Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Jeffross1968

Wow...is this mold?

Recommended Posts

After brewing I placed my 2 gallon keg in a cool dark spot in my house, and didn't look at it until today, 2 weeks later. I found white and green floating chunks on the top. Sure looks like mold. What do you think?

001_zpsd9f2db10.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was frankly afraid to taste it. Smells normal. I just don't have enough experience to tell you if it smells off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I tasted it...tastes flat and maybe a little off. I have only brewed one batch previously, so I don't have a good reference...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm no expert on this and have been very lucky so far but you can try sanitizing a strainer and slowly and carefully, skim this off without aerating the wort.
If it smells ok, it's possible that a longer than normal conditioning will settle the taste out. You've got nothing to lose at this point but a little extra time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What exactly did you brew? Did you add anything into it? For example, certain products contain fat and don't belong in beer - chocolate bars, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a Mr. Beer variety pack refill Pale Ale. Adding nothing that didn't come with it except for a Mr. Beer booster pack. Went exactly by the simple instructions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do have to say that the variety pack is probably 2 years old. Has been in a dark cupboard during that whole time, unopened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That wouldn't matter. Nor if the yeast was old. Points to an infection of some type.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It still might be saved if you are willing to bottle and let sit a while. Like I said, you've got nothing more to loose at this point. If it smells good and has no real bad taste, longer conditioning might very well make this a drinkable brew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'll try it. Like you said, nothing to lose. If it is an "infection", how was that likely to have occurred?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

question for the experts:

i was looking at images of beer infections and saw one that looked similar. i followed the thread to the forum and the general consensus was that the person dry hopped. hops break down and release hop oil (?) and that was what they said it was.


since the can of hopped malt extract was 2 years old... could it be that the hop content in the can broke down and made this mess?

just curious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting question zorak1066. Also, are there any health concerns with me drinking this stuff, if it is mold? I strained it and bottled it. I'm going to let it sit for a few weeks before trying, but can the mold or whatever this infection is, hurt me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hop oil that got fuzzy? I wouldn't think so, with dry hopping, you'll also get lots of leaf, or particles, which could look odd, but not that odd.

Infections occur for a million reasons. Some very hard to control. Most would be under your control. Sanitize everything post boil. Make sure your hme gets plenty of contact time with 180*+ before chilling to sanitize it. Then chill quickly, pitch, and cover it up. Leave it in a clean, non drafty place, at the right temps, and don't perv your beer. (no opening lid, no sticking in spoons, no taking taste). When your done, clean the heck out of everything. Remember sanitizing and cleaning are too different steps.

Some good starting points!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It can be anything and is very hard to tell at this point. I've known people who had both a bad smell and bad taste but not overly nasty that let them age and they were drinkable. Might not be the best beer but it was much improved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DO NOT strain!! You don't want to break it up and knock stuff into your beer.

Rack, or bottle from underneath it,,,and don't stretch it out to the very last bottle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's safe,,,may just taste awful.

I wouldn't wait another two weeks,,,if it's had two weeks already, bottle quickly, let it carb, and drink pretty quickly. No reason to let the infection take hold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i would think that if it smells like beer and tastes like beer... and you strained off the gack... (or siphoned off from below) and if it doesnt RE-appear in the bottles... you should be ok.

next time try to use fresh ingredients. using old crap makes crap beer usually.

what you can do to play it safe: after it ages and carbs and conditions (4weeks..probably 6 to be safe) pour a glass. if it doesnt have any more crap floating in it you should be ok. try a couple sips. if it tastes ok, give yourself a little time to see if you get stomach upset. if not...

i drank beer that had a lactobacter infection. i had nasty grey milky bubbles on the suface when i went to bottle. it ended up being nasty , sourish so i had to 'fix' it with adding orange flavored powder to each glass. i didnt die. got some nasty gas though. the last bottles i drank almost.. i say almost ... tasted ok.

i think the only really nasty infections you would definitely NOT want to drink are acetobacter and ecoli.

acetobacter eats all the alcohol you just made and poops out acidic vinegary stuff. it can burn your mouth i think.

ecoli - if the beer smells like sh*t... dont drink it.

but im still learning too.. .perhaps the experts can shed more light on this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"zorak1066" post=386057 said:

i think the only really nasty infections you would definitely NOT want to drink are acetobacter and ecoli.

acetobacter eats all the alcohol you just made and poops out acidic vinegary stuff. it can burn your mouth i think.

ecoli - if the beer smells like sh*t... dont drink it.

This. Most infections that could kill you or make you sick don't survive in the alcoholic environment of beer. It probably won't be easy to drink but you should not have any ill health effects. I say "should not" because I am not an expert, just what I have read from other sources.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had one batch with a vinegary taste. Didn't burn anything, but the overriding vinegar taste may it undrinkable because that was the lingering taste on each mouthful. I toss probably a dozen bottles so far, every now and then I open one and sniff hoping that it's gone. It's not... :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If done carefully, I see no reason not to strain. Why leave that crap in there longer than needed. With a small, sanitized strainer, taking your time, a good bit of it can be removed.
Just one man's opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

possibly knocking spores and flagella into the rest of your beer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But it's already in there! And, simply moving the LBK to bottle will move them around.
If it's truly infected, chances are it won't be something anyone will want to drink. Some infections don't greatly affect the taste and smell and time is your friend. But, since he says it doesn't smell bad and only has a slight off taste, I would think it can be saved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with Paul on this one. Remember a sour is a drinkable infected beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you take any notes on brew day? What was the wort temp when you pitched your yeast into the LBK?

Did the "off" taste seem soapy, sour or what?

Have you taken any gravity readings?

Have moved/ disturbed the LBK since you discovered this? Is there trub in the bottom of the LBK?

Old HME can make crappy beer that tastes soapy.

If you pitched to hot and the yeast was already old you might have killed it and you have a collection of all kinds of microscopic critters growing in there because it is not beer it is old wort.

If you already added some sugar and bottled it put it in some kind of strong container in a location where bottle bombs won't hurt anyone. If it is in PET bottles check them every few days to make sure the caps or bottom are not bulging. If you see bulging twist the caps enough to hear a fssst sound and see how much they foam up then tighten and repeat.


Oh yeah and get some fresh ingredients (probably including a new LBK).

Good Luck. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Brewbirds" post=386079 said:

Did you take any notes on brew day? What was the wort temp when you pitched your yeast into the LBK?

Did the "off" taste seem soapy, sour or what?

Have you taken any gravity readings?

Have moved/ disturbed the LBK since you discovered this? Is there trub in the bottom of the LBK?

Old HME can make crappy beer that tastes soapy.

If you pitched to hot and the yeast was already old you might have killed it and you have a collection of all kinds of microscopic critters growing in there because it is not beer it is old wort.

If you already added some sugar and bottled it put it in some kind of strong container in a location where bottle bombs won't hurt anyone. If it is in PET bottles check them every few days to make sure the caps or bottom are not bulging. If you see bulging twist the caps enough to hear a fssst sound and see how much they foam up then tighten and repeat.


Oh yeah and get some fresh ingredients (probably including a new LBK).

Good Luck. :cheers:

A new LBK? This is only the 2nd time I've used it. Would I not be able to just clean the thing really good with bleach or something? Yikes...

It tasted more sour than anything. Didn't seem soapy. As for taking notes...no. Just followed the basic instructions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot as been said and all true...

Opinions on straining vary, but since it's already in there, I suppose you could go either way. i would be inclined to rack/bottle out from under it.

What concerns me is this:(and this is just my ramblings on the matter, right, wrong or indifferent)

There seems to be some greenish mold on top of some of the organic substrate that is floating on top of the beer in your picture.

Mold is generally not a good thing in it's natural form.

I would want to confirm that the beer fermented out to at least 2% ABV, or more in fact would be better.

Less than that and some really bad bacteria and mold can survive and can be bad for you.

SIDE NOTE: I bottled 5 gallons of great, non-infected beer about four weeks ago...

BUT: I put the glass carboy aside to clean later and forgot about it... Wish I had taken a piture when I found it yesterday, before I saw this thread...

Anyway, and maybe this is a testament to the protective attributes of hops, or the 5.9% ABV of the brew, but anyway, there was NO SIGN of either mold or bacteria, no foul smells and no change in olor of the yeast/trub, reaining bit of beer on top, nor the hops and hop sacks from the dry hop process.

In fact, I actually considered washing the yeast to experiment with later... But I didn't.

POINT IS: If I had no mold after four weeks at room temp with a full carboy full of headspace... I would be a little concerned about the quality of the fermentation on your batch...

Just sayin'... It might be fine...

By any chance, did you take a hydrometer reading before and after fermentation to calculate the ABV?

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I don't know if this points to it being bad, but I just had one explode in my bedroom, 1 week after bottling. I carefully carried the rest outside and left it on the porch till morning. Not sure how I'll dispose of the rest of it, but I don't think I can trust it at this point...ugh...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wouldnt 2 year old fromunda yeast be practically dead?

what might (insert speculation here) have happened:

you made the kit. you pitched dead yeast into it. while the lid was off mold spores and / or bacteria and/or wild yeast got into it somehow.

time passes.. mold/bacteria grows unchecked. wild yeast tries to ferment but doesnt do a very good job. ( a hydrometer reading at this point wouldve been interesting....)

you strain it off the mold into bottles... essentially under-fermented... add priming sugar. the wild yeast goes 'hey! no competition! lets party!' and produces too much co2... which causes your bottles to blow up.

if it were me i would just trash the whole batch. chalk it up as a learning experience and start over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"zorak1066" post=387957 said:

wouldnt 2 year old fromunda yeast be practically dead?

No reason it would be dead based on age. Lots of posts about people using yeast from years ago. Stored properly, it will last a long time. Nottingham yeast as an example loses 25% per year if stored in the fridge, but 50% a year stored at room temp.

So even 3 year old yeast can work fine. I've used 2 1/2 yr old fromunda just fine.

Don't know what happened to the batch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...