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Brewbirds

Mash in question

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My grains were very cold to the touch when I was fixing to start my mash so I brought the strike water up to 165 instead of 160 and oops my mash in temp was 162.

I left the lid off when I put the kettle into the oven (155) for the mash to try and equalize the temp.


It's almost time to pull out so I don't know what the mash out temp will be yet but was wondering what that high mash in temp might have done/ will do?

Thanks

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Higher temps give you less fermentable sugars , and a fuller bodied beer, or something like that.

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I wasn't trying to mash higher the initial temp just went to high.

Mash out temp was targeted 155 so I hope I 'm good.

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Did your mash temp ever get below 155 at all, or start at 162 and end at 155?
What was your original intent for mashing temp?

To begin and end at or above 155 would most certainly produce almost exclusively non-fermentable sugars. Now that would make a beer I might enjoy, very malty and sweet.

I don't think 162 is high enough to kill the enzymes, so that's good. I believe that happens about 168 degrees.

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"Joechianti" post=389652 said:

Did your mash temp ever get below 155 at all, or start at 162 and end at 155?
What was your original intent for mashing temp?

To begin and end at or above 155 would most certainly produce almost exclusively non-fermentable sugars. Now that would make a beer I might enjoy, very malty and sweet.

I don't think 162 is high enough to kill the enzymes, so that's good. I believe that happens about 168 degrees.

My temps never got below 155, I use the "keep warm" feature on the oven set at 155 for the mash.

Our intended was the 155 for 60 minutes.

The grain went into the mash at 162 accidentally because it came out of the freezer ahead of time but still felt pretty cold so I added five degrees to the water to compensate (my bad) for that thinking I would get the 155 I was after.

As I said it did mash out at 155 but I wasn't sure what would happen if I dropped the grain into water that hot even if it did eventually cool back down to target.

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You should be fine then. What kind of beer is it you were mashing? I know every beer of yours I've tried so far has been very good, so if you always mash at 155, then it's working. I'm a throwback to the Neanderthal era, so I like to step mash, hoping to get ever drop of both fermentable and non fermentable sugar I can coax out of them grains. But I don't think many people do that anymore.

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+1000 Screwy!! You always use the actual grain temp and weight. I take my grains temp after milling (mill my own) to calculate the mash. So glad I do not have to do that BS anymore :laugh: :laugh:

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"haerbob3" post=389672 said:

+1000 Screwy!! You always use the actual grain temp and weight. I take my grains temp after milling (mill my own) to calculate the mash. So glad I do not have to do that BS anymore :laugh: :laugh:

Grain temp?

This is the first time time they felt cold to the touch enough that I made an adjustment.

The obvious answer should have been let them sit out longer but I'm curious about taking the temp.

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There is a little box right where it says grain temp. Tell Andy it is his mash profile. Please do not mind me very tired. Just finish an 80 some hour pay period.

Any way you enter the grain temp and the strike temp is calculated for you

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