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Celtics76

Priming Sugar - St. Patrick's Irish Stout

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So I brewed my first batch back in Feb - St. Pat's Irish Stout with a full package of booster. I fermented for 4 weeks, part of the reason I left in the keg so long was due to the fact that I couldn't get the temp above 65 (instruction call for 68-76) so I thought the extra time would help.

When I bottled, I primed half the batch with 1/2 Domino's Dot per bottle (2.58g sugar I believe per dot), 1/4 with 3/4 Dot, and the rest with a full Dot.

The bottles with half a dot came out great, the rest tasted cidery. What I don't get is it seems most folks use a full dot when priming the Irish Stout, which I think only amounts to half a teaspoon. My best ones only had a quarter teaspoon if I'm doing the math right.

Does the fact that I couldn't get fermentation temps in adequate range have anything to do with the cidery taste of some of the bottles? Or does it have something to do with how much priming sugar I used?

Thanks! I just brewed my next batch and will be bottling in a couple weeks.

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According to Domino's website, a dot is 1/2 teaspoon. So you used 1/4 teaspoon, 3/8 teaspoon, and 1/2 teaspoon in the various bottles - as you noted.

None of those amounts account for cidery results.

Your temp ranges were fine. Much better than if you went to 76.

You don't address how much time in the bottle. Did you wait a full 4 weeks or longer (Stouts often take longer)? Were the ones that were cidery younger than the ones that were not?

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I waited about 3 weeks in the bottle before trying my first one. I bottled way back in March, and I actually had one (3/8 teaspoon) as recently as last weekend and it was still cidery, though I think aging it helped a bit. All of my bottles that only used 1/2 Domino's Dot came out good. I find that strange because that seems to be less than recommended.

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I have an unrelated question - except that it's also about an Irish Stout.

I'm going to be batch priming this weekend and then kegging into a 3-gallon keg. (Like the 'real ales' in England, which are keg conditioned with priming agent, and then dispense from the keg with the internal carbonation, rather than attaching a CO2 tank.)

But I'm looking for a way to get a more creamy carbonation -- I generally just use table sugar, which gives my lighter beers a crisp carbonation that's perfect for them, but for a richer, creamier beer, I'd like more of a creamy carbonation. (I know Guinness does this by carbonating with nitrogen rather than CO2.)

But does anyone have any suggestions for alternate priming sugars that will give a more creamy carbonation? Should I just use a little less?

I've read that mixing in some oatmeal into the brew will increase the creaminess in the end, which is well and good for my next batch, but too late for the fermentation for this batch.  Any suggestions?

(Sorry to side-track this thread; I didn't think it was necessary to start a second thread called "priming sugar for an Irish Stout" even though my question is slightly different in nature.)

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CO2 is CO2, the creaminess has been 99% taken care of by the time you add the priming sugar.  Can switching up the prime change things?,,,,yes,,,,,will you notice? I doubt it.

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I know this does not answer your original question, but Simpsons Golden Naked Oats adds a great creaminess  and body to my brown ales and stouts. Actually I am thinking about using it in other styles as well. 4 to 8 ounces per 2.5 gallon batch

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Hey Fishybrewer do you add the oats while strirring the wort then  adding it to the LBK for the full  fermentation?

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