BTW what exactly is this stuff? Grain residue? Sugars? Hops?

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you stir the crap out of it anyway to aerate. i perfer to aerate in the pot no chance of scratching the lbk. i continue to stir while splitting to keep the same brew in both lbks. fwiw

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"Jim Johnson" post=380605 said:

you stir the crap out of it anyway to aerate. i perfer to aerate in the pot no chance of scratching the lbk. i continue to stir while splitting to keep the same brew in both lbks. fwiw

I do that anyways. Right now I am questioning all the 'gunk' in the wort.

Do we want it in our fermentor? That is the debate I guess.

Because if we want it, then I need to stir like crazy before dividing it up.

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Your spigot should be located 1/2" or more above the bottom of the pot. That should help you answer the question - there is no reason for the gunk to be in your LBKs.

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I will know for sure in about 4 weeks.

One LBK has the gunk and the other doesn't. One of the nice things about dividing into two kegs.

So if one tastes significantly different than the other there is my answer. If not...then stir away I will.......

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Some people pour everything into fermenters, many don't. I've only done two grain batches. One went all into the fermenter, the other I kept the break in the kettle. I think it only makes a difference in the space used in a fermenter.

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I'm not too worried about the break. It's the stuff that is either floating or sinking to the bottom.

I'm more concerned with consistency and proper hydrometer readings than anything.

All the "gunk" will settle out if you ask me.

But again I will know for sure in a few weeks when I do a comparison.

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I used to worry about this a lot, and about splitting the yeast in the proper amount.
Spend 17 bucks on a 6.5 gallon bucket, or better yet get a bottling bucket.
Then you can just siphon the wort into the bucket while leaving the break in the kettle, top it off to 5 gallons if needed, pitch the yeast and stir it up.
Then split it between the two lbks.

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"jivex5k" post=380675 said:

I used to worry about this a lot, and about splitting the yeast in the proper amount.
Spend 17 bucks on a 6.5 gallon bucket, or better yet get a bottling bucket.
Then you can just siphon the wort into the bucket while leaving the break in the kettle, top it off to 5 gallons if needed, pitch the yeast and stir it up.
Then split it between the two lbks.

Hmmmmm.......

What's more interesting about your post is the reference to the yeast.

I actually use two different yeasts. I don't split my yeast. I am now washing my yeasts so the money isn't a problem. I like trying different yeasts on the same batch to see which I prefer.

However pitching once and then draining into the LBK's does sound nice.

Good suggestion. Thanks man!

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Let the wort cool down in the kettle add an ounce of hops to it and whirlpool, this is called knockout hopping. Aroma is added to the wort as long as it's above 170F and gives the beer a different aroma than dry hopping does. Once the worts cooled down rack only the wort to your fermentor leaving the hops and cold break behind.

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"Screwy Brewer" post=380679 said:

Let the wort cool down in the kettle add an ounce of hops to it and whirlpool, this is called knockout hopping. Aroma is added to the wort as long as it's above 170F and gives the beer a different aroma than dry hopping does. Once the worts cooled down rack only the wort to your fermentor leaving the hops and coldness behind.

I hate to sound stupid here but by 'whirlpool' you mean stir to create an actual whirlpool?

And by doing this aren't you remixing all the stuff back together?

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"charlieb" post=380682 said:

"Screwy Brewer" post=380679 said:

Let the wort cool down in the kettle add an ounce of hops to it and whirlpool, this is called knockout hopping. Aroma is added to the wort as long as it's above 170F and gives the beer a different aroma than dry hopping does. Once the worts cooled down rack only the wort to your fermentor leaving the hops and coldness behind.

I hate to sound stupid here but by 'whirlpool' you mean stir to create an actual whirlpool?

And by doing this aren't you remixing all the stuff back together?

yes but it's also still 170 gonna have to cool some more so it'll have time to resettle. imo

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"charlieb" post=380682 said:

"Screwy Brewer" post=380679 said:

Let the wort cool down in the kettle add an ounce of hops to it and whirlpool, this is called knockout hopping. Aroma is added to the wort as long as it's above 170F and gives the beer a different aroma than dry hopping does. Once the worts cooled down rack only the wort to your fermentor leaving the hops and coldness behind.

I hate to sound stupid here but by 'whirlpool' you mean stir to create an actual whirlpool?

And by doing this aren't you remixing all the stuff back together?


You live in Florida where its hot chances are your wort's taking a good deal of time to cool down anyway, why not put that time to good use. By the time the cold break compacts into a nice neat little pile in the center of your kettle you could also be adding 30 minutes of extra aroma hopping time. Most of my cold break takes about that long to completely settle out to the bottom of the kettle leaving an nice clear wort ready for the fermentor.

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I guess this is where my lack of experience is showing.

I do not have a false bottom.

So all the residue whether that be hot break or grain or whatever is at the bottom after I come down to temp, so it will come out into my kegs before pitching. Not all of it of course, but a good chunk.

I guess this kind of goes back to my original question.

If I remix this shite back into suspension, then my hydrometer readings are wrong and I could have unintended flavors.....yes?

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"charlieb" post=380737 said:

I guess this is where my lack of experience is showing.

I do not have a false bottom.

You don't need one, use a kettle valve, auto-siphon or spigot to transfer the wort to the fermentor.

So all the residue whether that be hot break or grain or whatever is at the bottom after I come down to temp, so it will come out into my kegs before pitching. Not all of it of course, but a good chunk.

No the idea is to let as little of it get into the fermentor as possible, adding 1/4 tablet of WhirFloc to the boil will ensure the wort will clear after cooling in the kettle.

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OK good to know Screwy.

And I'm right about my hydro readings being off yes?

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I have a wort chiller so stirring it more or less not an option.

However I just picked up some whirfloc so I will give that a try.

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