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tbwrangler2000

Secondary fermentation

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Does anybody know if it would be beneficial to do a secondary fermentation by racking my beer into a second LBK.......or is it a waste of time?

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In most cases, racking to a 2nd keg is unnecessary.  The usual exception would be a very high gravity brew, which can need additional fermentation time to clean up all the yeast byproducts.  Having the beer in the primary doesn't become an issue until about 4 weeks, when autolysis of the dead yeast cells can occur. 

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tbwrangler2000 said:Ok thanks.I was just wondering because with the bigger beer making kits have a secondary fermentation.What is the reason for this then?

Answered above but perhaps not clear enough - to get the beer off the yeast cake, which COULD create off flavors with high gravity brews.

https://www.google.com/search?q=why+secondary+fermentation&oq=why+secondary+fermentation&aqs=chrome.0.69i57j0l3j69i62l2.4182j0&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

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Many also use a secondary if they are dry hopping or adding fruit after the primary fermentation as well.

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LBKs do not make good secondaries due to excessive head-space.  But, as stated above, secondaries are rarely necessary anyway.  Dry hopping, adding fruit, and long-term bulk-conditioning (i.e. lagers) are all possible exceptions.

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+1 to Packerduf's post. Secondaries can also be useful when you have a yeast that does not floculate well in the primary (if cloudy beer bugs you).

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I should correct myself a bit.  If needed I will secondary in a 5g carboy for a 5g batch.  In my opinion, the LBK has way too much headspace for doing a secondary unless you might put in some fruit that will ferment as there will be no CO2 to push the O2 out.  If you were looking to lager or dry hop (ie no more fermenting) a 2-2.5 gallon jug or pail would probably be better (with an airlock of course).

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Needs better terminology.

I think those new to the hobby think that something different happens after primary fermentation is finished.  It's really primary and secondary vessel for fermentation to happen.  The two stages of fermentation (most likely way more but two for many) are Active, and Cleanup.

Cleanup will happen faster in the Primary vessel with greater numbers of yeast to help clean up.  Transfer to a Secondary vessel if additional hops, fruit, oak, etc are needed.

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