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Kealia

Don't fear a quick fermentation - done in 6 days

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This is really advanced, but for newer brewers it might be intimidating so I'm posting it here.

There is a lot of preaching about fermenting 2-3 weeks, but I want to provide a different point of view. Remember, yeast are going to do what yeast are going to do WHEN they want to do it. Sometimes it takes 3 weeks to ferment, clean up and drop out of suspension. Sometimes it doesn't.

Last Monday I brewed a 1.051 gravity pale ale with some washed PacMan yeast. The yeast was 3 months old and a starter was made 4 days before brew day. I let the 1500ml starter ferment out, crashed it for 24 hours and then pitched it into my wort.

This was a 3-gallon batch so I hit the wort with 1:00 of pure O2 before pitching at 62 degrees. I let it free-rise for the first 48 hours to 68 where I stabilized the temp. I had good blowoff activity for 48 hours before I switched to an airlock where it's been since.

When I finished brewing today I had everything already sanitized so I decided to do a gravity check at day 6. Gravity had dropped from 1.051 to 1.012 and the top half of the carboy was already clearing - indicating that the yeast were already done and dropping out. I decided to dry hop today because if the gravity drops anymore it should only be a point or two and that's not enough activity to drive the aroma off. When I get back in town Thursday I'm going to put the carboy in the fridge to crash it and add gelatin on Friday. On Sunday, it will get kegged - a day under 2 full weeks since brew day.

I may let it condition for a week at room temp before I start carbing it, or I may not. I dunno yet.

The morale of the story is to remember that guidelines are just that - guidelines. Let the beer and yeast tell you when to move to the next step.

Cheers!

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i agree,i dont think ive ever let one sit in primary more than a week. i dont take gravity readings for 3 days to see if its done either.once the foam cap falls down into the wort i either put it in secondary to clean up some more or i bottle or keg it.

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I will say that I don't bottle/keg after the first gravity reading, even if I think it's a terminal gravity. The yeast still do need time to clean up all the fermentation byproducts, but there is no reason that it can't happen quickly if all of your elements are under control.

And I'm not advocating that a brewer on his second batch should check gravity at 7 days and plan to bottle - just that as you (generally speaking) progress with your brewing you shouldn't be afraid to revisit your timelines.

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"Kealia" post=389927 said:

I will say that I don't bottle/keg after the first gravity reading, even if I think it's a terminal gravity. The yeast still do need time to clean up all the fermentation byproducts, but there is no reason that it can't happen quickly if all of your elements are under control.

And I'm not advocating that a brewer on his second batch should check gravity at 7 days and plan to bottle - just that as you (generally speaking) progress with your brewing you shouldn't be afraid to revisit your timelines.

the only gravity readings i take are start and finish.and as a new brewer i was impatient,but as ive grown, ive come to know when the yeasties are done and when to go on to the next step.just my 2 cents :cheers:

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I just tried a Centennial Blonde tonight. It was only nine (or ten?) days in the fermenter, two weeks in the bottle. Good, still a touch green.

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The Danstar yeast will finish out in a week, but I give it a wee bit longer. (because my bottling schedule is different that what I want it to be...life and job get in the way) I seldom worry about it as I know the yeasty beasty will clean up after the party and still be there for the primer.
Down side... I may have 8 gallons to bottle next saturday...

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"yankeedag" post=389949 said:

The Danstar yeast will finish out in a week, but I give it a wee bit longer. (because my bottling schedule is different that what I want it to be...life and job get in the way) I seldom worry about it as I know the yeasty beasty will clean up after the party and still be there for the primer.
Down side... I may have 8 gallons to bottle next saturday...


You have to invest in a kegging setup then, easy peasy fill to single or multiple corny kegs depending on how many gallons they have to hold.

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"Screwy Brewer" post=389951 said:

"yankeedag" post=389949 said:

The Danstar yeast will finish out in a week, but I give it a wee bit longer. (because my bottling schedule is different that what I want it to be...life and job get in the way) I seldom worry about it as I know the yeasty beasty will clean up after the party and still be there for the primer.
Down side... I may have 8 gallons to bottle next saturday...


You have to invest in a kegging setup then, easy peasy fill to single or multiple corny kegs depending on how many gallons they have to hold.

Aw Screwy! Have you forgotten I have the system? I've had to shut it down because of the possible move. I've 6~5 gallon kegs and a 3 gallon keg. Can't use them now. I won't be setting up the kegging system when I move. That is up to my son.

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"yankeedag" post=389952 said:

"Screwy Brewer" post=389951 said:

"yankeedag" post=389949 said:

The Danstar yeast will finish out in a week, but I give it a wee bit longer. (because my bottling schedule is different that what I want it to be...life and job get in the way) I seldom worry about it as I know the yeasty beasty will clean up after the party and still be there for the primer.
Down side... I may have 8 gallons to bottle next saturday...


You have to invest in a kegging setup then, easy peasy fill to single or multiple corny kegs depending on how many gallons they have to hold.

Aw Screwy! Have you forgotten I have the system? I've had to shut it down because of the possible move. I've 6~5 gallon kegs and a 3 gallon keg. Can't use them now. I won't be setting up the kegging system when I move. That is up to my son.


Was wondering why those pictures didn't show sites of Australia, I guess you're still packed and waiting for a move. I'm sure if you had the choice kegging would be your first option too.

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No fears at all there. Why would someone fear it... if it's done it's done.

I mainly stick to a longer rotation just because I'm still using LBKs as my primary fermenters, and I don't bother with secondary's anymore, I threw out all my carboys 15 years ago... and with 3-4 of them in rotation it's easier for me to bottle/brew on a 2-3 week schedule vs. turning them over as soon as they are done.

Often they are done in a week or less, but it's not hurting me to ignore them for another week. I consider it "bulk aging" like I used to do back in the day in a secondary. But I don't bother with secondary anymore.

Does it really help in any way besides scheduling? Probably not, probably doesn't do a damn thing except let more stuff drop out of suspension. But it doesn't hurt, so I don't stress about it.

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I've found Danstar yeast to be an extremely fast finisher as well, usually right around 1 week total primary fermentation if not less.
I used to be a liquid yeast only guy, but I've come to enjoy dry yeast much more.

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"jivex5k" post=390084 said:

I've found Danstar yeast to be an extremely fast finisher as well, usually right around 1 week total primary fermentation if not less.
I used to be a liquid yeast only guy, but I've come to enjoy dry yeast much more.

+1. I've got a collection of various harvested liquid yeasts, but will happily use a rehydrated dry packet like US-05, S-04 or Notty if it's style-consistent. I'll even skip using the O2 tank/stone if using dry and it takes right off.

Most often, my ale ferments run 9-14 days (confirmed finished via hydrometer, of course) followed by a 5-7 day cold crash prior to keg/bottle. It depends on the yeast strain, cell count and the gravity.

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I always caveat the "3-4" rule with....unless you have a hydro and can take gravity readings and you know that your fermentation is over.

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True Kealia, my Honey Wheat finished early but I did let it roll with the 3 week rule . Bottled last weekend and will wait 2 weeks to try .

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Ya all noticed that Kealia did everthing by the book. A fermentation can reach FG in 24 hrs.


!. Good yeast

2. Pitched correctly

3. starter & wort near the same temp. Having more than 4 degrees difference is going to stress the yeast out

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mashani said:

No fears at all there. Why would someone fear it... if it's done it's done.

Yeah, maybe "fear" isn't the right word. But you summed up my entire post with 5 words: if it's done, it's done!

Just something for the newer brewers to think about once they've got the basics down. And for more experienced brewers to play with as well if they want to increase production/reduce time. 

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yep that is why ya can never have too many cornys.  Found one back in the cave at work only going to cost me a case of beer, for the club's G.M.!!!!

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This got kegged today after a dry hop, gelatin for fining and a solid 4 day cold crash. The only thing stopping me from putting it on gas today is the fact that I don't have room in the mini fridge.

I need my wife to polish off the last of the hef to make room. Right now, it's going to condition at room temp until that happens, but with this one I'd have no issues with going straight to gas if I could.

Smelled. So. Good.

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Is Pac-Man yeast the same strain as the SD Super Yeast?  I did a batch using the SD Super yeast, and it finished in 4 days!  The gravity dropped all the way to 1.013 (exactly where it was supposed to be)  in 4 freaking days.  When I checked the SG, 5 days later, it was still the same.  It basically seemed to be a fast Chico-strain with a slightly drier finish. 

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I'm pretty sure they are different, but they may be very close in terms of profiles.

It's pretty cool when things ferment out quickly - it certainly helps to speed things up when you are anxious to get that first taste. 

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I've always wanted to try the Pac Man yeast.  It's kind of difficult to find around here though.  How is the flavor profile as compared to the Wyeast 1056?

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Quite possible losman26. I got a packet of the danstar ale yeast...didn't bother to remember the buckthreefiffy name of it. Made a batch of beer, only took a week for it to hit final gravity. Saved that yeast, washed it, and used it again. As I recall, it's not much for adding "flavor" to it like say, WLP004, or the like, but it's fast.

So if you have a short pipeline (he he he I said short pipeline), the danstar would be a great one for putting some up real quick.

Then, you can return to your normally scheduled programing.

or... um... ah... do something else?

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