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Rick3575

New to Mr. Beer

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Hi all.   I got a Mr. Beer kit from my daughter for Christmas and finally got around to making my first batch a couple months ago.  It was the West Coast Pale Ale, and I thought it turned out great. 

My second batch was St. Patricks Irish Stout.  I couldn't wait for it to condition for the proper time, and I cracked one open a week early.  It was OK, but then I waited.  After conditioning for 3 weeks now, it's really changed and become a lot smoother.  I see what you guys mean when you say not to rush it.  

I just bottled the 3rd batch, American Ale, done straight up.  My 4th batch is still fermenting in my 2nd keg.  It's the Cowboy Honey Light recipe.  I'm looking forward to seeing how that turns out.

Since I just bottled the American Ale, I have an empty keg. I also have a can of Patriot Lager that just arrived.  Any suggestions on a good recipe for this brew?  I want to start another right away.  What's a good one to try?

Rick

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Welcome to the forum! There are a lot of knowledge people on here so ask away. Sounds like you got a good start on brewing and you are taking off fast. It is always a good thing to brew everything straight up for the first time. That away you can see how it tastes and then alter it form there to make something that  you will really like. So Welcome!

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Welcome!  I haven't tried the Patriot Lager, but in general a good way to start is to look around the Recipes section of the Mr Beer web site for ideas.  After clicking on Recipes on the menu, you can select "By Hopped Malt Extract".  Something is likely to look interesting. 

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Depends on what you want to do.  Do you want to play with flavor?  ABV?.  If you want to challenge yourself go to your LHBS and get some Lager yeast and pitch that, then at the first signs of fermentation, put it in a COLD water bath around 48-50 degrees for about 3-4 weeks

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I actually thought about doing that.  I have an Igloo 12 volt cooler that I haven't used in years.  So I bought an AC adapter and tested it.  It'll keep a steady 45 degrees in the cooler.  A Mr. Beer keg fits nicely inside.  So I want to try a real lager.  I'll let you know how it turns out in 6 weeks or so.

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Rick,

You might want to check out the recipe for the "Blue Patriot":

RECIPE INCLUDES:

1 Can Patriot Lager HME

1 Packet Dry Brewing Yeast (under lid of HME)

1 Pouch Booster™

2 Cans Blueberries in Light Syrup 

1 Packet No-Rinse Cleanser

I made this last summer and it was very tasty.  I received quite a few compliments on this brew.

Welcome to the obsession!!

Rick

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I've made both the 1776 Ale and Powerful Patriot recipes and was very happy with the results.

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I would recommend researching some Hops. Looking into the flavor and aroma profile that you find interesting. Then research how long you want to add it into your recipe. It will range from battering, to flavoring, or even just adding aroma. Also look into other thing like LME or DME.

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I agree.  Hops it is.  I just tried my first Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and that's it. My new home brewing quest is going to be trying to come as close to that as I can.  Anybody have a good start for a SN Pale Ale clone?

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Mr. Beer's Northwest pale ale is meant to be similar. If you want to make something on your own, use a simple malt bill of approximately 90% two row, and 10% caramel/crystal 60*L. You're looking for a color of around 8-11 SRM, so if you use extract, go with a pale extract and steep enough crystal malt to get you to that color (if you don't use brewing software, now is the time to start. This is excellent shareware: http://www.brewmate.net/   ). Your boil will use 7 AAU Magnum for 60 minutes, 4 AAU Perle for 30 minutes, 6 AAU Cascade for 10 minutes and 10-12 AAU Cascade for 0 minutes. Mash at 153* and ferment with a Chico derived yeast like US-05 or 1056 at 68*.

Those hop amounts are for a five gallon batch, so you'll need to adjust for size. You're looking for 33-40 IBUs. The Brewmate software makes scaling extremely easy.

Your beer will probably NOT taste just like Sierra Nevada. Brewing process and water make big differences in the final outcome, but this is a good base to start with, and it will get you  pretty close.

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Oly, I appreciate you taking the time to post all that information, but I'm afraid that at my skill/experience level, it's over my head.  I don't even know what some of that stuff means. 

I will try the Northwest Pale Ale though.  Any suggestions on how to modify it, or should I just brew it straight up?

Thanks,

Rick

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Rick, I've only been brewing since the first of the year, but I've still been able to brew 6 batches, plus a couple of cider batches for my wife. I've slowly picked up terminology along the way, but you can still make beer following the recipes while you do. It's a pretty decent On the Job Training hobby - and you can still drink some of your mistakes. :)

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Yeah, I'm getting there.  I got some books to read from my dad, who used to brew beer years ago.  Learning a lot from those. 

I just brewed my first and second batches in August.  I have my third batch bottled, forth and fifth are in the kegs fermenting (I had to get a second LBK), and the HME's for the 6th and 7th batches are here waiting.  I love this hobby (so far).  The only thing I don't like is the time.   The waiting is killing me. 

Rick

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Rick3575 - The Northwest Pale Ale is a great base to work from, as a pale ale.  As you gain experience, you will become comfortble with steeping grain and then doing more, at whatever speed is comfortable for you.  You can make some great beers in the meantime.  For my taste as a foundation for other recipes, the NWPA has a bit less gravity (malt content) than I want, and proportionally is a bit more hoppy, so I added 1/2 pound of dry malt extract ("DME") of light extract, but you may be more comfortable with light liquid extract (LME).  That made a great pale ale, and will be a great starting point fir other brews. 

As a reference while you learn, I suggest rsading How to Brew, by John Palmer.  Version 1 is online (use Google to find it), but version 3 is as a book is affordable and has useful updates. 

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