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Btech117

Can't believe I did this...

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Ok So im fairly new to home brewing - and I started off probably above my head Im brewing 3 beers (stagered 1 week apart ) and Yesterday I started the 2013 Summer seasonal beer - I boiled the watter added the HME and filled to the line on the cask as instructed... Than I FORGOT TO add the yeast - im at work now and have my wife putting the yeast on it now.

My question is how bad did i mess this batch up as it has sat (less than 24 hours) with no yeast and just as Wort....

Any help would be appriciated

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Most likely if sat, closed in undisturbed condition, it will be just fine.

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the yeast packet also says to "Re hydrate it" however the instructions online say nothing about this...

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Welcome, Btech. No serious harm done there. All should be well. You're off to a nice starting pace. WTG.

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Just have her sprinkle it on. You can learn how to rehydrate on future batches. The beer will be fine.

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Ok - She got it going for me - I assume i start my 2 weeks fermentation process as of Today's date ?

Also what does it mean by "Re hydrate " what are the benefits of this ?

and can someone tell me what LBK Means? I see allot of abbreviation on this forum but don't know what they mean do they have a link that could explain

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LBK is Little Brown Keg...it is your barrel fermenter. There is another thread where the merits of rehydrating is being discussed. It is basically putting your yeast in water at a certain temperature before pitching it. I never do this others think it is detrimental not to do so. I will refer you to the other thread and let you make up your own mind.

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Also you are correct, your fermenting time begins with the pitching of the yeast.

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It will be fine. Sure don't have to worry about the pitching temp in this case!!

Yes, 2 weeks starts today but a lot of us (most) go three unless yo have a hydro and can take gravity readings.

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I do have a hydro however have not played with it or have figured out how to take the OG yet - Hoping to do some research on it and start testing with the hyrdo on my 4th batch (Patriot lauger i just ordered today) I figured id KISS on my first 3 batches and follow the 2-2-2 rule i have read about

2 weeks ferm. 2 weeks carb 2 weeks condition in fridge.

Also Gymrat what is this "Pitching Temp" you speak of on the other link - I assume your refering to the temperature that you sprinkle the yeast in at? The directions never said anything about a specific temp i have usually just got done boiling and filling the LBK and than toss my yeast in - should i be loging the temperature in my journal and make sure that the yeast goes in a a scertin point?

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Btech. Welcome to the Borg.
The hydro is easy to use, just fill the cylinder about 3/4 full and gently put the float in, give it a little spin with your finger and when it stops bobbing around take your reading from the graduated lines...look at your directions. The higher it floats the higher your gravity.

Remember and this is the most important: SANITIZE every thing that touches your beer!
3weeks in the LBK and 4 minimum for carb/conditioning at room temp, then put one in the fridge to taste.
Pitching temp is the temp that your wort is at when you add your yeast..this is important and I record this on my brew sheet.

You can google the abreviations, that's what my kids taught me, to find out what they mean here without asking for each one. I was clueless for a while.
Most important is SWMBO she who must be obeyed They can put a quick halt to the brew career, so I try to include the LOML love of my life in all my activities.

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"Btech117" post=384410 said:

I do have a hydro however have not played with it or have figured out how to take the OG yet - Hoping to do some research on it and start testing with the hyrdo on my 4th batch (Patriot lauger i just ordered today) I figured id KISS on my first 3 batches and follow the 2-2-2 rule i have read about

2 weeks ferm. 2 weeks carb 2 weeks condition in fridge.

Also Gymrat what is this "Pitching Temp" you speak of on the other link - I assume your refering to the temperature that you sprinkle the yeast in at? The directions never said anything about a specific temp i have usually just got done boiling and filling the LBK and than toss my yeast in - should i be loging the temperature in my journal and make sure that the yeast goes in a a scertin point?

222 is bad bad bad the way you have it.

Only 2 weeks in the bottle before it hits the fridge will be young, and most likely under carbed.

Leave in bottle at room temp for a min of one month,,,,2 better, in fridge for 2 days......

My version of 222

Two weeks in fermenter....
Two months in bottle at room temp...
Two days in fridge...

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Many terms are listed in the Brewer's Glossary on the left side of the page. Many, not all, and inexplicably not LBK...

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"azmark" post=384428 said:

"Btech117" post=384410 said:

I do have a hydro however have not played with it or have figured out how to take the OG yet - Hoping to do some research on it and start testing with the hyrdo on my 4th batch (Patriot lauger i just ordered today) I figured id KISS on my first 3 batches and follow the 2-2-2 rule i have read about

2 weeks ferm. 2 weeks carb 2 weeks condition in fridge.

Also Gymrat what is this "Pitching Temp" you speak of on the other link - I assume your refering to the temperature that you sprinkle the yeast in at? The directions never said anything about a specific temp i have usually just got done boiling and filling the LBK and than toss my yeast in - should i be loging the temperature in my journal and make sure that the yeast goes in a a scertin point?

222 is bad bad bad the way you have it.

Only 2 weeks in the bottle before it hits the fridge will be young, and most likely under carbed.

Leave in bottle at room temp for a min of one month,,,,2 better, in fridge for 2 days......

My version of 222

Two weeks in fermenter....
Two months in bottle at room temp...
Two days in fridge...

You are a very patient individual. A lot more so than I am. This wouldn't work with the PET bottles, but in glass bottles, I always have one 6 to 7 days after bottling. They are always fully carbed by then. My wheats and my IPAs actually taste their best that soon. My other beers sometimes have a bitter finish or taste like the flavors haven't blended yet, but it gives me an idea of how my beer turned out. I figure since I got 50 bottles out of the batch, why not?

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"Btech117" post=384410 said:

I do have a hydro however have not played with it or have figured out how to take the OG yet - Hoping to do some research on it and start testing with the hyrdo on my 4th batch (Patriot lauger i just ordered today) I figured id KISS on my first 3 batches and follow the 2-2-2 rule i have read about

2 weeks ferm. 2 weeks carb 2 weeks condition in fridge.
Also Gymrat what is this "Pitching Temp" you speak of on the other link - I assume your refering to the temperature that you sprinkle the yeast in at? The directions never said anything about a specific temp i have usually just got done boiling and filling the LBK and than toss my yeast in - should i be loging the temperature in my journal and make sure that the yeast goes in a a scertin point?

:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center Btech117. You will be assimilated. Resistance is Quite Futile: WE have Beer.

Once you put the beer in the fridge...ALL activity stops. the yeast goes to sleep. You need to ROOM temp condition your beers. So if you have a few young ones that you are "conditioning" in the fridge, take them back out. and start the clock again tomorrow once they are back up to room temp.
As far as Pitching Temp, some yeasts feel good at 90*F. Normally, we try to pitch (as an average) below 80*F. If you pitch the yeast (pitch=toss) in too warm a wort, the yeast dies.

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@Gymrat

Comments were on OP. If your getting 50 bottles, my guess is your not doing Mr Beer? Or at least highly modified.

For most Mr. Beer basic kits (no IPAs here) my 222 method would most likely work best.

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Yes pitching temperature is the temp of the wort when you pitch the yeast. It is best if you can keep that in the 60s. When I first went to a LHBS (local home brew store) the guy told me anything under 80 degrees is fine. I soon discovered that, yeah the yeast will work under 80 degrees, but I got off flavors and a couple of stuck fermentations. Then I started looking closer at my pitching temperatures. They do make a difference.

When using an LBK a good pitching temperature is easy to achieve. Simply bring a gallon or two of water to a boil the night before, cool it, and put it in the fridge. On brew day get your wort cool enough to put into the LBK, then dump the refridgerated water into it. And by golly wally you will have 60 degree wort.

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azmark as I said PET bottles will not carb in a week. But I even did this when I was doing MrBeer batches after I switched to glass bottles. I used to get 22 bottles from a batch. I would actually try one bottle a week to see the difference as they aged.

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Ok the moderators in the chat told me to ferment for 2 weeks than carb them at room temp for 2 weeks than move to fridge for 2 weeks of conditioning .... So these wont be ready for another 2 months?

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I am botteling them in glass bottles and got 22 bottles out of my American Classic Light (came with Kit ) My American Classic is due to bottle next Wednesday .... and than My Summer Seasonal Just started today and has 2 weeks until ready to bottle

Do i need to wait 2 months on the Classic light in the bottles?

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If you are using PET bottles don't put them in the fridge until they are rock solid. When I was using those sometimes it would take up to a month before they were fully inflated. If you are using PET bottles, in my opinion, you should wait 6 weeks before you put them in the fridge. I think the reason it takes them longer to carbonate is because the CO2 inflates the bottle before it starts getting forced into the beer. That is just my own theory and not based on any science.

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"Btech117" post=384449 said:

I am botteling them in glass bottles and got 22 bottles out of my American Classic Light (came with Kit ) My American Classic is due to bottle next Wednesday .... and than My Summer Seasonal Just started today and has 2 weeks until ready to bottle

Do i need to wait 2 months on the Classic light in the bottles?

No! With glass bottles go ahead and chill a couple of them 2 weeks after bottling. Unless you are like me and the curiosity is just too much for you, then chill just 1 a week after bottling...but know that the flavor will improve in the coming weeks.

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Plus if you are using the 1 liter bottles,,, and you open one,,, and it's flat,,,, or cidery tasting,,, you've lost a good deal of your total batch.

Go buy a 12 or two of good craft beer in the mean time,,,study styles, make empty bottles, buy a capper and caps, and you'll have new bottles, and easily pass the time until your beer is ready.

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"Gymrat" post=384434 said:

"azmark" post=384428 said:

"Btech117" post=384410 said:

I do have a hydro however have not played with it or have figured out how to take the OG yet - Hoping to do some research on it and start testing with the hyrdo on my 4th batch (Patriot lauger i just ordered today) I figured id KISS on my first 3 batches and follow the 2-2-2 rule i have read about

2 weeks ferm. 2 weeks carb 2 weeks condition in fridge.

Also Gymrat what is this "Pitching Temp" you speak of on the other link - I assume your refering to the temperature that you sprinkle the yeast in at? The directions never said anything about a specific temp i have usually just got done boiling and filling the LBK and than toss my yeast in - should i be loging the temperature in my journal and make sure that the yeast goes in a a scertin point?

222 is bad bad bad the way you have it.

Only 2 weeks in the bottle before it hits the fridge will be young, and most likely under carbed.

Leave in bottle at room temp for a min of one month,,,,2 better, in fridge for 2 days......

My version of 222

Two weeks in fermenter....
Two months in bottle at room temp...
Two days in fridge...

You are a very patient individual. A lot more so than I am. This wouldn't work with the PET bottles, but in glass bottles, I always have one 6 to 7 days after bottling. They are always fully carbed by then. My wheats and my IPAs actually taste their best that soon. My other beers sometimes have a bitter finish or taste like the flavors haven't blended yet, but it gives me an idea of how my beer turned out. I figure since I got 50 bottles out of the batch, why not?

+1! I can't imagine waiting 2 months to drink a batch of beer. Most are fully carbed

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I am botteling them in glass bottles and got 22 bottles out of my American Classic Light (came with Kit ) My American Classic is due to bottle next Wednesday .... and than My Summer Seasonal Just started today and has 2 weeks until ready to bottle

Do i need to wait 2 months on the Classic light in the bottles?

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"Btech117" post=384454 said:

I am botteling them in glass bottles and got 22 bottles out of my American Classic Light (came with Kit ) My American Classic is due to bottle next Wednesday .... and than My Summer Seasonal Just started today and has 2 weeks until ready to bottle

Do i need to wait 2 months on the Classic light in the bottles?

I think you should be the judge... Try some, see if they improve over time.

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we have found through trial and error..and lots of beer.. that you will get your best results if you allow the beer to ferment for 3 week, unless you use a hydrometer and get a constant reading 2 times in a row (read 2 days apart). You would be looking for 1/4 your original gravity. that's why it's important to get your original gravity reading. You get that before you add your yeast, as once the fermentation process takes of, well.. you don't know what the ORIGINAL reading would have been, as some has been converted.
The first 2 weeks in the bottle, the priming sugar is being converted mostly to "captured" Co2 to carbinate your soon to be beer.
The next two weeks, the yeast is cleaning up after the party. This is where the "cider" taste is taken out by the yeast, along with any othere missed item. This has to be done at room temp as well. If you put the beer in the fridge at this time, the yest will just go to sleep and pass out on the bottom of your beer. If you want, if you're just going to let the beer carb, and not age, you can just toss it in the fridge, let it sit till it's cold, and drink it. It won't taste as good as it can, but you'll have the same results as if you primed the bottle, let it sit at room temp for 2 weeks, and then stoped the action.
you can get by with just having the beer in the fridge over night. But at least 2 or 3 days would be better.

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Nope I brew Whiskey and Wine as well - Just started with beer though - Shoot me a PM if ya ever come down this way.

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"Btech117" post=384446 said:

Ok the moderators in the chat told me to ferment for 2 weeks than carb them at room temp for 2 weeks than move to fridge for 2 weeks of conditioning .... So these wont be ready for another 2 months?

The overwhelming majority of folks here seem to go with 3 weeks in fermenter and 4 weeks in bottle at the least, so it would basically be 7 weeks from the day you start it before the batch is ready to drink, so yes, basically it will be a couple of months, so to speak.

Tip: You can sneak off a sample after 2 or 3 weeks in the bottle, both to satisfy your curiosity and to help you learn first hand the difference between beer at 2 weeks in bottle, 3 weeks in bottle, 4 weeks in bottle, etc. A lot of folks make a few small 8 or 12 oz bottles in each batch just for this purpose.

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OK so the 4 weeks in the bottle would that be 2 at room temp and 2 in the fridge?

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222 will work, and you'll have drinkable beer. It won't taste the same as if you let it condition a couple more weeks. Will it be better or worse? That's up to you to decide. Generally it's more mature with more time.

2 weeks fermentation: I use a refractometer to read my FG (final gravity) and for most MrB recipes it's done by week 2, usually even earlier. For high OG's (original gravity) I've gone longer a few times.

2 weeks carb: Fine for most that I've bottled in glass or kegged. The pet bottles are not rigid, so they give a little as the beer carbs and some CO2 goes toward filling up the extra space. Glass and steel are rigid, so all the CO2 goes into the beer.

2 weeks condition: Depends on the temp. Cool (not fridge temp though) temps condition slower but more gently. High temps (like my kitchen) will carb and condition faster but with potentially off-putting alterations in taste.

The fridge time is independent of the other conditioning. It clarifies the beer as the yeast and other by-products of carbonation settle to the bottom. It just needs a few days, in my experience.

As your pipeline grows and you have a chance to experiment, you'll find what works best for you. My first MrB kit I did 222. Was it the best beer I've made? No, but I drank it, it was good enough and I was proud of it, and very satisfied with myself. And I'm still brewing and learning!

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Well my next issue now that i know the 3-4 rule is my temperature

Here in Nevada we are having high heat waves and my little swamp cooler in the house isnt keeping it cool enough so today i went out and bought a new refidgerator for the wife (so i can have her old one) I plan to set it to 70 degrese and leave my LBK's in there to keep constant temp lower than what i can supply in the house my temps are getting near 75 and the last thing i want is off flavor of beer.

What are your thoughts / Opinions about this?

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will i be able to keep the fridge in temp range by just adjusting and keeping a thermometer inside? Wouldnt this be better than it being in a hot cabinet in the house?

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That is awsome i think i may hit radio shack and see if they have that controller - the only ones im finding are in china and will take long to ship (I dont have the patience at this time due to the fact i have 2 more beers going in wednesday

Do you think the fridge will keep it in temp range if i leave it on low and test a flat budweiser in a tub simiilar to the LBK? just shooting ideas here know they may be stupid

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"Btech117" post=384728 said:

Do you think the fridge will keep it in temp range if i leave it on low and test a flat budweiser in a tub simiilar to the LBK? just shooting ideas here know they may be stupid


I'm actually sticking a radio signal temperature gauge inside my cooler with a piece/pieces of blue ice in there and experimenting with temps just to get an idea right now.

Going to leave it in there overnight and see what happens.

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By the way Jim Thank you for that post that is AWSOME and hope soon i will be able to make one for the next fridge i get although im hoping if i make my own it will have 2 outlets for "Cooling" Rahter than heating

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"Btech117" post=384736 said:

Browns ... sorry you lost me big time! LOL

Well, a stretch for your topic... but I saw that you were experimenting with temps inside your fridge.

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"Btech117" post=384728 said:

That is awsome i think i may hit radio shack and see if they have that controller - the only ones im finding are in china and will take long to ship (I dont have the patience at this time due to the fact i have 2 more beers going in wednesday

Do you think the fridge will keep it in temp range if i leave it on low and test a flat budweiser in a tub simiilar to the LBK? just shooting ideas here know they may be stupid

Refrigerators don't have a setting that allows them to run in the 60s or low 70s. Either get a controller or use an ice chest and switch out frozen water bottles.

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Refrigerators don't have a setting that allows them to run in the 60s or low 70s.

That was kind of the point of my post:

Without a Johnson Controller, I don't think you will be able to set a fridge on 70.


Also why Clyde was grabbin' the popcorn and watching the drama unfold.

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Ok well I ordered the same stuff as in the video you showed me - It should be here tomorrow and will let yall know how it goes - was just asking if it was better to be in the fridge with out controller or in a hot cabinet. (both are out of temp range by a few deg.

Thanks for the help

Also seems like a stupid question but once i have a outlet for heating and an outlet for cooling - If its summer in nevada and hot outside I would want it on COOLING right? TO Turn ON when it goes above that temp right? Or would iust the same as Heating?

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In NV you'll want cooling almost year round only.

Just set for the temp you want to keep the fridge at.... ie 64*

As it warms above 64* the fridge will kick on.

If using the heat, you might want to set it a 61*?? Or some odd temp.

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Hey NP dont know why you deleted your post but thanks for the PM = It may seem hostile but they are fellow brewers just irritated with our newby questions lol

Please send another pm i deleted your message and cant find you agaijn - yes im in winnemucca and is awsome to have someone in my area - (hope you dont mind) Elko brewer is also in our area

keep your beer in temp is what im learning and if you go spend money on a fridge make sure you dont do what i did and expect it to be at temp a " Johnson Controller " is required see the video 1 page back im making mine tomorrow and only cost me 44 dollars and 60 for a fridge . Hope this helps .

BTW they say a 3 week fermentaion and 4 week conditioning (BEFORE IN FRIDGE) is the way to go not the 2-2-2 rule .

PS hit me up we aint far from lovelock

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"Btech117" post=385351 said:

Ok well I ordered the same stuff as in the video you showed me - It should be here tomorrow and will let yall know how it goes - was just asking if it was better to be in the fridge with out controller or in a hot cabinet. (both are out of temp range by a few deg.

Thanks for the help

Also seems like a stupid question but once i have a outlet for heating and an outlet for cooling - If its summer in nevada and hot outside I would want it on COOLING right? TO Turn ON when it goes above that temp right? Or would iust the same as Heating?

Better too cool than too warm.

Just like summer time here in TX, you just plug the freezer/fridge into the cool outlet and nothing into the warm outlet.

The STC-1000 is a true "set and forget" dual temperature controller. You wire it into a standard 2-plug outlet that you mount in some kind of project box (either homemade or bought at Radio Shack). One (cool) outlet is for the freezer/fridge. Into the other (warm) outlet, you plug some kind of small heater and then put that heater inside the freezer (we who live in the south rarely need this).

Set the target temp (in Celsius) on the STC-1000. Set the tolerance (default is +/-0.5*C). When the temp (as read by the sensor) climbs 0.5*C above the target, it powers up the cool outlet and keeps it energized until the temp drops to the target and then turns it off. Likewise with the warm outlet if it gets 0.5*C too cool. You tape the sensor on the side of the fermenter and place some kind of insulation like bubble wrap over top of it so that it reads the bucket temp and not the air.

STC-1000 build2

STC-1000 build

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"BigFloyd" post=385839 said:

"Btech117" post=385351 said:

Ok well I ordered the same stuff as in the video you showed me - It should be here tomorrow and will let yall know how it goes - was just asking if it was better to be in the fridge with out controller or in a hot cabinet. (both are out of temp range by a few deg.

Thanks for the help

Also seems like a stupid question but once i have a outlet for heating and an outlet for cooling - If its summer in nevada and hot outside I would want it on COOLING right? TO Turn ON when it goes above that temp right? Or would iust the same as Heating?

Better too cool than too warm.

Just like summer time here in TX, you just plug the freezer/fridge into the cool outlet and nothing into the warm outlet.

The STC-1000 is a true "set and forget" dual temperature controller. You wire it into a standard 2-plug outlet that you mount in some kind of project box (either homemade or bought at Radio Shack). One (cool) outlet is for the freezer/fridge. Into the other (warm) outlet, you plug some kind of small heater and then put that heater inside the freezer (we who live in the south rarely need this).

Set the target temp (in Celsius) on the STC-1000. Set the tolerance (default is +/-0.5*C). When the temp (as read by the sensor) climbs 0.5*C above the target, it powers up the cool outlet and keeps it energized until the temp drops to the target and then turns it off. Likewise with the warm outlet if it gets 0.5*C too cool. You tape the sensor on the side of the fermenter and place some kind of insulation like bubble wrap over top of it so that it reads the bucket temp and not the air.

STC-1000 build2

STC-1000 build

+1 stc-1000 is great. fwiw i use a papertowel between the tape and the probe to insulate from changes in air temp.

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Alot of comedy here for me so here I go. (Sarcasm) Very good info for temp controls, but the original question was, "Can yeast be added a day or two late?" How did this get into fermentation temp controls? Plus, how did this infiltrate the "New Brewers Frequently Asked Questions Category"? I leave you guys alone for a day or two & look what happens. (Note the sarcasm) This topic has ADD & needs Adderol Ale - The beer that keeps you focused. :gulp:

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It was me asking multipul questions - Went from the yeast to other things and just got carried away lol

Will Open a new topic on Controllers

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