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bpbpthomas

what happens when you pitch the yeast too hot?

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I haven't brewed in a while, and i was going on autopilot and without thinking I pitched the yeast almost immediately after pouring the just-below-boiling wort into the cold keg.

What's the result of pitching the yeast above 80 or so degrees? (This was probably around 150-180 degrees!)
Does it make it bitter?
It's supposed to be a malty English ale; not really a hoppy recipe. What's the potential result?

Thanks!

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If you pitched at 150, your yeast is dead. Go out and get a new pack as soon as you can.

If you pitched at 80, off flavors potentially.

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I'm sorry. I would have responded sooner but I just got back in from lowering my flag to half-mast in honor of your dead yeast.

Go buy some new yeast and be more careful this time. ;)

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Actually, the cold water must have brought it down more than I thought, because there's fermentation happening - I've got a nice layer starting to form on top.

Now, what about off-flavors? Am I screwed, flavor-wise?

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"bpbpthomas" post=386565 said:


Now, what about off-flavors? Am I screwed, flavor-wise?

There's no way to know what kind of off-flavors you'll get or just how bad they'll be without having some idea of the wort temp when you pitched and how long it stayed hot/warm. At what temp do you have it now?

A thermometer is an essential part of your brewing equipment for this very reason. Pitch and ferment temps have a huge impact on the quality of your brew.

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The yeast may have stressed a bit in the initial stages of fermentation and may have produced some off flavors. Time will tell and so will the tasting but you made beer!

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Hey you may even like the way the beer tastes, but I wouldn't use it as a guide to how a properly fermented beer would taste.

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i did this too closer to 80 not 150 tho....i put in 66 degree basement right away even had a fan pointed at it for a bit at first but as of now its been bout 11 days

in the first day i had alot of foam then within next day or so foam when down to almost all the way and at this point wort is still pretty cloudy but hopefully the batch turns out without too much of an off flavor if any :cheer:

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As was noted, if you follow Mr. Beer's instructions, the wort isn't anywhere near 150 degrees. Nor does it need to be cooled - Mr. Beer's instructions take care of that.

You boiled 4 cups of water.
You added your can of HME. Mr. Beer's standard refills are 1.87 lbs, eyeballing them I'd guess that's 2 cups. It's at room temp, figure 70 degrees.
You add that to 4 quarts of cold tap water (some use refrigerated water).

128 oz of 50 degree water + 16 oz of 70 degree liquid plus 32 oz of 212 degree water doesn't equal a temp that high. That's why you see fermentation.

If you follow Mr. Beer's instructions, you get beer fermented just fine.

Some of us add LME or DME or steep grains, using more water, and therefore we cool the wort in a sink filled with water and ice. Or we make 5 gallon batches that might use 2.5 or 3 gallons of water to create a very hot wort. Then we cool that done in the sink before combining with a gallon of cold water.

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