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ocarolina

Looking for a good summer brew recipe

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First let me say, I am new here and brand new to brewing. My husband is the brewer in our house and he has been brewing for years. I am looking forward to learning how to brew myself, being that I am a professional chef. I do not want to be bashed, or made fun of for my tastes, but I am looking for a light summer brew and I really like weiss beers with lemon. If anyone has any recommendations, I am going to the brew store locally today. I am not a regular beer drinker, and do not like heavy beers. I am a classically French trained chef, and have a great palate, but I find that heavy beers tend to coat my palate too much, so I am looking for a lighter summer drink to enjoy in my tiki hut at home.
My husband grows Centennial hops in our yard, and I am not sure they are good for what I want to brew. Any suggestions?

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There are 2 summer seasonals for sale now until they run out. I've not tried them but many have the Spring seasonal ready to drink.
Welcome to the borg and though we occasionally pick on commercial beer drinkers, it's all in fun and not meant to be mean.

It's cool you have hops growing. I wish I could but my climate wouldn't do them well.

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Growing them is effortless - we are in zone 5 and they go dormant over winter, and kick back into growth in spring. I give them a regular organic fertilizer and I compost all my produce scraps. They literally grow on their own, and we have to regularly cut them back to keep them from coming up through the grass. We have to try to harvest them before the Japanese beetles are in full swing, or they like to have their own feast. I will check out the two beers, and see if they sound good. My husband has his own tastes for craft beers, and usually they do not coincide with mine. My favorite was a beer called Kristall from Weinkeller restaurant, but I think they went out of business years ago. That is what I want to try to make.
As for commercial beer, I do not much indulge, unless I have been out working in the yard, and come in for beer and pizza. I am an enthusiast in scratch-making of most things I eat or consume. I roast coffee, I garden, and make most things from scratch. That is my reasoning for wanting to try beer-making.

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[attachment=14028]welcome-smiley_2013-06-29.gif[/attachment]


Think you will find you are in good company, there are several chefs here. My wife and I are both pastry chefs. Funny thing she is boss at work too :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

What type of brewer are you guys extract, extract with grains, partial mashing, all grain or all of the above!! I think you will want to stick to the noble hops. They will add just enough to balance your beers sweetness, give you some aroma and hop flavor. Your yeast is going to be very important to your beer. It is to beer what location is to wine. What flavors are you looking to highlight in your beer, clove, banana and/or a spicy note? The best way to add any citrus notes or flavor for me is to add an essential oil at bottling time

I gave up on growing hops this year. Watching a wild turkey dig up the plants was the last straw!!! The deer and rabbits were bad enough!!

--Bob

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Welcome to the :borg: and i agree that with a wheat bear you would be better off with some of the noble hops

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Welcome aboard The Obsession ocarolina! If you're like the rest of us here you'll soon be awash in a sea of beer and setting sail on many great brewing adventures. There's lot's of information here and plenty of hands to help you get under way. You'll soon be producing some memorable beers and having a lot of fun too in the days ahead.

Navigate on over to our Advanced Brewing Techniques area of the forum and read over the

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417" target="_blank" title="http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?

option=com_kunena&Itemid=124&func=view&catid=18&id=202417">'4 Things Every Brewer Should Know About Yeast'

sticky. Yeast is a living cell, keep them healthy and they'll ferment you up some awesome tasting beers.

Set your course and sail on over to our New Brewers and FAQs area of the forum and read over the 'Malt To Adjunct Ratios' sticky.

Remember for the best tasting beer you'll want no less than 80% of the alcohol to come from malts and no more than 20% of the alcohol to come from sugars or other adjuncts.

Give your beer at least 2-3 weeks to ferment and another 3-4 weeks to carbonate and condition before refrigerating. I know it's going to be hard to resist popping them open sooner, but like with anything homebrewing it'll be worth the wait.

When using any priming calculator enter the warmest temperature that your fermenting beer has endured between the time you pitched your yeast until bottling day. This has to do with the beer's residual level of Co2, or the ability for beer to absorb Co2 into solution during fermentation. For a typical Ale fermenting around 70F the residual Co2 will be around .83 volumes, which is then subtracted from whatever Co2 level you entered as your target.


Example 1: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 70F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 2: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 60F - Enter 70F for the temperature
Example 3: Beer was fermented at 70F and bottled at 80F - Enter 80F for the temperature

Higher levels of Co2 will stay in solution when the beer is colder, as the beer warms up more Co2 will be released from solution. Hope that helps.

This is my glass of beer. There are many like it, but this one is mine. Without me my beer is useless. Without my beer, I am useless. ~ Screwy Brewer

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If you want a really light refreshing summer sipper try brewing up an American wheat beer, it's one of my favorite styles of beer. It's basically a wheat beer recipe using American 'C' hops and pitched with any clean fermenting yeast, my favorites for this style are ECY-10, WLP-001 or Wyeast-1056.


A fast fermentation below 72F will reduce ester development, this style is best when only the grain and citrusy IPA like aromas and flavors are present. A good cold crash will help the yeast to drop out even more making this beer appeal to folks who don't like heavy yeasty European style wheat beers too.

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center ocarolina. You will be assimilated. Resistance is Quite Futile: We have Beer.

We're not into bashing people here. We're here for the Beer. We are more than happy to give advice, and as always, you are quite free not to take it. We figure you ask, we answer (not always agreeing). The end results will be, you're drinking it, not us. It's your palate, not ours. Given enough information, we should be able to help you narrow it down to where you like it.
As asked already, we'll need to know what level you feel comfortable with in the brewing.
Extract only
Extract with some grains
All Grain.
We can cover them all here.

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We ended up doing a wheat beer yesterday with Pilsen Malt and White Wheat Malt using the brew in a bag method for the first time. I used some lemon peel in the last 10 minutes of the boil that we got at the brew store. I am going simple for my first brew with hubby. He has been using extracts but we are looking into the investment to start all grain since it will be a lot cheaper in the long run. This is only a 14 day fermentation with ABW 5.24%. We force carbonate in a keg, so I do not have to wait another 2 weeks for that. It actually looked disgusting when it went in the carboy, but it tasted pretty good. Now the wait to see if it will turn out to be good. We used Wyeast 1010 - not sure about yeast qualities since I am new - but it was $8.00 for the smack pack. I will continue searching this forum to learn more, as my brain is a sponge for all tings new.

Bob- you must be a saint to work for your wife - my husband does not cook, but I cannot imagine working with him LOL.

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So you do a 14 day fermentation..you testing with a hydrometer for final gravity?
Nothing wrong with extracts.
There is plenty of information here for building most of the equipment you'll need for AG brews. That should help save some coinage for you.
Do y'all harvest your yeast?

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"ocarolina" post=383127 said:

We ended up doing a wheat beer yesterday with Pilsen Malt and White Wheat Malt using the brew in a bag method for the first time. I used some lemon peel in the last 10 minutes of the boil that we got at the brew store. I am going simple for my first brew with hubby. He has been using extracts but we are looking into the investment to start all grain since it will be a lot cheaper in the long run. This is only a 14 day fermentation with ABW 5.24%. We force carbonate in a keg, so I do not have to wait another 2 weeks for that. It actually looked disgusting when it went in the carboy, but it tasted pretty good. Now the wait to see if it will turn out to be good. We used Wyeast 1010 - not sure about yeast qualities since I am new - but it was $8.00 for the smack pack. I will continue searching this forum to learn more, as my brain is a sponge for all tings new.

Bob- you must be a saint to work for your wife - my husband does not cook, but I cannot imagine working with him LOL.

Sounds like a good brew. Wyeast is one of my favorite brand of yeast. You guys will find that you can not beat the fresh taste of an All Grain beer.

Do not know if she will agree with you there :laugh: :laugh:

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Yes we have a hydrometer for specific gravity - tested after brew to make sure we were on target(we were) and will test again. This was the first time using all grain. We have not harvested the yeast, but may look into starting that. I am just excited that I did not mess anything up so far. :banana:

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"ocarolina" post=383460 said:

Yes we have a hydrometer for specific gravity - tested after brew to make sure we were on target(we were) and will test again. This was the first time using all grain. We have not harvested the yeast, but may look into starting that. I am just excited that I did not mess anything up so far. :banana:


Congratulations on completed a major milestone in brewing. Stick with it and the folks here will help you enormously when it comes to setting up an all grain system, perfecting recipes and just about anything brewing.

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