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Sparrow

centennial blonde mash temp too high

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so today I try my hand at BIAB with a 2.5 gallon centennial blonde, but mash temp was 162 after an hour. should have figured 5# of grain would not drop 170 degree strike water as much as 10#.


any thoughts on what I can expect from the Borg


thanks

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Your beer will likely have a very thick, rich mouthfeel due to the mash. The higher the mash temp, the less fermentable sugars will be extracted from the grains. This will make the final product sweeter, not as dry, so your FG will not be near what the expected FG would be.

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Some things to do in the future if you need to reduce the temps is some cold water and ice and constant stirring.
Even when I do 15 lbs of grain that is room temperature, I never go above 160 or so. What did you use that told you to start with your water so high? I've found that for me, even Beersmith isn't accurate with my mash pot but only after a few BIAB's was I able to get to know my pot and what temperature I should use.
Some people are luckier with software and hit it on the nose but that's never worked accurately for me.

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Thanks for the replies philm00x and BL.

Not sure why I was thinking 170 for the strike temp, maybe I got it confused with the sparge temp...

Wonder if there is anything I can do at his point to dry it out some, like adding sugar? Probably not a good idea though.

Guess I'll pitch the yeast and see where the FG ends up.

Thanks again.

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Can he pitch a bit of Nottingham or champagne yeast to get it "dried out" a bit more?

Seems like I remember a thread on that from a while back but vaguely.

My co-brewer got some Nottingham to keep on hand for stuck fermentations based on something he read but don't know if it was on the :borg: .

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BB, the recipe actually calls for Nottingham, which is what I pitched.


thanks

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You can use a strong fermenting yeast like Nottingham, but remember, it will only gobble up whatever malt sugars are available that they can metabolize (maltose, predominantly).

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BB I told you about those other yeasts for your saison. Because extract is not as fermentable as an all grain wort. As Phil stated this is going to be one sweet wort. Any chance you can bump the total volume up. If so I would add a table sugar solution to it, perhaps with some steep roasted grains. This will dry the beer out by diluting the amount of unfermentables out a bit. The champagne yeast will help too, as it can metabolize some of the more complex sugars. There is an enzyme that might help. Forgot what is called saw it at the LHBS a few what feels like life times ago

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Thanks for the link Sam, bookmarked!

I'm really wanting to get this one right, so I'm thinking when the current batch has reached whatever FG it settles on, I'm going to re-brew (at 150 mash temp this time) and pitch on top of half the current yeast cake, and wash the remainder so I can have some Nottingham on hand.

I'll need to review the washing threads, but I've never pitched on top of a yeast cake in an LBK, any one have any pointers?

Thanks

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