Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
DIRT in my beer

Hops question

Recommended Posts

I notice that most of mr.b recipies use no more than two different hops. Is it okay to use more than two? Maybe say three, maybe even a hops boil with one and dry hop the other two? I just want to know before I try something and it turns out like sh*t. I really like going to the local beer store and trying new stuff. Some I like some I don't. I'm a BIG fan of brown ales. I Love Maduro nut brown ale. Has anyone ever tried it? I'd love to make something like it, but I really don't know how. Help please.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hop away. I am sure a few here will link the hop utilization graph ( I don't have it handy). I have an extract brew I use 7 hops with. There are people that do more. Brew it how you like it. :banana:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can absolutely use more than two hops. If you start looking at more advanced recipes, you'll see that have some really intricate hop schedules with multiple varieties of hops. With that in mind, you might want to start more basic. I'm not sure how long you've been brewing, but just using one hop at a time will help you learn what the different varieties will do for a beer. I don't mean to discourage you from doing your own thing...by all means its your beer and you should do your own thing. Just my humble opinion.

Happy brewing!

:chug:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have Columbus's Cascading Amber Ale conditioning for three weeks now. I'm not even gonna try it until Sept.
I want to brew Brown Eyed Girl next. It's basically the same recipe. I just want to see what the different hops and yeast do for it. What'd ya think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm by no means a hop or yeast expert so I can't tell you exactly how the different hops/yeast will effect it. But I can tell you that it WILL change it. Picking a recipe with the same base HME but different ingredients is a great way to see for yourself how it changes. They will likely be similar, but making them back to back will be very informative for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

September is far away. If you can wait that long, more power to you. As far as the two recipes being that similar, that is a good way to learn what changes in hops and yeast do to a beer. Like Ranger Danger said, you can hop as much as you like, but what if you taste a hop or yeast strain you don't like? How will you know? Doing those two similar recipes demonstrates how subtle changes can change a flavor profile. Sounds like you got it. Brew on!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim, I've been reading this forum for about two months before I actually started brewing. I've seen the same questions over and over. That's why I'm waiting till Sept. I, too, made the CAL, and it tasted like cider for five weeks. I was ready to dump it, then I tried one at eight weeks...and WOW!!! What a difference three weeks can make. I really wanna learn this stuff. That's why I figured Sept. would be a good starting point. I figured being that it is a more complex beer/recipe, it's probably gonna take a little more time to condition also. If I'm wrong tell me!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're on the right track. By September it should definitely be a fantastic beer. But unlike the CAL, it probably won't need that long to be drinkable. Don't get me wrong, longer is always better. But I always like to try the first at the 4-5 week mark, then one per week until it's where I like it. Of course, if you have the patience to wait it out, that's never a bad thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dude you suck!!! lmao!!! I don't have the patience!!! There're old enough right now. Oh and I want one so damn bad!!! I keep thinking of the taste at bottling. Mmmmm!!! I have Bud right now, so I can wait(at least I keep telling myself that). But seriously I almost threw away a descent beer(CAL), cuz I didn't wait long enough. Have you tried it/brewed it? I mean the Columbus Ale???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Waiting is definitely the hardest part of brewing. Getting a healthy pipeline going is the only way to make that waiting easier so get to brewing! I have not made the Columbus Ale. I'm just guessing that it will be decent by 4-5 weeks. Typically the only ones that need longer are high ABV (6-7 percent on up).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have not brewed the CAL, but from reading I think it may take some time, so that is why it took a bit.


I have just bottled 4 batches in the past two days and also just brewed 2 more batches tonight...just finished.

I also will be brewing two tomorrow (aztec and c pils with added DME and saaz for both)
I need to get to know hops myself, but I know I need to experience each hops myself.

One at a time, and go by the pop and favs and start from there.

I will say, I am not a hoppy person, but I keep in mind from what I learned here....
Hops need to be added to cut the sweet and malt flavor.
The higher the malt, the higher the hops to counter.

So if you take any MB recipes, and add hops...not only will you change flavor
but it will become hoppy.
If you add DME or LME or such, you would been more hops or will have more malty.

More malt + More hops = same/similar flav but more body and pronounced depth of flavor.
You can also get complex .... lol from the hop withdrawal you are having.. you should know!!! haha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you really want to learn how different yeasts and different hops affect a beer it will take great patience. The best way to do that is as follows:
1. Brew the beer
2. brew the beer with a different yeast
3. choose which yeast you like better in that particular beer after tasting each when they are done. Now you know how the yeast affects the beer.
4. brew that beer with a different hop. This could be single hop or adding the different hop to what you are already using. Either will teach you how that hop affected your beer.
5. brew that beer with a different hop yet.

You see really learning what these ingredients do takes a long time. If you try changing the yeast and adding several hops all at the same time you may come out with a remarkable beer, or you may not be too happy with it, in either case you will have no clue if it was the yeast or the hops, nor will you know which of the hops or hop combinations you don't like, etc.

I have been doing this stuff for almost 4 years and am just now getting to the point where I can identify what grains are in a commercial beer when I taste it well enough to make one very similar to it. I have done a lot of particular beers and tweaked them one ingredient at a time to learn what that ingredient does. And to learn just what I do and don't like in my beer. I consider myself an intermediate brewer now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"DIRT in my beer" post=384763 said:

Maybe say three, maybe even a hops boil with one and dry hop the other two?

Just make sure if you boil you are only boiling the UME and not the HME. Otherwise, you will alter the profile of the HME.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sounds like ya are ready for the dark path of all grain. I have on more than one occasion used 4 or 5 different hops and over a pound's worth to boot!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maduro Clone 1

http://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/maduro-clone


Maduro 2

http://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/winstons-maduro-herfest


Based on what I see....
I would suggest getting a 3Lb container of Maris Otter from Northern Brewer
Chocolate looks like it belongs and also some Brown malt or darker Cara malt...maybe a CaraBohemian
Goldings and Fuggle seem to be the hops of choice
Both use: YEAST STRAIN: 1450 | Denny's Favorite 50

This terrific all-round yeast can be used for almost any beer style, and is a mainstay of one of our local homebrewers, Mr. Denny Conn. It is unique in that it produces a big mouthfeel and accentuates the malt, caramel, or fruit character of a beer without being sweet or under-attenuated.
..............if you can't get the Wyeast 1450, I hear the best White Labs sub is going to be WLP051...California V

Definitely Oatmeal...and I'd go on the higher side with it too.

You could hit up Wayne...head Brewer over at Cigar City:
wayne@cigarcitybrewing.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Christ872, You are the man!!! Thanx so much. I will probably need some help when ready to brew, though. Can I call on ya for some assistance?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...