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Midget

Fermenting temps

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Hello again i just started another batch of Bewitched red ale and added 1 lb dry unhopped malt dark. my question is its really hot in the last week ive got two thermoters and one reads 70 deg and 1 says 80deg is this a safe temp to ferment also i added half of the booster bag i really want this stuff to ferment i put a wet towel over the keg ill wet it twice a day what do you guys think? im using mr beer yeast that came with the bewitched also the area im using is under kitchen sink

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Hmmm, one says 70, and the other 80? I think you need a third opinion, 'cause it seems unlikely that they are both right...assuming that you're taking the reading at the same location. The bottom line is that 70 is a great temp to ferment at, but 80 is not.

Your wet towel plan sounds like a good one. Lots of people have good results with a similar set up. My advice is to work on finding a way to get consistent temperature readings that you can trust. Do that, and you'll be well on your way to brewing good beer!

:chug:

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i went to walmart and bought a digital room temp guage and it read 78 deg in storage area

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Midget wrote:

i went to walmart and bought a digital room temp guage and it read 78 deg in storage area

Then start using the wet tshirt or wet towel method as soon as possible.

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Dr. Dink wrote:

The wet t-shirt or towel method works great on the wife too. ;)

:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

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Dr. Dink wrote:

The wet t-shirt or towel method works great on the wife too. ;)

Thanks. I'll remember that when I see her.

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I've read on this board that the temp in the keg goes up significantly during the first few days of fermenting. So should we be putting it somewhere where the temp is 65 or so and then moving it to a place where its around 70 after a few days?

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norman1 wrote:

I've read on this board that the temp in the keg goes up significantly during the first few days of fermenting. So should we be putting it somewhere where the temp is 65 or so and then moving it to a place where its around 70 after a few days?


I don't think it would be neccessary to move it, don't you think the yeast will work at 65? Slower, maybe, but thats not neccessarly a bad thing.

I have noticed that after a few days of fermentation the temp on my brew-o-meter drops a few degrees, interesting.

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Sham Addams wrote:

norman1 wrote:

I've read on this board that the temp in the keg goes up significantly during the first few days of fermenting. So should we be putting it somewhere where the temp is 65 or so and then moving it to a place where its around 70 after a few days?


I don't think it would be neccessary to move it, don't you think the yeast will work at 65? Slower, maybe, but thats not neccessarly a bad thing.

I have noticed that after a few days of fermentation the temp on my brew-o-meter drops a few degrees, interesting.

Yep. I brew at 65-68 all the way through. Works great for me.

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ok guys ve tried my Bewitched red ale and i must say it turned out good but im wondering why it tasted a tad sweet like newcastle? I hope thats the taste of it. I started second batch but used dme lite dark it it let itferment for 12 days it tasted really good before bottling but that first batch why a tad sweet? im asking cause i want the second batch to turn out great

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Midget wrote:

ok guys ve tried my Bewitched red ale and i must say it turned out good but im wondering why it tasted a tad sweet like newcastle? I hope thats the taste of it. I started second batch but used dme lite dark it it let itferment for 12 days it tasted really good before bottling but that first batch why a tad sweet? im asking cause i want the second batch to turn out great

You don't say how long it was carbing or how long it's been conditioning. Many beers will have some lingering sweet taste for weeks. GOOD beer needs to condition after a couple of weeks carbing for at LEAST a couple of weeks and months is usually better.

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Im sorry it carbed for ten days witch it has great carb its been in fridge for two weeks actualy its a little over carbed

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Midget wrote:

Im sorry it carbed for ten days witch it has great carb its been in fridge for two weeks actualy its a little over carbed

Hmmm. What COULD have happened, if you think it's overcarbed and still sweet is that it wasn't done fermenting. That's happened to me in the past. This means when you add carbing sugar there are still malt sugars left in the beer even though you may not have been able to taste them (This is why everyone here recommends a hydrometer). This will do two things. It will overcarb your beer and the residual sweetness will take longer to(and may never totally) go away. It CAN also lead to bottle bombs if there was a LOT of residual malt sugar.

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If I am reading this right, you bottled at 12 days, at least the second batch? When I look back over all my notes, 17 days keeps popping up over and over. So I would agree with McGrew, I think you may have bottled just a little early.

Also, keep in mind you're comparing a home baked product to a very processed commercial product, and beer is, after all, fermented sugar water...so, "a tad sweet" is about the same thing as "more flavorful", and may just be really good. My experience has been that MB beers are sweeter than average grocery store fare; and I think the Bewitched Red is one of the most mellow (sweetest) mixes they make. If you want something less sweet, either add more hops, or go for something like the High Country Canadian Draft, or if you want something with real bite, the American Devil IPA.

Finally, I and many others do most of our aging at room temp, and only stick them in the fridge a few days before drinking. This may help it mellow out sooner.

Welcome, and good luck.

David

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SiriusDG wrote:

If I am reading this right, you bottled at 12 days, at least the second batch? When I look back over all my notes, 17 days keeps popping up over and over. So I would agree with McGrew, I think you may have bottled just a little early.

Also, keep in mind you're comparing a home baked product to a very processed commercial product, and beer is, after all, fermented sugar water...so, "a tad sweet" is about the same thing as "more flavorful", and may just be really good. My experience has been that MB beers are sweeter than average grocery store fare; and I think the Bewitched Red is one of the most mellow (sweetest) mixes they make. If you want something less sweet, either add more hops, or go for something like the High Country Canadian Draft, or if you want something with real bite, the American Devil IPA.

Finally, I and many others do most of our aging at room temp, and only stick them in the fridge a few days before drinking. This may help it mellow out sooner.

Welcome, and good luck.

David

I just noticed the other day that my Beersmith recommends bottling and immediately going to 'aging' at 52 degrees. I may try this with the stout I'm brewing today just for giggles. It will extend the carbing time of course...

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Well, yeah, if you have somewhere that is 52 degrees...but when your choices are 35 and 75... :angry:

David

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SiriusDG wrote:

Well, yeah, if you have somewhere that is 52 degrees...but when your choices are 35 and 75... :angry:

David


:( I know. I wasn't braggin' honestly. BTW. I just brewed a German Light Lager(which is really an ale) I'm testing at this moment. Sort of reminds me of my first MB brew. A little TOO light for my taste. Not a lot there. Okay lawnmower beer I guess. If I mowed lawns.

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What's the highest temp you would condition at? I have nowhere in the house below 73 so I go straight to the fridge.

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My beers (all Ales) age in the brew room, which is 72-76 on any given day. Once they are in the bottle, and this is just my opinion, they are way less sensitive to temp. I would not store them near any direct source of heat, or light; but in the dark, with a good breeze from the cieling fan, they age just fine in there.

David

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