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jbags

Why the change to 3-4 conditioning?

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I'm newly returned to the community after about 2.5 years away. In that time I've graduated to carboys, all grain brewing, and kegging.- still have the LBK but its definitely dusty and feeling unloved!

I notice everyone is telling the noobs to go 3 fermenter and 4 conditioning now. 2-2-2 was the party line last I logged in....why the change? As a noob I made good stuff with base MB kits adhering to 2-2-2., and even now I rarely ferment longer than 15 days bc most all ales will hit FG well before 21 days. Time is time and 6 total weeks is plenty of time for MBs low to med gravity kits no matter how you break it down.

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mostly it's 'cause the noobs don't have a hydrometer so 3 weeks, it's a safe bet it's done. but 2 weeks conditioning/carbing just not enough

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Actually, there isn't that much of a change.
We have found that 99.99% of all beers finish fermenting at the 21 day mark. Without a hydrometer reading, one just doesn't know for sure. Some are good at one week, others at two weeks. But how would you know? No test, "3" weeks.
The 2/2 part is still the same:
It takes about 2 weeks to carbinate
And
It takes about 2 weeks at an additional room temp to "clean up its act" and get rid of the "green" taste on average.
All this is to help the noobz. Once the get the basics and learn and feel comfortable with the process, then they can do it the way it works best for them.

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I am still doing things the way I was taught when I started here 3.5 years ago. Works for me.

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jbags~

I think...in principle...you're right. Many beers do ferment in the 2 weeks. Definitely not the 7 days Mr. Beer suggests. But the SUGGESTION of 3 weeks is a blanket to make sure all fermentation is complete, all clean-up is also resolved and to give the brewers the best chance to ensure they're getting the best quality they can.

I would say probably 85-90% of the beers will be good to roll in 14 days...but why not be 100% sure and go 21 days (or something close to that). As MOST...not all but most....Mr. Beer brewers are newer-to-brewing folks, I believe there have been a lot more people erring on the side of caution and being pleasantly surprised with the end result.

If you're hitting your FG in 15 days...why let it sit?? Certainly no need to extend it. But you've also extended a long ways beyond where most folks here are at in their brewing hobby. Safer than sorry is the preferred approach around here.

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Ok thanks guys. The extra fermentation week makes sense the way you explain it.

All about makin life easier on the noobs!

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For the "4" part of 3-4, the prevailing wisdom is 2 weeks of carbonating + 2 weeks of additional conditioning (the "-2-2" part of 2-2-2), but one really doesn't do anything between the 2 two-week periods, so it is just as easily called 4 weeks.

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I thought we went to the 3-4 schedule because it was easier to build up and maintain a pipe line.

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"Chuck N ™" post=387515 said:

I thought we went to the 3-4 schedule because it was easier to build up and maintain a pipe line.

:pinch:

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By saying "4" rather than "+2+2" removes confusion. A lot of the newer brewers were taking the 2 week conditioning time to mean that they should go in the fridge and "lager" which we know just puts the yeasties to sleep.

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My first introduction to the 2-2-2 method was from the Mr. Beer Fans website. In that version 2-2-2 means 2 weeks fermenting at 65-75 degrees, 2 weeks carbonating in the bottles at 65-75 degrees, and 2 weeks cold conditioning at fridge temps, so I can understand the confusion and this method is better then the original Mr. Beer instructions there was still a chance of having unfinished fermenting beer or under carbonated beer or just your beer.

The first three in 3-4 is increased from 2 to make sure that fermentation is complete without a hydrometer measurement. It is all about making sure you have a good beer brewing experience. For the four in 3-4-1, patience is usually rewarded. In my experience my beer tastes better the longer I have aged it.(with the exception of some VERY hop intensive beer) I sometimes extended this to 6 weeks at room temperature for high ABV beers or beers with lots of fruit, spices or adjuncts.

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I go 3 weeks in the fermenter and 4 weeks in the bottle at room temp. That's what I learned here and it's worked fine for me. Even with a hydrometer, I don't really even take a reading until the day before I bottle. I know it's done fermenting at that point, so I don't need to take multiple readings. Just one to record the final gravity.

With that said, I pretty much always try a bottle at 3 weeks. If it tastes good (and it pretty much always does) I consider it ready to go and throw a few more in the fridge. I probably wont drink more than those 3 before I hit 4 weeks anyway. Then they generally just improve a bit each week.

I actually tried a wheat beer at 2 weeks yesterday and it was not bad at all. I'll give it another week before I really consider it ready to drink, but it certainly is not bad at 2 weeks.

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getting more confused... lol I thought 2 weeks minimum ferm.... 2 weeks botted all from 65 to 75 degrees then 2 weeks or more to condition at 50 to 70 degrees. cept my Aztec which 8 weeks condition was recommended. then in the fridge for 2 days at least.

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"Foothiller" post=387477 said:

For the "4" part of 3-4, the prevailing wisdom is 2 weeks of carbonating + 2 weeks of additional conditioning (the "-2-2" part of 2-2-2), but one really doesn't do anything between the 2 two-week periods, so it is just as easily called 4 weeks.


What? On day 15 I flip a switch in my cellar and go from carbing mode to conditioning mode. :chug:

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"windowpane" post=387583 said:

getting more confused... lol I thought 2 weeks minimum ferm.... 2 weeks botted all from 65 to 75 degrees then 2 weeks or more to condition at 50 to 70 degrees. cept my Aztec which 8 weeks condition was recommended. then in the fridge for 2 days at least.

if you got a hydrometer you can check at 2 weeks wait 3 days check again it ain't moved, bottle. but if you bottle with out this information, you could experience bottle bombs. so if no hydrometer wait 3 weeks. better safe than waste beer.

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"yankeedag" post=387517 said:

"Chuck N ™" post=387515 said:

I thought we went to the 3-4 schedule because it was easier to build up and maintain a pipe line.

:pinch:

:evil:

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"gophers6" post=387584 said:

"Foothiller" post=387477 said:

For the "4" part of 3-4, the prevailing wisdom is 2 weeks of carbonating + 2 weeks of additional conditioning (the "-2-2" part of 2-2-2), but one really doesn't do anything between the 2 two-week periods, so it is just as easily called 4 weeks.


What? On day 15 I flip a switch in my cellar and go from carbing mode to conditioning mode. :chug:

You found a switch to use? I would try a spell like Harry Potter, but can never remember what it would be.

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"gophers6" post=387584 said:

"Foothiller" post=387477 said:

For the "4" part of 3-4, the prevailing wisdom is 2 weeks of carbonating + 2 weeks of additional conditioning (the "-2-2" part of 2-2-2), but one really doesn't do anything between the 2 two-week periods, so it is just as easily called 4 weeks.


What? On day 15 I flip a switch in my cellar and go from carbing mode to conditioning mode. :chug:

Please provide us a picture of the magical switch...I am engineering savvy and want to try and build one...puh-leeeeeeez

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Wow, it can be explosive if there's remaining sugar, so worrying because of low LBK fermentation temp. near 65F~66F.
Arr.. I should buy a hydrometer right now!!

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It would depend tremendously on the yeast what temps are too low and what are not. But in general 65 isn't too low for most... I've had acetaldehyde problems with DownUnda when fermented at 62 or lower, but I've not had stuck/incomplete fermentations.

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