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jivex5k

Oxygen Setups

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I'm interested in getting one as the next step I can take to improve my beers.
I'd be interested in any personal testimony on specific setups you guys have and enjoy.
I brew 5 gallon batches, not that it would matter much, just more time needed running the o2 i'd assume.

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I bought an oxygen regulator and a stainless steel 2 micron diffusion stone from Rebel Brewer only to find out that the regulator and stone had different sized hose barbs. The regulator had a 1/8 inch hose barb and the stone had a 1/4 inch hose barb. Needless to say connecting the two with a piece of vinyl tubing and getting an air tight seal was no easy task.

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Just checked out their website, looks like they realized they had this problem:
"**RB NOTE – We have changed suppliers on these regulators and they now come with a 1/4? barb"
So that's cool, at least they are paying attention.

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I use THIS flow regulator attached to a small industrial O2 tank a friend gave to me along with an acetylene tank. A 0.5 micron stone from Austin Homebrew makes the tiny bubbles.

I usually don't oxygenate when using dry yeast. With liquid yeast in ales, I hit it for 50-60 seconds on 1.5L. Double that time for lagers.

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"BigFloyd" post=390074 said:

I use THIS flow regulator attached to a small industrial O2 tank a friend gave to me along with an acetylene tank. A 0.5 micron stone from Austin Homebrew makes the tiny bubbles.

I usually don't oxygenate when using dry yeast. With liquid yeast in ales, I hit it for 50-60 seconds on 1.5L. Double that time for lagers.


Interesting.
Why don't you use it for dry yeast?

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Q&A from Danstar:

I always aerate my wort when using liquid yeast. Do I need to aerate the wort before pitching dry yeast?

No, there is no need to aerate the wort but it does not harm the yeast either. During its aerobic production, dry yeast accumulates sufficient amounts of unsaturated fatty acids and sterols to produce enough biomass in the first stage of fermentation. The only reason to aerate the wort when using wet yeast is to provide the yeast with oxygen so that it can produce sterols and unsaturated fatty acids which are important parts of the cell membrane and therefore essential for biomass production. If the slurry from dry yeast fermentation is re-pitched from one batch of beer to another, the wort has to be aerated as with any liquid yeast.

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Oh cool...well I have been washing yeast lately so it would be best to get one anyways, save money in the long run.
But that's good to know I don't have to bother shaking my fermentation bucket when pitching danstar.

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"BigFloyd" post=390088 said:

Q&A from Danstar:

I always aerate my wort when using liquid yeast. Do I need to aerate the wort before pitching dry yeast?

No, there is no need to aerate the wort but it does not harm the yeast either. During its aerobic production, dry yeast accumulates sufficient amounts of unsaturated fatty acids and sterols to produce enough biomass in the first stage of fermentation. The only reason to aerate the wort when using wet yeast is to provide the yeast with oxygen so that it can produce sterols and unsaturated fatty acids which are important parts of the cell membrane and therefore essential for biomass production. If the slurry from dry yeast fermentation is re-pitched from one batch of beer to another, the wort has to be aerated as with any liquid yeast.


I haven't used dry yeast in several years but it sounds like there's nothing to be gained by oxygenating wort prior to pitching it. Although I always rehydrated my dry yeast before pitching it back then I was aerating the wort with a long handled plastic spoon.


Which reminds me, if you think the dry yeast is questionable adding a pinch of sugar to the water used to rehydrate a bit of dry yeast should start to krauzen if it's still ok.

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The only time I rehydrated I ended up killing the yeast...
Probably shouldn't have used the upper temperature limit of 96F for rehydration though lol.
I haven't had any problems with dry yeast attenuation though, but I don't have a control experiment to test it against.
I think my biggest concern is keeping a stable ferm temp at this point, but I don't have the money to invest in a fridge/temp controller.

I have a cooler with ice bottles but, you know, it's hard to keep it stable like that.

So it seems like oxygen won't be a big help on the recent batch that came out poorly because I used dry yeast from danstar, my brewing buddy seemed to think it suffered from DMS and Fusels.
Not sure how I got DMS in a non dry-hopped extract brown ale...but I know it fermentated hotter than I'd like it to have at one point.

I have an IPA going right now, I upped the amount of frozen bottles in the cooler this time, want to keep it around 64F.

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In order of priority, good and consistent control of pitch/fermentation temps (like in the low to mid-60's during the first week for most ales, then slowly raised to finish) ranks much higher than bubbling pure O2 through the wort.

If you have the room for it, a used fridge/freezer and an STC-1000 controller is probably the best brewing equipment investment you can make.

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"BigFloyd" post=390108 said:

In order of priority, good and consistent control of pitch/fermentation temps (like in the low to mid-60's during the first week for most ales, then slowly raised to finish) ranks much higher than bubbling pure O2 through the wort.

If you have the room for it, a used fridge/freezer and an STC-1000 controller is probably the best brewing equipment investment you can make.


I'm not too sure about that train of thought, the more o2 the more yeast cells is how I look at it. The more yeast cells the faster the fermentation and the better the beer. Not to mention the more yeast cells available for washing and storage once the fermentations done.

I guess I'm the devil's advocate tonight but the design I used is simply gravity fed, no electronics involved at all. The frozen water bottles placed in the top hopper naturally convect the colder air down to be replaced by the rising warmer air. I've easily held fermentation temperatures of 48-52F this way for a lot of my Hammerfest Marzen brews, of which I'm already itching to do again.

It's brewer's choice both ways so do what makes you happier. I'm not saying one way is better than the next, only pointing out there's more than one way to skin a cat, or brew a great tasting beer.

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As an O2 bubbler myself, I'm certainly not saying that aeration isn't important when pitching liquid yeast, especially liquid lager yeast. It obviously is, but lots of outstanding brews are made by folks who haven't dropped the significant coin needed for a bottled oxygen infusion setup. There are other, cheaper methods available for good aeration of ale wort. They are a bit marginal for lagers. And there's also the option of using dry yeast (which needs no wort aeration).

If someone has a limited brewing equipment budget and wants to make the biggest possible impact on the quality of their homebrew, good ferment temp control is the first area (beyond the basic brew gear) in which to make the investment.

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"BigFloyd" post=390088 said:

Q&A from Danstar:

I always aerate my wort when using liquid yeast. Do I need to aerate the wort before pitching dry yeast?

No, there is no need to aerate the wort but it does not harm the yeast either. During its aerobic production, dry yeast accumulates sufficient amounts of unsaturated fatty acids and sterols to produce enough biomass in the first stage of fermentation. The only reason to aerate the wort when using wet yeast is to provide the yeast with oxygen so that it can produce sterols and unsaturated fatty acids which are important parts of the cell membrane and therefore essential for biomass production. If the slurry from dry yeast fermentation is re-pitched from one batch of beer to another, the wort has to be aerated as with any liquid yeast.

Interesting and thanks. Sort of answers the question as to why olive oil is helpful as well. Im still goona aerate the bejeepers out of my wort. Might try splitting a batch and see if it makes a difference next time.

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This is the setup that I bought and use with the small O2 tanks.

If I had to do it over again I would have bought this one because of the straight stainless wand instead of the tubing that I have. Just a personal preference.

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