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Gman30

rehydrating dry yeast..or not

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so im about to start my second batch i figured the yeast could be poured on top of cooled wort but back of yeast pack gives directions for rehydrating.......so can i skip this step?

also if i have to do it what would be a easy and clean way to do it?

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yes but if you can get wort same temp.. what would be difference plus its an extra step to contaminate brew

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I never counted my MrBeer batches. But I do know I have done 74 5gallon batches. I have tried rehydrating and not rehydrating. On a beer less than 1.060 I honestly cannot tell a difference. My BRY 97 gives directions on the package how to rehydrate, I never have and have had no issues. I honestly believe a good pitching temperature and good ariation trumps the need, if it even is a need, to rehydrate.

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"Gymrat" post=384211 said:

I never counted my MrBeer batches. But I do know I have done 74 5gallon batches. I have tried rehydrating and not rehydrating. On a beer less than 1.060 I honestly cannot tell a difference. My BRY 97 gives directions on the package how to rehydrate, I never have and have had no issues. I honestly believe a good pitching temperature and good ariation trumps the need, if it even is a need, to rehydrate.

+1 been rehydrating every batch since my third, only had 2 batches so far that said i had to. but i had lots of practice. it cannot hurt to develop this skill set

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Often discussed on the forum. Split opinions. Instructions to rehydrate yeast can be found on the yeast manufacturer's website. Mr. Beer instructions don't include rehydrating Mr. Beer yeast.

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The point of rehydrating yeast is that you want your fermentation to start quickly and enthusiastically, partly to get the fermentation finished sooner and partly to minimize off flavors from stressed yeast. In theory one viable yeast cell would eventually reproduce enough to ferment your entire batch, but there are reasons why the people who are really serious about brewing not only use many billions of yeast cells (and know how many) but get them as healthy and active as possible first. My impression is that it's not essential to rehydrate MB yeast when making a standard MB refill; the company ships stuff that will work when used as described in the directions. The more work your yeast has to do (the more fermentables in your wort) the more you need to pamper it. With the seasonals and with high gravity recipes MB ships different yeasts, and they need to be used according to the directions for that recipe.

Screwy Brewer ( http://www.thescrewybrewer.com/ ) seems to be the borg's yeast guru.

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"pspearing" post=384217 said:

The point of rehydrating yeast is that you want your fermentation to start quickly and enthusiastically, partly to get the fermentation finished sooner and partly to minimize off flavors from stressed yeast. In theory one viable yeast cell would eventually reproduce enough to ferment your entire batch, but there are reasons why the people who are really serious about brewing not only use many billions of yeast cells (and know how many) but get them as healthy and active as possible first. My impression is that it's not essential to rehydrate MB yeast when making a standard MB refill; the company ships stuff that will work when used as described in the directions. The more work your yeast has to do (the more fermentables in your wort) the more you need to pamper it. With the seasonals and with high gravity recipes MB ships different yeasts, and they need to be used according to the directions for that recipe.

Screwy Brewer ( http://www.thescrewybrewer.com/ ) seems to be the borg's yeast guru.

On that note, LOTS of oxygen in the wort and a good pitching temp greatly reduces the stress on the yeast. I typically see bubbles in my air lock less than 24 hours after pitching. Often around 12 hours.

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"Gymrat" post=384223 said:

"pspearing" post=384217 said:

The point of rehydrating yeast is that you want your fermentation to start quickly and enthusiastically, partly to get the fermentation finished sooner and partly to minimize off flavors from stressed yeast. In theory one viable yeast cell would eventually reproduce enough to ferment your entire batch, but there are reasons why the people who are really serious about brewing not only use many billions of yeast cells (and know how many) but get them as healthy and active as possible first. My impression is that it's not essential to rehydrate MB yeast when making a standard MB refill; the company ships stuff that will work when used as described in the directions. The more work your yeast has to do (the more fermentables in your wort) the more you need to pamper it. With the seasonals and with high gravity recipes MB ships different yeasts, and they need to be used according to the directions for that recipe.

Screwy Brewer ( http://www.thescrewybrewer.com/ ) seems to be the borg's yeast guru.

On that note, LOTS of oxygen in the wort and a good pitching temp greatly reduces the stress on the yeast. I typically see bubbles in my air lock less than 24 hours after pitching. Often around 12 hours.


I'm with Gymrat. I also usually throw some yeast nutrient in toward the end of the boil and I do notice less lag time when I do.

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I rehydrate all my dry yeast, because even though it's a couple extra steps, it's not as if it actually takes oodles more time, and if it's going to help my yeast get started quicker, I'm all for it.

Once you incorporate the steps into your brew day, it doesn't take all that much more time, nor does it increase the risk of infection, as the OP said. You're boiling water and letting it cool, and using sanitized utensils. The potential benefits far outweigh the potential risks, IMO.

Perhaps the proper pitching temp and good aeration will help without rehydrating, but how much better would it be to employ proper pitching temp, good aeration and more (and healthier) yeast cells due to rehydration?

Again, if it's going to help my yeast get started quicker and perform better, I'm all for it.

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Here's another - Rehydrating Dry Yeast with Dr. Clayton Cone

IMO, it's good brewing practice to:

-rehydrate dry yeast.
-make starters when using liquid yeast for 5 gallon batches.
-chill ale wort to 62-64*F
-chill lager wort to 45-48*F
-actively control fermentation temps to keep them optimal

Other than the obvious area of good sanitation (which StarSan makes much easier), creating/maintaining the best conditions for your yeast to do its job has more of an influence on the quality of your brew than anything else.

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I make a 500 ml starter with my dry and or liquid yeast. The liguid yeast can be a previously dry yeast or a liquid. I boil and mix 1/4 cup of light DME the night before. It gets my stuff going in about 4 hours. I mix in plenty of oxygen while shaking the beaker with the starter.

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I don't do it because by the time I have spent 4 hours brewing I am tired and wanting to get my equipment cleaned up and put away so I can do other things. The time that I would be needing to boil my water and bring it down to temperature I am using to sanitize my buckets, strainer, and other tools. Then I am stirring my wort to get it down to temperature. If I ever had an issue with symptoms of underpitching then it would be worth my while. But in 74 5 gallon batches now that has never happened. When I make a 1.070 beer or above I double pitch just in case.

However what I do do, is get my wort at least into the mid 60s. With my new pond pump getting it into the lower 60s is possible now. My wort gets oxygenated when I pour it through my strainer into two different buckets, then get oxygenated even more when I dump one bucket into the other vigorously. I do toss a little yeast nutrient in at the end of my boil as well.

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I never bother in LBK sized batches where I'm pitching the full pack, or a normal gravity beer.

In a bigger batch or a high gravity batch lbk batch then I will do it.

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