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Manowarfan1

Red Ale Recipe - advice sought

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Hail Borg - slapping together a version of a red ale with some leftovers and had a few questions. Any feedback would be appreciated:

3 LB 14 Oz 2 row

8 oz Maris Otter (these two are a sub for 5 lb of 2 row)

4 oz Biscuit (subbed for Victory malt which I dont have)

2 oz Chocolate 350L

4 oz Crystal 150L (instead of 120L)

8 0z Crystal 60L (instead of 40L)

12 oz Vienna (instead of munich, using it all up as it was getting old)

Dont have Amarillo or Centennial on hand so going all Cascade (cascade is only 5.6 instead of the 9 and 10s of the others). Last time I didnt do any bittering boil, just some 20, 10 and 0.

Was going to go with .5 at 30, 1.0 at 20, 1.5 at 10 and 1.0 at flameout.

Beersmith gives me 19 IBU and everything else including color is right in line or right on or barely over the line with regard to an Irish Red Ale (which it was originally).

Mashing for 45 minutes when water was 176 and stove preheated to 170F. Add 3 quarts of water heated to 202 (?) for 10 minutes after that, remove grains and begin boil. Was going to use either US o5 or s04 but I do have an Irish ale yeast but havent made a starter and was saving that for later.

It LOOKS like I am reading beersmith right and this may end up similar to the one I made before (partial mash extract) but better but my gut is telling me something is wrong. Any thoughts? Suggestions?

Cheers

jeff

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Jeff...I like your ingredients list.  And the hop schedule should give you a good beer too.  With no bittering addition, it should give you a nice malty beer with some good hop flavor and aroma.

The one thing that sticks out to me is your mash.  You might consider mashing for 60 minutes instead of 45 to ensure a good conversion.  I would also be careful of your temps.  If you let that sit in your oven set at 170 it might stay too high.  Your ideal mash temp should be around 150 to 154 degrees for a medium body beer.  If you heat the water to a strike temp of 170, then mix in your grains, that should drop your temp into the desired range.  Then put in the oven and turn off the heat.  Let it sit in the oven for 60 minutes and you should be good.  You can check the temp every 15 minutes.  You can turn on the oven if it's getting too cool, or open the door a little if it's too hot.

As for the yeast, either the 04 or 05 would work just fine. 

Looks like a good recipe.  Good luck and keep us posted.

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My 2.8 cents (adjusted for inflation) is that you have more specialty malts than I think you need.  I would increase one or both of the base malts and remove some of the specialty malts. I'm not saying it would be bad, but there's a lot of stuff going on there and I think you're going to likely have a more complex flavored beer than what you are aiming for (for a red ale).

I agree with Chris too that you should mash for a minimum of 1 hour. 

I'm also a fan of Cascade and I enjoy using that hop alot.

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Thanks for the replies, unfortunately I didnt see them before being finished but stuck pretty much to the plan. I didnt leave the mash in the oven for the full 60 I normally would - I saw on beer smith for 45 but I think that may have been when I had a different method picked (maybe BIAB or something).

I did have the oven turned off after the preheat and when I put the grains in the 170F water it dropped it right down to 154 or so after stirrinng.

I was aiming for malty and not hoppy even though SWMBO is becoming much more of a hop head (except for stouts and porters etc which have some bitterness built in).

With regard to the base vs specialty grain bill - I was trying to empty out some bags I had for too long and keep from opening others (I could have opened the last bag of 2 row to get the other pound I needed but didnt want to until next brew day) so it will definitely be a kitchen sink/mutt of a beer but it will at least be something different coming out of the pipeline in a few weeks time. Looks like this one is going to ferment for 3.5 weeks as it would hit 21 days right when we head to Louisville for the ironman. We get back from that I have a week or so to bottle and brew up another batch of something before heading to ATL for the music fest. Hopefully around that time I will have some things finalized in garage and can move all brewing ops out there :)

They say taht what doesnt kill you makes you stronger - so we will see if that is the case with this one :)

Cheers

jeff

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Its all good and many times, brews like this are surprisingly enjoyable and then, you can't make them again as you don't have all the ingredients.

I'm sure it'll be good. Maybe not what you were aiming for, but good.

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Manowarfan1 said:Mashing for 45 minutes when water was 176 and stove preheated to 170F.

 

I hope this was a typo and should have read 156°. If you drop those grains into 176° water it's not going to end well. It will settle out at about 170°  just a little high on the mash temp side. If you ment to type 156° then carry on.

Hell don't mind me. Right after I posted the last to posts showed up (man-o-man gotta love the new forum). It must be how your profile is set up. If I want to mash at 154°, 162° is as high as I go. and most of my mashes are 152° or less.

Nothing to see here carry on and glad it worked out for you.

Hope to see you in September

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For my money, roasted barley is a must for an Irish (or any) Red Ale. Both the color contribution and flavor are a typical element, and add a lot of character. I use 5 to 6 oz. in a five gallon batch.

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